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SD card advice for AF100

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  • Tyrant Lizard
    replied
    Thank you, Barry, always a pleasure to have a direct response from you.

    Do you describe this method in your book? If so I'll just read it and follow your instructions. I remember you saying to import the entire card, and not just bits and pieces of it, to ensure integrity. Maybe I did that wrong this time. I've important several hours and hours of footage before and this is the first time something like this has happened.

    Thank you again,

    Leave a comment:


  • Barry_Green
    replied
    I use the media browser on cs5 win. I dont have cs6 or the Mac, but I can't see why it would be different. Go to the media browser, navigate to the card, it should recognize the AVCHD structure and display a list of clip names and thumbnails. You shouldn't be able to see different halves of the clip, it should only present you with one combined clip.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave Rochelle
    replied
    Barry -

    Do you know how exactly to do this in Premiere Pro CS6 (Mac)? I've read your book & tried everything I can think of to get them seen as one unified clip but to no avail. I've tried dragging files into the project window - both from the finder and from the media browser... and have tried using file -> import as well... but have never gotten large takes like that to combine seamlessly. Thus I always end up patching them together & "covering" the edit as best I can.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barry_Green
    replied
    There was nothing wrong with your card and there was no glitch. If you import the footage through the device explorer, Vegas will know how to stitch the clips together seamlessly. The problem you ran into happens when you don't import the clips using the proper AVCHD import function.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tyrant Lizard
    replied
    Howdy guys, hope everyone is well!

    I have a question here regarding a glitch in an SD Card.

    I was shooting on a 32GB, 400xSpeed Lexar Pro SD card in my AF100 the other day. I've probably used and formatted that card at least 3 or 4 times (always in the AF100)

    I was shooting a conversation that took place for about 45 minutes. About 30 minutes into it, the card glitched, lost audio for 1 frame and kept recording. I noticed this when I threw it into my editing software (Sony Vegas Pro 11) and it came in as two separate film strips.

    I was able to patch it together alright, but still this gives me pause on the issue of using the card again.

    What do you guys think? Just a bad card, used too many times? Should I throw it away, re-shoot something to test it or what?

    The shooting conditions were not at all harsh. In an air conditioned room on a tripod, no big deal. My camera's been to the beach before and on the ocean, but I am extremely careful with weather proofing it and protecting and cleaning it, so I don't think that is an issue (I've filmed a lot with it since the beach and ocean and have had no problems).

    This is the first glitch with the AF100 that I've experienced since owning it approximately 1 year.

    Thank you guys,

    Leave a comment:


  • Freya
    replied
    Originally posted by joshuajay View Post
    Ok So I feel a bit stupid, especially having read the opening thread. But I think I might have bought a counterfeit or dud card as when I put it in my Panasonic Ag-Af100 it says check card and won't let me record. Is there something I am missing, or have I just bought a crappy card. I'm afraid it was off e-bay.... it did only cost me 25 (for 64gb).... and it's made by a brand I've never heard of Busbi, who I am now going to Google. Any help for this newcomer greatly appreciated.
    First up NEVER buy memory cards off e-bay. Known loads of ppl to come unstuck with that.

    Secondly I use Busbi cards all the time. They sell them at Play.com, but I don't have an af101 and I only ever use the 16gb cards on account of them being sdhc and not sdxc cards.

    Your card could be a fake. It's easy to put a sticker on there or it might just need reformatting if it is second hand.

    Have you tried it in a card reader on a PC or anything?

    love

    Freya

    Leave a comment:


  • joshuajay
    replied
    Check Card message on Ag-af100

    Ok So I feel a bit stupid, especially having read the opening thread. But I think I might have bought a counterfeit or dud card as when I put it in my Panasonic Ag-Af100 it says check card and won't let me record. Is there something I am missing, or have I just bought a crappy card. I'm afraid it was off e-bay.... it did only cost me 25 (for 64gb).... and it's made by a brand I've never heard of Busbi, who I am now going to Google. Any help for this newcomer greatly appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • Babu
    replied
    I have no clue. I just pop it into my standard SDHC reader and go on editing.

    Leave a comment:


  • taras4444
    replied
    Awesome, so either way i might as well get the uhs-1 card, i cant believe its almost half the price! Are there any compatibility issues with it though, or should it work in most sd card holders on laptops etc? If so how do you find out if your sd card reader works for uhs1? (My sd card port doesnt mention uhs1)

    Leave a comment:


  • Babu
    replied
    I had Sandisk Class 6 cards and Sandisk uhs-1 cards. The uhs-1 cards format in mere seconds in the AF100 where as my sandisk class 6 format in minutes -____- How fast do your lexar 32's format in? If it's minutes then yes you'll see a difference upgrading the cards, if not then you won't notice any difference in the AF100.

    Leave a comment:


  • taras4444
    replied
    Hey just a quick question, is there any major difference between sdhc cards and sdhc uhs-1 cards except for price? Because I currently have the lexar sdhc 32gb cards, and was going to buy another but found the following uhs-1 for a much cheaper price! And seeing as from what I've heard the uhs-1 is better and faster, it just doesnt seem to make sense why its nearly half the price! Should I go for it or am i missing a trick? The card link is the following:
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lexar-32GB-P...4682553&sr=8-3 and the normal one is :
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lexar-32GB-1...4682553&sr=8-5
    Both are class 10 and everything :S Thanks for any advice.

    Leave a comment:


  • seanwin
    replied
    Great post and advice, thanks barry

    Leave a comment:


  • maxusa
    replied
    Originally posted by groveChuck View Post
    Does SDHC have a typical life span, like P2 does?
    Measurable main theoretical limit is the number of NAND block cell write cycles. It changes among flash manufacturers, technology, organization, controller algorythms, etc. Then we have factors that are difficult to predict such as storage and operating environment, human factor (handling), reenergizing frequency, etc. All things being equal, the P2 packaging is more durable (can withstand more insertions and rougher handling). A P2 card is a professionally packaged flash, whereas SD cards have light/consumer grade packaging where miniature size and affordability trumps many other requirements. Some SD card makers have ruggedized offerings such as sealed epoxy and/or reinforced casings. So a given SD card life span depends on usage and many other factors.

    By the end of last decade, MLC NAND flash would typically sustain 5-10K write cycles. The latest MLC flash from Intel/Micron can hold up to 30K cycles. Over time, and with technological advances, flash becomes better, smaller, and cheaper. An old SD card, therefore, is unlikely to be able to sustain as many write cycles as a modern equivalent. Having said that, SD cards do require TLC (Pelican, anyone?), but the risks can be somewhat offset by following best practices and using professional name brands that typically carry lifetime warranty.

    Leave a comment:


  • groveChuck
    replied
    Originally posted by maxusa View Post
    I have seen many statistical studies of electronics parts and machinery that show much higher probability of failure (100~1000x) at the initial minutes/hours/days and then again approaching the end of useful life. Note that the end of life may be well beyond a warranty period.
    That's what I thought was the case. I'll see if I can find some actual studies.
    Does SDHC have a typical life span, like P2 does? Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • ullanta
    replied
    Originally posted by grimrebes View Post
    If I am paying $10 or $20 or even $40 for a card and billing the client for it, why not? It reduces the chances of memory failure, right? Or am I crazy?
    I'd say that's not a good plan. Any card failures I have had have been apparent during testing; if they do well in an initial intensive test, they've been fine. The errors during that testing have not always been apparent when writing the cards. So I think you'd best at least test the cards. But for me, using known reliable cards trumps any benefit of using a new card for every project.

    Leave a comment:

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