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    Adobe Premiere Pro Timeline Question

    I have an export question. If I have shot video at 720 30p and I want to output to standard def DVD Should I:

    1. Start a standard def 720 X 480 Widescreen timeline and just resize the high def video footage througout the whole movie or:
    2. Start a 720p timeline and in export make it 720 X 480 or:
    3. use the crop/resize final output to 720X480

    I obviously want the best looking footage also if I HAVE to render it anyway should I export to an MPEG so that Encore doesn't have to transcode AGAIN or just make it an AVI and transcode within Encore.

    Thanks for all your help!! Aj

    #2
    Edit in a 720p timeline, and export 720p. That way you have a high quality master.

    Bring it into Encore... Encore should do the downscaling for you. This is the cheapest and simplest option, but I've found Encore to be only 'meh' in terms of quality. Assuming you have After Effects, follow this guide to get a good quality down-conversion. http://www.hd4pc.com/techblog/2008/1...nition-to-dvd/

    Another option is to buy TMPEGnc. It's about $100, but it does an extremely good job in my opinion of converting HD footage to SD. It will also convert it into DVD format a lot faster than Encore will, and the quality qwill be a bit better than the AE method. http://tmpgenc.pegasys-inc.com/en/product/te4xp.html

    You can do it in Premiere, but again I've found the downscaling to be 'meh'. That said, I do it weekly in Premiere... but it's for a weekly church video for the web and they aren't that picky about quality. Not saying it looks bad by any stretch, but it isn't something I'd give a paying client.

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      #3
      I'm in this boat, but with footage from my Canon 7D. I found that rendering from Premiere Pro CS5 to MPEG2-DVD and then importing footage into Encore CS5 resulted in MUCH better DVD quality. With HD to DVD all in Encore, there was way more artifacts and detail loss... I'm re-encoding my entire timeline this way. I believe you can also skip the transcoding phase in Encore this way as well...

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        #4
        Don't let Encore do the transcoding for you.
        Shoot HD, Edit HD, Export to AME, create a Full Res HD. Now you have a Digital Master.
        Then create a DVD ready file. Import that into Encore.
        Chris Tompkins

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          #5
          Premiere CS5 and Encore both uses the MainConcept MPEG engine. It only creates acceptable result in high bitrate.

          The rule of thumb is to reduce the time to transcode as much as possible. Thus, if you don't intent to use other encoder, using dynamic link to export from Premiere timeline to Encore will give you the best result (consider no other encoder is used). Or just export from Premiere using AME to DVD MPEG-2 files. Then import to Encore.

          I use Procoder to create MPEG-2 DVD compliant video. I can get great result even at 3mbps. But procoder is not cheap.

          I did similar to Videoatlanta suggested. I edit in HD and export to HD AVI files. You can download the Matrox AVI codec. It's a high quality professional intemediate codec which is used to be locked for Matrox hardware to use. Now you can just export to 1920x1080 Microsoft AVI usiing Matrox HD codec. I have a link in my blog. http://lacoloronline.com/blog/?10041-Matrox-I-Frame-Intermedia-HD-Codec

          Or you can invest in NeoScene for $100 so you can export to Cineform codec too.

          With that intermediate AVI file, you can use other encoder to create DVD compliant MPEG-2 files to import to Encore for authoring. Make sure the mpeg file shows "Don't transcode" in project pane.
          LA Color Wedding | L.A. Color Blog

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