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So what advice would you give to someone . . .

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    So what advice would you give to someone . . .

    Who wants to tell a story with his prized DVX camera. However, he'll be filming in the dark and will need to artificially light everything. The dilemma is that I don't have any experience in lighting . . . I tried reading other posts but the jargon was too advanced.

    So, I hate to ask someone to guide me through every step to lighting in the dark while holding my hand . . . That response would be greatly appreciated. If you don't feel like elaborating, point me to a book so I can learn the lingo and decipher the threads on this board.

    Thanks!

    -Sean


    #2
    "Lighting for Digital Video & Television" by John Jackman. Read it cover to cover and you will be good to go. I refer back to it all the time after reading it. Its a must buy for someone just getting into lighting. Check out amazon.com.

    Luke

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      #3
      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846

      A second edition, very cool. Has anyone checked out the extra features?

      Luke

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        #4
        Get a gaffer or DP to help you out in the begining. Even a recent films school grad. You will learn tons, then you can decide if you want to hire them again, or if you think you can do it on your own. If you have a story that you really want to tell, then you probably want to do it right, do it justice.

        -j

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          #5
          Buy some lights at home depot, and practice in the dark area. Theres really no wrong or right way, the more you practice the more you will find what YOU think looks good.
          "If it ain't helpin' your story, get rid of it" -Michael Bay lol I think he meant blow it up and shoot it from 8 different angles in slow motion.

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            #6
            You should also check out the Set Lighting Technicians Handbook by Harry C. Box (unfortunate name, I know) It is pretty much the industry standard in terms of lighting handbooks. I know some people that used the handbook to fill in the blanks when they were taking their tests to get into the electricians Union. Otherwise I agree with the above post that you should get a D.P. You really will probably want to use one in the future as well, but as someone with little experience lighting and shooting, their advice and expertise would be invaluable to you.
            Justin Talley
            Director of Photography
            323.353.8977
            FS100 - 7D - 5DMkII - 16 BolexPro - Bell & Howell Filmo - HVX200
            Nikon AIS Primes, Tokina 11-16 Zoom, Redrock, Zacuto, Genus and the rest
            profnoxin@gmail.com
            www.jtalleydp.com

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