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    #31
    Originally posted by grimepoch View Post
    We definitely overshoot, I typically fill a 32G card per day. Mostly though, this was for dealing with my 7D and moire. It would be nice to shoot a little less footage.
    Consider that with the AF100, you'll be able to store about twice as much footage per gigabyte as on the 7D because of the more-efficient codec. So 16GB per day. Unless you're using a lot of 60fps overcranking; in that case the same equivalent amount of shooting footage would require about 24GB.
    ..
    The AU-EVA1 Book - The DVX200 Book - The UX180 & UX90 Book - Lighting For Film & TV - Sound For Film & TV

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      #32
      Originally posted by Barry_Green View Post
      Consider that with the AF100, you'll be able to store about twice as much footage per gigabyte as on the 7D because of the more-efficient codec. So 16GB per day. Unless you're using a lot of 60fps overcranking; in that case the same equivalent amount of shooting footage would require about 24GB.
      That's good to know. I know I will be using overcranking since it is not a resolution hit like it was before.
      formerly know as grimepoch.

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        #33
        I'm getting a headache looking at the SDHC options for my soon-to-be-here AF100. I've concluded that I won't touch the cheaper stuff and will use Sandisk. Brief research shows 10% failure for one brand that people here swear by. Yikes!

        I need to use class 6; clear enough. One vendor has Sandisk Extreme class 6 20MB/s and also Sandisk Extreme III class 6 30MB/s.

        Is there any benefit to purchasing the Extreme III in this application?
        Awarded Best Clear Com Chatter, 2001, PBS Television

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          #34
          I just bought a Lexar Platinum II Class 6 and a PNY Class 10, which would be better? Has anyone had experience with PNY cards?

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            #35
            I decided to keep it all the same. Along with the two 16gb panasonic golds i already have i got 4 more 8gb cards, J&R has them for 25 which is great deal. I also like the idea of 8gb cards, offload quick and footage is spread over many cards than just one. Keeps me more organized and less chance of lost footage. I figure if one 8gb card fails its better than one 32gb with all the days work.

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              #36
              Sandisk 16gb Class 6 at $51 delivered from Buy.com http://www.buy.com/prod/sandisk-16gb...214528585.html Anyone find a lower price?

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                #37
                That is the deal I was looking at when I posted on this thread. But then I get confused. Look at these other two items at the same place.

                http://www.buy.com/prod/sandisk-16gb...218192954.html
                http://www.buy.com/prod/sandisk-extr...215919380.html

                All are 16GB. All are class 6. All are 20MB/s. What's the difference besides price and part number? I searched the Sandisk site and they are no help.

                Why should I consider one over the other?
                Awarded Best Clear Com Chatter, 2001, PBS Television

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                  #38
                  Originally posted by Paul F View Post
                  That is the deal I was looking at when I posted on this thread. But then I get confused. Look at these other two items at the same place.

                  http://www.buy.com/prod/sandisk-16gb...218192954.html
                  http://www.buy.com/prod/sandisk-extr...215919380.html

                  All are 16GB. All are class 6. All are 20MB/s. What's the difference besides price and part number? I searched the Sandisk site and they are no help.

                  Why should I consider one over the other?
                  No difference... the one that is $.44 more is in a retail pack...the other is bulk packed.

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                    #39
                    Ok, it says bulk pack in the description, but I can buy one. Meaning they originally got them as a bulk pack but are now selling them in singles?

                    What about the one that Bob posted? Different part number and it says Extreme III in the title, yet it seems to have the same performance. Different list price.
                    Awarded Best Clear Com Chatter, 2001, PBS Television

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                      #40
                      Originally posted by grimrebes View Post
                      Coming from an exclusive P2 workflow and stepping into this SDHC environment where cards are extremely prone to fragmentation, I can't imagine reusing cards. Granted, the least expensive ones are a little more pricey than, say, DV tapes, but in the grand scheme of things, not by much. And I never reused tapes, so why reuse cards that can run about the came cost as DVCProHD tapes?

                      Have people experienced problems writing to fresh, out of box sd cards from any reputable suppliers? Or does the reliability of the media become an issue only when reusing cards?
                      This interests me as well, especially if using a top-quality Transcend, which costs just under $2 per GB. Of course, that's many times more than a hard drive, which is around 10 cents per GB. But as an archive, isn't a SD card much more reliable long-term than hard drives or DVD/Blu-ray discs, especially since they can easily be stored in a safe deposit box? I know it does seem a bit extravagant and wasteful, but safely archiving my EX1 footage was such a pain.
                      robcollins.net

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                        #41
                        Originally posted by robcollins View Post
                        This interests me as well, especially if using a top-quality Transcend, which costs just under $2 per GB. Of course, that's many times more than a hard drive, which is around 10 cents per GB. But as an archive, isn't a SD card much more reliable long-term than hard drives or DVD/Blu-ray discs, especially since they can easily be stored in a safe deposit box? I know it does seem a bit extravagant and wasteful, but safely archiving my EX1 footage was such a pain.
                        I would be nice to find out how long they last on the shelf. It would be easy to budget into every project too.

                        My father, who in his retirement got back into photography, uses SD cards like rolls of film. Considering how many photos you can take even on a modest 4GB card, and how inexpensive they are, he doesn't re-use them.
                        There is no intuitive interface, not even the nipple. It's all learned. -Bruce Ediger

                        SLR'd WRDS

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                          #42
                          The lifespan is typically rated at 5 to 10 years, although some manufacturers claim 100 years. Personally, I'd back up to a raid system to keep data forever and move it to newer smaller methods as they become available. It's not the cheapest but still the safest. Multiple copies is THE best way to go so if one dies, you can replace it from the other.

                          I'd also not want to gamble on cheaper cards that I was using right out of the box. I use Transcend and Kingston, but I very heavily test them first before a shoot. I want to MAKE SURE they are running strong and error free before using in the field. I wouldn't want to be switching to new cards every shoot and not know any history of the card.
                          formerly know as grimepoch.

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                            #43
                            I ended up ordering Sandisk 16gb class 6 through Straighttrading.net on Amazon - $53.30ea Didn't realize Buy.com tacks on tax and shipping for a total of $63ea.

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                              #44
                              Originally posted by grimepoch View Post
                              The lifespan is typically rated at 5 to 10 years, although some manufacturers claim 100 years. Personally, I'd back up to a raid system to keep data forever and move it to newer smaller methods as they become available. It's not the cheapest but still the safest. Multiple copies is THE best way to go so if one dies, you can replace it from the other.

                              I'd also not want to gamble on cheaper cards that I was using right out of the box. I use Transcend and Kingston, but I very heavily test them first before a shoot. I want to MAKE SURE they are running strong and error free before using in the field. I wouldn't want to be switching to new cards every shoot and not know any history of the card.
                              Good points. As to the 5-10 year lifespan, I'm guessing that refers to cards that are reused. If one's shelved after very limited use, what could corrupt or wear out the card if safely stored?
                              robcollins.net

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                                #45
                                Because internally, NAND gates are used to store data in the SD cards (they are flash memory). Over time, the potential that is stored internally can leak out through a process called tunneling. Tunneling (also known as leakage) occurs in all CMOS electronics. It's the reason they draw power even when they are doing nothing (and with newer technology, leakage power gets worse and worse because gate oxide thicknesses keep shrinking).
                                formerly know as grimepoch.

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