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Anybody use the CX350 as a Webcam Yet? I can't get it to work...

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  • Bassman2003
    replied
    Yes, it is outside the usual usage of normal people. If they do use anything sustained it is to watch video (download) and that can be variable without people even noticing. It seems nobody likes uploads when it comes to bandwidth. I remember back in the DSL days when only download speeds were quoted and uploads were basically non-existent. And, "speeds" are often talked about, not sustained speeds. In many ways, the deck is stacked against consumer level live streaming.

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  • NorBro
    replied
    Hey, that sounds like something the cartel would do!

    But can it be...having financial interest over providing a proper service or product?

    ___

    That is actually a very great point; sustained internet speeds.

    Something less than 1% think about because it's not a common task to be using your maximum up/down all day.

    It would be interesting to test.

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  • Bassman2003
    replied
    I have found that the perpetual battle (probably even with 5G when it arrives) is with the carriers and data throttling. They have a financial interest to not give out the data. I was filming a baseball game out a ways from town and after the third inning we were bumped down to 3G. That is why I do not want streaming to stay around as a fad. It is just a mess in ways we have no control over. Even indoor wifi can be total crap.

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  • NorBro
    replied
    For HD, many will be able to drop the wires in a year or two or so in most major locations.

    All we need is just a bit more speed (5G and beyond).

    People will continue to update their phones and buildings.

    Not sure where you're located but several companies down here by me in NY - before the pandemic - were already streaming high school sports with iPads (obviously ones with a phone plan in them).

    Any connection issues/drop outs weren't the problem; it was the device that was being used by inexperienced students and staff not knowing the basics of videography and how to film sports (but they were saving money and providing a live feed for parents at work so it was all good).

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  • Bassman2003
    replied
    You are correct. Nothing is very practical in streaming outside of a wired land line!

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  • NorBro
    replied
    Actually going to backtrack a bit...my optimism is based on if you have unlimited data and preferably a 5G phone. lol

    At the end of the day it's nice like you said, but this method won't be too practical for extended streaming in everyone's life.

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  • NorBro
    replied
    Yeah, no doubt about it - but at those lower data rates like the e.g. aforementioned trivial 20mbps it's effortless for the phone.

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  • Bassman2003
    replied
    I see what you saying. I agree, it is a nice feature they added. Most of us would prefer a wired connection for anything when it comes to streaming stability.

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  • NorBro
    replied
    But not with the new USB tethering (it will have one cable but it will have a wireless connection after that)...that's what I am trying to say.

    The camera is being hardwired to a network - the phone, your phone, which you can velcro to the camera.

    Think of the phone as a router or modem in your house.

    The camera is hooked up to the phone through one USB cable through its native USB port, and then can stream in remote locations (provided that your phone has a strong signal or at least enough bars for it to work decently well).

    This isn't exactly 100% wireless, but no adapter is necessary in this case.

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  • Bassman2003
    replied
    One still needs that wireless adapter for any kind of wireless signal out from the camera. So nothing has changed from FW in that area. They have added SRT (which I am not familiar with) and along the way created this virtual USB driver for direct webcam type connections. I use the Mighty Wifi device for my laptop to get internet so I can stream through OBS. I am pretty sure you could hook up straight from the camera (with the USB dongle) if wanted.

    The 'extended beta' type of camera releases are kind of a mess these days. I would say this camera was "finished" 1-1/2 - 2 years after being for sale on the market. This tells me Panasonic is starved for resources in the broadcast camera division. But they make nice cameras so we put up with it. I wonder if they will stay with this camera (CX350) or make a slighter better version at a higher price point? Sort of like the two Canon's XF700 & XF650. I have a lot of football games coming up so I will be continuing to dial it in for high contrast scenes (its weak point imho).

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  • NorBro
    replied
    I guess the camera should have shipped with that FW so you/people wouldn't have had to pay for the adapter, the device, and the data. [facepalm]

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  • Bassman2003
    replied
    Panasonic sells a wireless adapter than plugs into the same USB port for remote control or wireless streaming. The camera does not have any internal wireless capability. I use a device called Mighty Wifi which I buy time on which can do 20mbps up & down for hotspot work.

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  • NorBro
    replied
    The camera control isn't wireless like in many other cameras? (It should be.)

    It looks like the USB is for hooking up (tethering) the camera to the phone to use its network for live streaming when you don't have another means like a hard connection or WiFi.

    I don't know how many other cameras do that, but that's an excellent idea as it's essentially using the phone as a hotspot like everyone does with their phones and laptops out-and-about when WiFi isn't available (I used to do this so much years ago).

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  • Bassman2003
    replied
    Thanks for trying to help. I learned that the "USB Tethering" option is over the USB 2.0 port and is used for forms of camera control on a phone or tablet. The camera also has a USB 3 port which I first thought went along with the Virtual USB driver since the PDF setup guide made no mention of streaming output ports, IP addresses or anything network related. It seemed it was going to be plug and play but the feature is really an extension of the existing streaming LAN functions. The documentation is pretty slim but since there are limited menu items, I tweaked them until I had a winner.

    I like this setup as it transfers a clean feed to the computer. So I can leave the HDMI output characters on for my preview monitor. With the capture cards you need to turn everything off for a clean feed.

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  • NorBro
    replied
    I didn't want to keep going on about it yesterday, but there were a few things not making sense to me like why an IP would be asked for with USB, and every FW documentation I came across talked about phones with the USB tethering (which I still don't understand what the CX350 does with them but probably something with a network connection), and also if the CX350 truly supported streaming via USB - but glad you figured it out.

    The only time I've ever streamed via Ethernet was with Z Cams and they have some nice software you can use to set up and control the cameras.

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