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  • Filthy
    replied
    Getting into a copter that's built to handle a proper camera (BMPCC or otherwise) is much more involved than most people think. I'd advise against it if this will be your first aerial platform. I've owned and flown just over a dozen different platforms over the past 7 years of flying professionally - from pre Phantom 1's to custom built heavy lifters. I can tell you that it's a lot to take on if you're not flying full time. Battery education, management, storage, gimbal options and tuning, camera control, copter tweaking, setup and breakdown time, etc. There are of course some distinct advantages as well. But if you're just getting into aerial, the ready to fly route is generally the way to go for now. DJI has it's own issues. But no company, app or platform is perfect. Just comes down to finding the best match to suit your particular needs. Between the 2 birds you mentioned earlier, the Mavic 2 Pro is the better choice for video. The P4pro takes better photos (partially due to the mechanical shutter). But the flight and gimbal performance isn't as good. The gimbal can exhibit micro vibes in higher winds. This is especially noticeable when flying backwards at full throttle in anything more than breeze. You can also get props or landing gear in shots often depending on camera angles. The Mavic2pro is more portable, quieter, handles wind a tad better, and does decent enough 10bit video that can be cut with other cameras (provided exposure and other settings are correct). Giving pretty much full camera control from their app is simpler solution for a 1 man op.
    Last edited by Filthy; 11-24-2020, 12:32 AM.

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  • NorBro
    replied
    Yeah, drones for third-party cameras are still expensive. Maybe there is something out there that I don't know about it, but I don't think so.

    There are several options that are made for interchangeable cameras (that the company making the drone sells) that maybe will eventually have other adapter systems or "frames" as they call them.

    Something like below with a future attachment. (In its current state, it's only usable with the company's options. DIY isn't safe and never recommended for drones.)

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...ame_st16s.html

    Leave a comment:


  • David Evans
    replied
    Thanks NorBro. My initial idea was to get a drone (didn't even had to have a camera) that could fly a pocket cinema camera, but I can't seem to find one (at least not at these price points). Any suggestions?

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  • NorBro
    replied
    In theory, 10-bit should be better because it's more of something that's part of a recipe in creating an image, but the quality from those particular drones is already so questionable that it's moot, IMO (and I know they keep improving).

    And not all specs are created equally. There is something called "good HD" or "good 10-bit", etc.

    Like the new iPhone is 10-bit, but it looks pretty mediocre. Whereas a 2K 10-bit image from a camera made 10 years ago looks robust and just pleasant.

    I'm also a realist and not much of a creative/artist anymore and I'd also ask how many drone shots are you planning on using? Just a few seconds here and there for establishing shots or is it like a film documentary on forests?

    If it's for a few seconds here and there, will anyone care? Like does it really matter? (If it really does then I'd also consider options which can hold cameras so then you'd have a much better product.)

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  • David Evans
    replied
    Originally posted by NorBro View Post
    A higher-resolution with proper processing and a healthy bitrate is much more important for this particular hardware (especially with smaller sensors).

    8-bit, 10-bit...it's the last thing you'd see with your own eyes in an IQ.

    P.S. Maybe see what Sony's up to too...

    https://www.cined.com/sony-launches-...oject-airpeak/
    Thanks. But what about its uses for indie filmmaking where you'd want to grade and take the footage into a specific direction?

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  • NorBro
    replied
    A higher-resolution with proper processing and a healthy bitrate is much more important for this particular hardware (especially with smaller sensors).

    8-bit, 10-bit...it's the last thing you'd see with your own eyes in an IQ.

    P.S. Maybe see what Sony's up to too...

    https://www.cined.com/sony-launches-...oject-airpeak/

    Leave a comment:


  • David Evans
    replied
    Hey guys,

    For filmmaking, what would be the right choice between the Phantom 4 pro v2.0 and the Mavic 2 pro? I've read the IQ on the Phantom is better but shouldn't the Mavic have the upper hand with 10-bit color vs the 8-bit on the Phantom?

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Greg_E
    replied
    I won't buy a DJI because of the poor support, had one once, had a problem, got the run around... Talking to one of our former students who makes a substantial amount of his living with their higher end quad copters, and he says support is the same for him. Think he is still flying Inspire 2 and the best camera offered for that machine.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zim
    replied
    Originally posted by scorsesefan View Post
    Looks like they added 24fps, manual shutter speed and WB for the mini in an April firmware update: https://forum.dji.com/thread-213266-1-1.html
    That is good to hear.

    Leave a comment:


  • scorsesefan
    replied
    Originally posted by mcbob View Post
    They're not that expensive (depending on the model) and are a good bit of kit to have.

    On the other hand, most decent models are made in China, and due to political developments it may soon become very difficult to get dependable support (not that it's very easy to begin with... my Mavic Air developed sudden violent left turns, and I cannot get them to respond to my submitted ticket for the life of me).
    Starting to see what you mean. It takes forever to get in touch with them -- calling or online support!

    Leave a comment:


  • scorsesefan
    replied
    Originally posted by ahalpert View Post
    I've always been really impressed by the DR on my Phantom 4 and on every DJI drone I see.

    Did you blow your highlights? I feel like it's really easy to overexpose because it can be really hard to see what you're getting. I see a lot of overexposed drone footage. I always try really hard to squint and make sure I'm still getting detail in the highlights and pull the exposure down to get it.
    Yeah, I was flying without ND filters in manual mode so there's no way to control aperture (it's fixed 2.8) except for lowering ISO/raising shutter speed. I wanted to keep the shutter at 48 (@24fps) as an experiment to see if I could get "cinematic" footage with the drone. I also shot in auto mode and I wasn't too crazy about the higher shutter speeds (the Gopro also does this as it is fixed aperture, too). I'll have to do a run with ND filters and see what I get.

    BTW does anyone know how the Mavic Mini meters? It looks like a spot meter the way it dealt with a tree line where half of the trees were in sun and the other half shade...

    Leave a comment:


  • ahalpert
    replied
    I've always been really impressed by the DR on my Phantom 4 and on every DJI drone I see.

    Did you blow your highlights? I feel like it's really easy to overexpose because it can be really hard to see what you're getting. I see a lot of overexposed drone footage. I always try really hard to squint and make sure I'm still getting detail in the highlights and pull the exposure down to get it.

    Leave a comment:


  • scorsesefan
    replied
    So I took this out for my first flight today. Impressed, but you really have to nail the exposure in-camera. DR is not terrible but not too impressive. Is the dynamic range of the Mavic Air 2 any better with its flat profile or do you have to go straight to the Mavic Pro 2 to get a more flexible picture for post?

    Leave a comment:


  • scorsesefan
    replied
    Originally posted by AndreeOnline View Post
    Drone ND filters are often sold as a kit, and I think it's good idea to get more than one 'theoretical' filter.

    The sensors in drones are pretty sensitive to changes in light and have limited dynamic range, so your window for perfect exposure is pretty narrow. And once the drone is up it's "gone". The batteries don't last forever, so you will likely not want to fly back and forth and micro manage your setup.

    That said, while you can certainly use a drone as a "camera on a virtual tripod or slider" that flies close to people and objects, more often you will shoot stuff that is farther away. In this mode, objects don't move so quickly across the screen and your footage is less sensitive to 'cheating the shutter' and using let's say 1/100 or 1/200 of a second.

    If you're truly a purist and want none of that—just disregard. You images will likely be a bit softer than most other drone footage, but that can be a good thing too.

    But if we extend the thought of cheating the shutter we realise that if you're shooting at 1/200 you might as well be shooting at 1/800. Any motion blur is gone anyway, if you're in aerial mode. Yes, but if the sun is out and your shutter is too fast, you might start to pick up prop shadow in the frame (depends on drone). So some base ND is always good.

    Anyway, try to get a set while your familiarising yourself with it.
    Thanks for the info. Interesting point about it being less sensitive to cheating the shutter. I'm used to things here on the ground and doubling your frame rate for shutter speed so I'll have to experiment...

    Leave a comment:


  • AndreeOnline
    replied
    Drone ND filters are often sold as a kit, and I think it's good idea to get more than one 'theoretical' filter.

    The sensors in drones are pretty sensitive to changes in light and have limited dynamic range, so your window for perfect exposure is pretty narrow. And once the drone is up it's "gone". The batteries don't last forever, so you will likely not want to fly back and forth and micro manage your setup.

    That said, while you can certainly use a drone as a "camera on a virtual tripod or slider" that flies close to people and objects, more often you will shoot stuff that is farther away. In this mode, objects don't move so quickly across the screen and your footage is less sensitive to 'cheating the shutter' and using let's say 1/100 or 1/200 of a second.

    If you're truly a purist and want none of thatójust disregard. You images will likely be a bit softer than most other drone footage, but that can be a good thing too.

    But if we extend the thought of cheating the shutter we realise that if you're shooting at 1/200 you might as well be shooting at 1/800. Any motion blur is gone anyway, if you're in aerial mode. Yes, but if the sun is out and your shutter is too fast, you might start to pick up prop shadow in the frame (depends on drone). So some base ND is always good.

    Anyway, try to get a set while your familiarising yourself with it.

    Leave a comment:

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