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Recommedation On Which Lens Next - FS5 MkII and FX6

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    #16
    Originally posted by ahalpert View Post
    But generally I find that the stills performance heralds video performance in the regards you mention..
    You're completely wrong. They are totally different on professional cameras. Stills needs rapid focus changes that stop moving just as the shutter snaps. Whatever happens just before or after the shot is taken does not matter because no image was captured between snaps. Good stills cameras even have predictive AF that tells the camera to focus where the subject will be when the shutter is open, not where it is when the shutter button is pressed. Video, on the other hand, requires constant, smooooth, focus changes that look organic. And whether you're shooting at 24, 30, 120, 240 fps -- every single frame needs to be sharp.

    You ever shoot wildlife or telephoto sports with a good SLR? If so, you'd quickly see why video and stills are different.

    Further more, stills cameras have had great auto-focus for 15-20 years, but it is only in the last 3-4 years that a few video cameras now have auto-focus that is good enough for professional use in some situations. And being good at one thing doesn't mean it's safe to assume it will good at the other.

    Someone that knows how to shoot pro videos has to be the tester, or else the info isn't credible.
    Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
    HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
    http://www.dougjensen.com/

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      #17
      Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post

      You're completely wrong. They are totally different on professional cameras. Stills needs rapid focus changes that stop moving just as the shutter snaps. Whatever happens just before or after the shot is taken does not matter because no image was captured between snaps. Good stills cameras even have predictive AF that tells the camera to focus where the subject will be when the shutter is open, not where it is when the shutter button is pressed. Video, on the other hand, requires constant, smooooth, focus changes that look organic. And whether you're shooting at 24, 30, 120, 240 fps -- every single frame needs to be sharp.

      You ever shoot wildlife or telephoto sports with a good SLR? If so, you'd quickly see why video and stills are different.

      Further more, stills cameras have had great auto-focus for 15-20 years, but it is only in the last 3-4 years that a few video cameras now have auto-focus that is good enough for professional use in some situations. And being good at one thing doesn't mean it's safe to assume it will good at the other.

      Someone that knows how to shoot pro videos has to be the tester, or else the info isn't credible.
      Sure, but I don't find Sony performance generally differs between stills and video mode. On Canon cameras, I think there's a setting that lets focus gently settle into its final position. (I wish Sony offered this.) But when you're shooting either stills or video on a Sony mirrorless camera with PDAF, the behavior is the same. The camera doesn't care what it's shooting. And while you can't typically observe as many fps from a stills sequence as from a video, you're seeing the same thing.
      www.AbeFilms.com

      All men are brothers

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        #18
        I could see what you're saying with regard to single-shot AF. But when you're using C-AF, I believe the camera behaves the same way regardless of what it's recording.
        www.AbeFilms.com

        All men are brothers

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          #19
          Originally posted by ahalpert View Post
          I could see what you're saying with regard to single-shot AF. But when you're using C-AF, I believe the camera behaves the same way regardless of what it's recording.
          Maybe so, but that is not true for the cameras I use.
          Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
          HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
          http://www.dougjensen.com/

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            #20
            Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post

            Maybe so, but that is not true for the cameras I use.
            You mean the A1 behaves differently when doing c-af in photo vs video mode?
            www.AbeFilms.com

            All men are brothers

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              #21
              Yes. You might not notice it with wide-angle or deep DoF, but with long lenses and shallow DoF, you can see the camera performs differently. In fact, the A1 doesn't even offer all the same settings in each of the two modes. That right there is a clue that there are differences.

              And I will say from my own hands-on experience, that the FX6 auto-focus clearly outperforms the A1 when shooting video.

              My point is that you can't just assume that auto-focus will perform the same when shooting stills or video. Maybe it will, maybe it won't. That's why competent testing by an experienced video shooter, who knows what to look for, is very important.

              And even if it could be shown that a camera performs exactly the same in video and stills mode, you can't conclude that that performance is good enough for video. Something that is good enough for stills might be terrible for video. Lots of DSLRs have great auto-focus for stills, but its not good enough for video. My 5DMIV is a perfect example of that.
              Last edited by Doug Jensen; 02-16-2024, 07:01 AM.
              Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
              HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
              http://www.dougjensen.com/

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                #22
                Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post
                Yes. You might not notice it with wide-angle or deep DoF, but with long lenses and shallow DoF, you can see the camera performs differently. In fact, the A1 doesn't even offer all the same settings in each of the two modes. That right there is a clue that there are differences.

                And I will say from my own hands-on experience, that the FX6 auto-focus clearly outperforms the A1 when shooting video.

                My point is that you can't just assume that auto-focus will perform the same when shooting stills or video. Maybe it will, maybe it won't. That's why competent testing by an experienced video shooter, who knows what to look for, is very important.

                And even if it could be shown that a camera performs exactly the same in video and stills mode, you can't conclude that that performance is good enough for video. Something that is good enough for stills might be terrible for video.
                I see. Looking at YouTube...not a lot of autofocus tests on FX6. I will say that some of what you see in stills tests carries over. If they test a lens and it misses focus on a couple of shots on the running-towards-camera test, then in my experience it will buzz now and then on similar video shots. If it pulses for them sometimes, it pulses for me sometimes. If it switches from the subject to the background, it will do so for me on occasion. But your point is well taken.

                I'm glad that Sigma is switching from their stepping motor. I was very interested in their 35mm f/1.2 but looking at video tests, you could see the focus jumping at discrete intervals through the range. Hopefully their new motor design will ameliorate that, although now that I have a GM 35 I doubt I would switch.

                The only lens still on my wishlist is the hopefully soon-to-be-released Sony GM 85 ii to replace my Samyang 85. I've put the Tamron 35-150 in my shopping cart a few times... But I don't use zooms often enough to justify it. With the new 85, I'll have GM 14/24/35/50/85/135 and that'll cover 98% of my needs.
                www.AbeFilms.com

                All men are brothers

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                  #23
                  I'm sure the GM85 would be a great interview lens. I have the cheaper 85mm f/1.8 and love it.
                  But I opted for the second-generation 70-200mm f/2.8 for interviews because it gives me more versatility when I want to punch in a little tighter, not to mention when shooting other subject matter where a zoom is handy. That lens pretty much lives on my A1. But I do love the 85mm.
                  Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
                  HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
                  http://www.dougjensen.com/

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post
                    I'm sure the GM85 would be a great interview lens. I have the cheaper 85mm f/1.8 and love it.
                    But I opted for the second-generation 70-200mm f/2.8 for interviews because it gives me more versatility when I want to punch in a little tighter, not to mention when shooting other subject matter where a zoom is handy. That lens pretty much lives on my A1. But I do love the 85mm.
                    I've seen testing showing that the 85 f/1.8 has the best autofocus available of any E-mount 85. (...at least in stills mode...) Hopefully the new GM 85 will be just as good or better...

                    The new Sony v2 zooms (70-200 and 24-70) look amazing. I usually have enough time to shoot all my b-roll with primes (at least, with the help of having multiple rigs handy) so I'm not going to bother upgrading from my Sigma 24-70 or Tamron 70-180. At the time I bought them, those lenses performed better than the gen 1 Sony equivalent zooms. Sony lenses have come a long way. I rarely shoot verite/ENG-style but when I do it's usually with the Sigma 24-70. If money were no object, I'd trade that in for the Sony 24-70 v2 and also have the Tamron 35-150 available.
                    www.AbeFilms.com

                    All men are brothers

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by ahalpert View Post
                      If money were no object, I'd trade that in for the Sony 24-70 v2 and also have the Tamron 35-150 available.
                      I bought the new Sony 24-70 last summer and I can confirm it is a wonderful lens that will not disappoint.
                      Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
                      HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
                      http://www.dougjensen.com/

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                        #26
                        This is bleak. Looks like Sony is about to announce a 24-50mm f/2.8 G. I assume the purpose is to be lighter weight than the 24-70... For people who shoot themselves in the face at arm's length. Meanwhile, Canon is over there releasing a 28-70 f/2 and a 24-105 f/2.8...

                        https://www.sonyalpharumors.com/conf...iced-at-1299e/
                        www.AbeFilms.com

                        All men are brothers

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                          #27
                          I shot this with my FX6 and the 24-70mm. 99% AF using face detect and/or subject tracking.

                          Last edited by Doug Jensen; 02-16-2024, 08:21 AM.
                          Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
                          HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
                          http://www.dougjensen.com/

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post
                            I shot this with my FX6 and the 24-70mm. 99% AF using face detect and/or subject tracking.

                            looks nice and sharp. pretty bokeh. low distortion. the reds are a bit saturated to my eye
                            www.AbeFilms.com

                            All men are brothers

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by ahalpert View Post
                              the reds are a bit saturated to my eye
                              Possibly. But I have found that a little oversaturated is what sells best.
                              Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
                              HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
                              http://www.dougjensen.com/

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post

                                I'm interested in hearing if you think auto-focus performs as well with the Sigma as with Sony lenses. What is your experience? Do you have any Sony lenses to compare it to?
                                So far I have only done limited shooting with the Sigma. I've just shot some landscapes and building shots around our neighborhood, so it's hard to really tell how good any tracking might be. It seemed to be holding focus fine but of course I was shooting pretty wide so it was an easy test for the lens to pass. Even using the Sony 24-70 G Master, (which I've only owned since October) I haven't had to really track anything. The focus on it with my Sony FS5 MkII does not seem particularly fast but most of my shooting with it has been interviews and "business environment" b-roll. I know the FX6 will have much better autofocus. THANKS!

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