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Introduction to the Z90, NX80, and AX700

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    #16
    Issues under spotlights

    Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post
    Thanks! I really appreciate the feedback and your taking the time to post. It is always nice to hear that the training I do is hitting it's mark.
    Hi Doug--I double checked your recommended settings, and thanks again for the tutorial.
    On a stage with (no surprise) stage lighting, my footage was blown out and I could not get the exposure compensation to work. When I add exposure compensation it makes very little difference.
    Is there a way I can adjust or optimize your settings for stage lighting? I need to leave some auto exposure on because of shifts in performance lighting.
    Thanks so much David T
    HD Video: GH5, G85, ax700
    Microphones: Sennheiser MKH 80 MKH20 MKH40
    Neumann 11-pattern dual capsule main pair by Rens Heijnis
    Schoeps MK2, MK2H, MK21, MK41
    own design ribbon mics


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      #17
      Hi David,

      I'm picturing a stage with brightly lit performers against a far darker background and the performers are relatively small in the frame. If that is the situation, then there is really no substitute for using full manual exposure. You'll just have to ride it up and down yourself manually as necessary. I know that's not the answer you want, but that is a very hard situation for the camera to figure out on it's own.
      Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
      HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
      http://www.dougjensen.com/

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        #18
        Thanks, Doug. Appreciate it.
        HD Video: GH5, G85, ax700
        Microphones: Sennheiser MKH 80 MKH20 MKH40
        Neumann 11-pattern dual capsule main pair by Rens Heijnis
        Schoeps MK2, MK2H, MK21, MK41
        own design ribbon mics


        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post
          Hi David,

          I'm picturing a stage with brightly lit performers against a far darker background and the performers are relatively small in the frame. If that is the situation, then there is really no substitute for using full manual exposure. You'll just have to ride it up and down yourself manually as necessary. I know that's not the answer you want, but that is a very hard situation for the camera to figure out on it's own.
          Question: I had good results manually riding the gain--is the picture profile I have now transferable to other Sony cameras, like the A7R types, or all they all different? In other words, can one match picture profiles across Sony cameras?
          HD Video: GH5, G85, ax700
          Microphones: Sennheiser MKH 80 MKH20 MKH40
          Neumann 11-pattern dual capsule main pair by Rens Heijnis
          Schoeps MK2, MK2H, MK21, MK41
          own design ribbon mics


          Comment


            #20
            Manually riding the gain, huh? That is a very unusual way of controlling exposure. Wasn't the changes in noise/graininess visible?

            Picture profiles are very specific for each model of camera, and very few of them share the same menus and menus options anyway, so it probably wouldn't work to use Z90 settings on an A7 series camera. But it might be a good starting point for further tweaking. Good luck.
            Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
            HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
            http://www.dougjensen.com/

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post
              Manually riding the gain, huh? That is a very unusual way of controlling exposure. Wasn't the changes in noise/graininess visible?

              Picture profiles are very specific for each model of camera, and very few of them share the same menus and menus options anyway, so it probably wouldn't work to use Z90 settings on an A7 series camera. But it might be a good starting point for further tweaking. Good luck.
              As far as gain, I was following your advice from your previous post. Maybe I misunderstood. Yes, you can definitely see it but I switched it in between takes as the sun was going down.
              I tried the settings on a few of the settings on the FF Sony cams--all the menus were the same, pretty much--and with a bit of tweaking they look very good, thanks.
              Your settings for the ax700 really give good results.
              HD Video: GH5, G85, ax700
              Microphones: Sennheiser MKH 80 MKH20 MKH40
              Neumann 11-pattern dual capsule main pair by Rens Heijnis
              Schoeps MK2, MK2H, MK21, MK41
              own design ribbon mics


              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by DrDave View Post

                As far as gain, I was following your advice from your previous post. Maybe I misunderstood. Yes, you can definitely see it but I switched it in between takes as the sun was going down.
                I tried the settings on a few of the settings on the FF Sony cams--all the menus were the same, pretty much--and with a bit of tweaking they look very good, thanks.
                Your settings for the ax700 really give good results.
                Thanks for the comments and if you're happy with the results you got with riding the gain, that's what matters. I looked back over the previous posts and I was suggesting riding the iris up and down to compensate, even if that meant having a higher gain setting the whole way through. I can handle some noise in the picture, when necessary, but I don't really care to see it going up and down. Fluctuating gain doesn't look good and makes it harder to clean up in post. But there are many ways to skin a cat.
                Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
                HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
                http://www.dougjensen.com/

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post
                  I was crunching numbers this morning and realized I crossed a threshold last week with my Z280. I got my camera in September 2018 and as near as I can determine, as of last week I have sold enough stock footage that was shot with the Z280 to cover the entire cost of the camera. Not bad. And those shots will continue to sell over and over again for years. The rest us pure gravy. I love this camera.
                  I came across this when I looking back over my old posts on this thread. It's funny I'd see this now because on Tuesday I was crunching my stock footage numbers again and noticed that a single clip I shot with the Z280 three years ago has now earned more than the entire cost of the camera. And there are two more clips from the same day that have earned close to that amount, not to mention all the other stuff I've uploaded that I shot with it. You cannot beat a nice little portable ENG camera with a good viewfinder, 10-bit 4K, and a 12x lens. So damn easy to shoot with. It ain't the "cool" camera but I love that little Z280. The hipsters with their ponytails, funky hats, wide angle lens, and running around with their mirrorless camera stuck on a gimbal don't know what their missing.
                  Last edited by Doug Jensen; 01-14-2022, 07:28 PM.
                  Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
                  HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
                  http://www.dougjensen.com/

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by DrDave View Post

                    As far as gain, I was following your advice from your previous post. Maybe I misunderstood. Yes, you can definitely see it but I switched it in between takes as the sun was going down.
                    I tried the settings on a few of the settings on the FF Sony cams--all the menus were the same, pretty much--and with a bit of tweaking they look very good, thanks.
                    Your settings for the ax700 really give good results.
                    Hi Dave. I have the AX700 and I also invested in Doug Jensen's Master Class which was and still is completely helpful. I'm not getting much time behind the camera these days. Have you posted any of the footage you've shot with the AX700? I wouldn't mind seeing it for some inspiration.

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