In your opinion who is one of the best HDSLR Cinematographers on DVXUSER site

to clarify - the 7d, 5d etc testing period is over, the basic concept that a cine size chip and 'look' (excluding res and DR) for less than $20k is now understood and IMO being a cinematorapher requires working on real projects

of course new devices need testing

Unfortuanately Im old enough to have watched Star Wars on the big screen when released in '77 or thereabouts

S

That's really blinkered thinking a cinematographer is only a cinematographer when working on "real" projects? What is a real project exactly? Being paid? I have been paid for some of the most mundane stuff imaginable, does that make me a cinematographer on that job even though it challenged me not in the slightest? But if I shoot something that challenges me for my own project that isn't paid I cannot call myself a cinematographer because of that?

Who cares about labels...why are you so keen to say what is and is not?

Things have changed so much in the past few years with Vimeo and the tech etc...more and more people are going on and doing exceptional work, whether for themselves or for clients. Some of the greatest cinematography I have seen over the past 12 months has been from people doing their own personal projects.

People can call themselves what they want. It's their work that speaks more than titles. For me personally I am lucky that I work as a Cinematographer and I am very busy shooting everything from commercials, documentaries, features to my favourite thing, my own stuff...

Funny thing is, someone VERY high up in Hollywood and very well known in the movie world calls all DPs cameramen, every one from me to ASC guys. Hey it's a title. Who cares
 
That's really blinkered thinking a cinematographer is only a cinematographer when working on "real" projects? What is a real project exactly? Being paid?

I thought I defined what I consider to be a real 'client'..

"Be that client ones own mind, a debuting penniless student director, or a budgeted and paying corporate client or record label"

The reason it is nice to see 'real' work is that often, for me at least, things I practice in my shed or on my secretary dont go quite so well when Im trying to do them under some sort of pressure be that the time pressure of making an indy flick on no budget or the pressure of an interview with someone 'important' for which Im being paid and I will get a bollocking if I fck it up

If your work is real to you then it is real - I see a lot of it as 'proof of concept' and of course some as very good and very real eg.. the Oxfam stuff

I love this BTW - not the finest 'cinematography' but I love the way he pulled it off and the fact that I enjoy watching it for no reason other than the hilarious content - which I understand and engage with - thats cinematography ultimately IMO

its also brilliant because of the staging, framing, and continuity - solid stuff that drifts into the background and lets the story shine - the camera work becomes invisible .. result


 
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Oh I totally forgot!

The reason why I got into DSLR and bought a D90, was because I saw Dan Chung's organic news pieces and events shot on it. HE is AWESOME.

He's on this forum as 'pressphotographer'
 
I have been paid for some of the most mundane stuff imaginable

BAM, recently shot dance performance component for a US Christian group. The words and dance moves are for kids, to Christian music. Nothing wrong with that. Once we had the studio lighting rigged. ZZZZZzzzzz.......
 
thank you so much blondie + pianoboy, i havent been on this forum in quite some time but i was curious where i on this forum i was getting traffic from.

i am extremely humbled to have found my name mentioned on this list.

perhaps this will make it easier to share....



enjoy follow colleagues + THANK YOU.

-myw

Michael's gotta be on here somewhere:

http://www.vimeo.com/michaelywong

I LOVE this video. Its amazing.
http://www.vimeo.com/12014034

Tis all!

That video is incredible!
 
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It's been said already but I would say I have a soft spot for Hunter Richards' and Matthew Bennett's work. Kholi does some nice shooting too, loved the way the western was filmed. I wouldn't really categorize them as "HDSLR cinematographers" though, they are just good cinematographers who like to experiment.
 
Don't have much to add that hasn't been said already.The guys doing weddings are coming up with amazing stuff and I second Michael Wong's work as stunning.

No idea who stillmotion are but hey I am sure some of them may be on DVXuser - wow - http://vimeo.com/user403001
 
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Let me drop this in so that the GH1 gets some representation. It's the trailer for a narrative short I directed, lit and shot.

 
Let me drop this in so that the GH1 gets some representation. It's the trailer for a narrative short I directed, lit and shot.

Kicks the unholy shit out of Reverie, that's for sure. Also LOL'd at the use of the canon as a propcamera. GH13 does look great.
 
Kicks the unholy shit out of Reverie, that's for sure. Also LOL'd at the use of the canon as a propcamera. GH13 does look great.

That footage is not GH13, it's pre-hack GH1 if I'm not mistaken and it looks awesome.

Our film will be done shooting in the next couple of months - then on to editing what will be a 2.5 hr long epic GH1/GH13 film, most of it shot anamorphically to boot.
 
I really think you should look up what the definition of a cinematographer is...you seem to be getting things somewhat mixed up. The director/ writer tells the story, the cinematographer captures that story.~Philop Bloom


"Cinematography is a creative and interpretive process that culminates in the authorship of an original work of art rather than the simple recording of a physical event." -John Hora,ASC Page 1, American Cinematographer Manual Ninth Edition.

Every one of the million decisions you make creating images with your artistic collaborators should be based on the story your telling, the characters together your creating, the mood your setting, how you want the audience to feel and last what you feel.

Sometimes if its a commercial you may back light a bottle to help make some one feel thirsty. Shooting an actor the way they smile from a lower angle to give him more power in a scene. A dolly that crosses the line during the climax of a story. adding a little foreboding purple before someones life comes to an end. Sometimes what the image needs is what makes me, the Tallent, and the Director happy.


Same as a poet describing a sunrise all these techniques born from our imagination, the collaborative vision, and our skill do far more then just capture an image they help create it.

Vincent Pascoe

www.vincentpascoe.com

http://www.vimeo.com/vincentpascoe/videos/all

http://www.facebook.com/vincentpascoe
 
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Hunter's the man H. Richards that is .

Compositing is spot on !
Handheld works has a nice " breathe" to it.


Also like Matt Workman's and Philip Bloom's work.
 
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A cinematographer is very much a storyteller... Even photographers are storytellers and do far more than passively "capture" a story.

Where you put the camera, what your frame is, how you control lighting... all these things affect the story. To say a cinematographer merely "captures" a story without having a hand in telling it is (I'm going to say it) rather shallow, in my opinion.

The director isn't the only person on set who worries about the story.

One of the things that separates a "very competent" cinematographer from a "truly great" cinematographer is their storytelling ability, not lighting or composition and certainly not whether they shoot on this camera versus that one.
 
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