Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

FX6 - George Floyd Candlelight Vigil

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Other: FX6 - George Floyd Candlelight Vigil

    Just to dispel the rumors that all I ever shoot is rockets and birds, here's something different I shot last night with the FX6. I've got a color version too that I might post, but I really prefer the look of B&W for things like this.

    Lenses: Sony 24-105mm f/4 and 35mm f/1.8
    All shot handheld with Zacuto universal baseplate and Gratical EVF
    Litepanels Brick Bi-color light
    Camera and accessories powered by Anton/Bauer Titon Micro 90 battery and FX6 bracket
    4K @ 120 fps / XAVC-I / S-LOG3 (graded in Resolve)


    Last edited by Doug Jensen; 05-26-2021, 06:03 PM.
    Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
    HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
    http://www.dougjensen.com/

    #2
    [QUOTE=Doug Jensen;1986867249]Just to dispel the rumors that all I ever shoot is rockets and birds, here's something different I shot last night with the FX6. I've got a color version too that I might post, but I really prefer the look of B&W for things like this.

    Lenses: Sony 24-105mm f/4 and 35mm f/1.8
    All shot handheld with Zacuto universal baseplate and Gratical EVF
    Litepanels Brick Bi-color light
    Camera and accessories powered by Anton/Bauer Titon Micro 90 battery and FX6 bracket
    4K @ 120 fps / XAVC-I / S-LOG3 (graded in Resolve)

    Nice one .. does the fx6 have AF in 120fps (S&Q) or just 120p .. looks great

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Donny 123 View Post
      Nice one .. does the fx6 have AF in 120fps (S&Q) or just 120p .. looks great
      Thanks.
      Actually, just to be clear, the FX6 does not have a 120p frequency option. 120 fps is only available with S&Q Motion. I shot this video using the 23.98 frequency setting and S&Q Motion @ 120 fps.

      To answer your question, yes, AF works with S&Q Motion at most frame rates, but not all. 120 is one of the rates where it supposedly works, but I found it very frustrating and I turned off AF completely shortly after I started shooting this video. So most of it was shot in full manual. The AF screwed me over on a couple of shots that would have been really nice had the AF not slipped off the subject and gone to something in the distance. To make matters worse, shooting with 1/5 speed slow-mo just accentuates any errors the camer makes. For example, at a normal 24/30/25 frame rate you might not even notice the AF slip a little and then comeback real fast. But in slow-motion that slip is going to be 5x longer and much more noticable to the viewer -- thus ruining a shot that might have been okay at normal speed. And to make matters worse, the focus slip is not organic looking like it would be if you messed up a little during manual focusing. I don't know why I don't listen to my own advice that . . . AF is not good enough unless you are shooting human beings looking into the camera. Other than that, you are walking on thin ice. Why do I keep trying it and then being disappointed over and over again?

      Supposedly we are only a year or two from totally autonomous self-driving cars, yet we can't even have an AI system on a camera that can look at a scene and know creatively what most professionals would want to be in focus. Nevermind what is the biggest object in the scene, or the closest thing to the camera, or at the center of the frame -- those are not always the correct things to focus on. In any given situation, I'll bet 90% of professional camera operators are going to agree on WHAT should be in focus at any given moment, yet the camera has no clue. Just a dumb machine. End of rant.
      Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
      HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
      http://www.dougjensen.com/

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post

        Supposedly we are only a year or two from totally autonomous self-driving cars, yet we can't even have an AI system on a camera that can look at a scene and know creatively what most professionals would want to be in focus. Nevermind what is the biggest object in the scene, or the closest thing to the camera, or at the center of the frame -- those are not always the correct things to focus on. In any given situation, I'll bet 90% of professional camera operators are going to agree on WHAT should be in focus at any given moment, yet the camera has no clue. Just a dumb machine. End of rant.
        That's not a rant. I just shot a corporate workshop, you know the kind, a large floor packed with round tables, trainees engaging among themselves in leadership exercises. I moved between people and tables with an 85mm f/1.4 portrait length on sticks, the other shooter shot wide from a gimbal with AF. His shots were flowing and sharp, but the only message conveyed was the technique of fluid motion itself. On the other hand, each shot of mine told part of the client's story. Up to 2-4 people in the frame but only 1 in focus at any time. As the conversation would migrate from one person to another, so was the focus.

        There is no continuous AF that can track conversations between people sharing the frame. And even if there was, I don't understand why people would be so quick to delegate to automation a learned skill of the cameraman that non-pros will not have mastered. That's the essence of your value. Anybody who knows anything about corporate knows they don't hire you to do what they could just as easily do without you; they have access to the same tools. The expectation they have is that you know some things, can do better because you are expert in your craft.

        Comment


          #5
          ^ +1 on that Tom. Well said.

          Comment


            #6
            Yes Tom, I agree completely. I think manual focusing is one of those things that separates the men from the boys. And quite often the boys don't even understand the pleasure of a fully manual focus lens or a really good viewfinder, and how those things change the whole game.
            Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
            HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
            http://www.dougjensen.com/

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post
              Yes Tom, I agree completely. I think manual focusing is one of those things that separates the men from the boys. And quite often the boys don't even understand the pleasure of a fully manual focus lens or a really good viewfinder, and how those things change the whole game.
              Theres no beating a manual pull ..

              Comment


                #8
                We're still talking about lenses, right? :-)
                Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
                HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
                http://www.dougjensen.com/

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Doug Jensen View Post
                  Yes Tom, I agree completely. I think manual focusing is one of those things that separates the men from the boys. And quite often the boys don't even understand the pleasure of a fully manual focus lens or a really good viewfinder, and how those things change the whole game.
                  The VF thing has baffled me for years, now. A good VF is worth it’s weight in gold. Maybe it’s just because I came up shooting with real, large EVF’s, but I just don’t get how some people today shoot with these tiny, literal thumbnail sized VF’s(if you can call them that) that only tilt one way or running around outside in the sun with a 5”-7” monitor hanging an inch from their face.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Very nice, Doug.

                    Do you have a picture of the camera rigged out for this kind of handheld work? I've seen you post images of it on sticks before but I'm curious to see this setup (if it's different).

                    Also, from a logistical standpoint: are you asking permission/getting releases beforehand or is there some understanding that media will be present?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'll try to post of a photo of my handheld rig. I think it has probably evolved a little bit from anything I might have posted earlier.

                      No, I don't get any releases or special permission. It is public park and a public event. Surprisingly there were quite a few TV cameras and reporters there -- almost more cameras than participants. They pretty much stayed on their sticks the whole ttime and I just made sure to stay out of their shots and keep them out of my shots as I moved around the event. I purposely didn't even bring a tripod so I would be forced to get in close and move the camera around. I did edit in it one shot of a cameraman doing the interviewing too. Budgets must be tight at the local TV stations. I spoke to the origanizers after the event and I'm going to give them copies of the footage and they can do whatever they want with it. I like to hand over organizations free footage whenever they say they can use it. I'm happy to see them get some milage out rather than it all just disappearing onto my hard drives. A few shots will get re-purposed as stock footage, too, but mostly I shot it because I enjoyed doing it.
                      Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
                      HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
                      http://www.dougjensen.com/

                      Comment


                        #12
                        This is my typical handheld setup. It is nice, compact and rock solid with no loose stuff swinging around when I move. It feels as close to a shoulder-mount ENG camera as I can build for a FF cinema camera.
                        The whole rig just drops into the case fully built. It weighs in at a nice 14 pounds including the light.

                        FX6
                        Sony 24-105mm f/4
                        Zacuto OLED viewfinder
                        Anton/Bauer FX6 battery bracket
                        Anton/Bauer Titon Micro 90 v-mount battery
                        Litepanels Bi-Color Brick LED light
                        Sony ECM-MS2 short shotgun
                        Zacuto Universal Baseplate
                        Ergo Cine wooden grips
                        Sony RM-1BP remote

                        Sachtler Aktiv8 head and Flowtech75 legs.

                        FX6_jensen1.jpg
                        Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
                        HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
                        http://www.dougjensen.com/

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Looks great. Powerful images in there. Iím in full agreement about the AF in 120. I just shot an Olympic profile. The AF was beautiful for the sit down, but I had to go manual for broll because the AF is absolutely nuts. I donít understand how the AF wants to focus on a person who is 20 feet behind the subject, fully out of focus and barely a blob. After seeing that once I pulled the ring on the 28-135 back and went full manual. I also love that itís stabilized cause I was able to whip it hard and it looks very controlled.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I like that natty pan bar ,have the same tripod/ head .. great but whats with that too long pan bar ?? thinking of sawing the thing off but still need some sort of handle I guess ..

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Donny 123 View Post
                              I like that natty pan bar ,have the same tripod/ head .. great but whats with that too long pan bar ?? thinking of sawing the thing off but still need some sort of handle I guess ..
                              I made the custom pan handle out of this:
                              https://www.irwin.com/tools/screwdri...n-1-nut-driver

                              The diameter is the same as the stock pan bar, so you can take the rosette knob off the original and mount it on the Irwin. It's shorter, fattter, and got a nice knurled rubber grip. I've suggested to Sachtler many times that they need to offer a shorter handle, but they haven't done it yet. But a lot of people sure notice mine and say they like it better. It is especially effecive with cameras like the Z280, Z90, S1H, etc. that have the viewfinder at the rear instead of the side upfront.
                              Doug Jensen, Sony camcorder instructor
                              HOW TO MAKE MONEY SHOOTING STOCK
                              http://www.dougjensen.com/

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X