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    Arri & Lowel

    I know Lowel can't compare to Arri. However, if I got a couple of Omni's, barndoors, stands, dimmers etc...Do you think I can get good results? Or save up for Arri's? This is for movie production....
    Make It Happen
    www.lancejrehaphotography.com
    www.lakefilms.com

    #2
    Lowels will definitely get the job done. The Arris are a bit more flexible, but if you can't afford them right now, the Lowels will do a good job for you.
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      #3
      I've seen great results from scoop lights when in the hands of somebody who knows what they are doing. Don't get caught up in the tools. Concentrate on making your tools work for you. I've shot scenes for features using a Lowel Omni, a china lantern and a halogen spot light in a socket that turned out great.

      Scott
      Scott Spears
      Emmy Winning Cinematographer
      www.scottspears.net

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        #4
        I have said this on here before and I will say it again, Lowels like all tools will serve you well if you take care of them, they are ligghtweight and easy to use and transport. Scott is right on the money. Get a few good instruments and learn to use them to the max so they harmonize wtih your camera skills. Some great stuff has been shot with "kinda kinos" and an mr16 with black wrap punched full of holes. But know that you will probably always say to yourself..."man if I had a _________ it would be perfect for this" good luck!
        Brian Murphy
        Montreal-Ottawa-Toronto
        Sony FS5 MKII-Sony FX-6 (on order) - Sony PXW-Z150 -Sony A7iii -Sony A6400/A6000
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        Sigma 24-70/F2.8 Art
        Collection of CY lenses and vintage Nikons, Canons.
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          #5
          I agree; Lowel can give you EXCELLENT results. I'd recommend their DVPro kits for a starter kit; i got mine with barndoors, stands, filters, an umbrella and bulbs. 4 light set all in one hefty 50 lb case. Perfect partner for my DVX. Just remember, its about how you USE your tools, not the tool itself. While Arris are wonderful, its always good to start out with something a bit cheaper and simpler, develop your skills, then move up later.

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            #6
            I use both Arris and Lowels. The Lowels are fine and with the right lighting control tools can offer excellent results.

            Grip equipment is typically not used enough or used correctly by people who are inexperienced at lighting. I suggest a 50/50% rule between grip and lighting gear when budgeting. Yes, you need lights but you also need lighting stands, sandbags, barndoors, scrims, flags, gels, cinefoil, grip clips, clothes pins, boom poles, C-Stands, silks, nets, solids, etc.

            If you can afford Arris, both in cost and in weight and size, they are superior to the Lowels but you can get just as good results with Lowels. Nobody will look at your setup and say, "wow, bet he used Lowels instead of Arris".

            I agree with everyone else in this thread, it's much more about what you can do than what you use.

            Dan
            It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
            G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.

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              #7
              The nice thing about lowels, is that since they are the 'starter' light. People are ALWAYS upgrading, so, you can always find them used for cheap. craigslist here in SF always has cheap lowels. Once, for $400 I scored 2 totas, 2 omnis, 5 stands, 2 c-stands, a solid, a silk, a set of road rags and a green screen with a stand.

              Invariably, once you start buying lights, you are going to buying them for the rest of your life, because you'll always need one more bulb or one more c-stand, or 17 sand bags.
              01.PRODUCTIONS
              www.01productions.com

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                #8
                Originally posted by puredrifting
                . . . I suggest a 50/50% rule between grip and lighting gear when budgeting. Yes, you need lights but you also need lighting stands, sandbags, barndoors, scrims, flags, gels, cinefoil, grip clips, clothes pins, boom poles, C-Stands, silks, nets, solids, etc.
                How true. You don't hear that often, but how true.

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                  #9
                  The first bit of money I saved I actually bought grip gear instead of buying lights knowing that I could generate light from a variety of sources but that trimming and controlling was super important. I ended up buying a couple of c-stands, bags, matthelini's, baby baseplates, 18x24 nets and flags, 2 4x4 floppies.
                  www.barrycheong.com

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                    #10
                    C-stands are crazy. They have so many uses. You never realize how cool they are until you get to use them on a regular basis.
                    sigpic

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                      #11
                      yeah, the one thing I haven't bit the bullet on yet is cardellini's they are so friggen expensive and impossible to find used.
                      01.PRODUCTIONS
                      www.01productions.com

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                        #12
                        Im from the uk, Im going to shoot indian weddings where the bride and groom are on a stage for a long time> I also might do comercials and short films.

                        Iam thinking of buying the lowel dv creator 55. is this good for me?

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