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Is AVCCAM of AF100 4:2:2?

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    Is AVCCAM of AF100 4:2:2?

    1.:
    Is AVCCAM of AF100 4:2:2?


    2.:
    Is the data rate high enough to be acceptable as professional standard?
    Will the material be accepted by e.g. BBC?

    #2
    It will probably be accepted by the BBC in some uses, though who knows if it will make the grade for their list of qualified cameras for HD shows? I'm sure the techies will put it through it's paces once it becomes available.
    Adrian

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      #3
      Is the colorspace 4:2:2 ?????

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        #4
        Originally posted by daktulus View Post
        Is the colorspace 4:2:2 ?????

        No.

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          #5
          No the AVC recording to cards is 8 bit 4:2:0.

          Does output 4:2:2 live via the HDSDI port for external recorders, but still only 8 bit.

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            #6
            AFAIK, the BBC has not issued any statement regarding AVCHD compression, one way or the other.

            They did say that 35mbps of MPEG-2 is not enough, so EX1/EX3/PMW350 users have been using the Nano to get around that restriction. As Razz16mm says, you could use that same nano on the AF100 and get high-bitrate 4:2:2 recording.
            ..
            The AU-EVA1 Book - The DVX200 Book - The UX180 & UX90 Book - Lighting For Film & TV - Sound For Film & TV

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              #7
              AVCHD is defined to be 4:2:0, with a maximum bit rate of 24Mbps. It can be somewhat less, but right now it can not be more. This is good enough for blu-ray; AVCHD is one of the codices in the blu-ray spec.

              [EDIT] OK, technically it's not. AVC is. I believe that AVCHD is derived from AVC, but I'm not going to research it any further due to lack of time. [/EDIT]

              And it exceeds much of broadcast TV in the USA.

              But it doesn't give you any headroom for post processing. People typically want more color information and higher bit rates so they can do the normal grading, color correction, rotoscoping, contrast changes, etc. without inducing artifacts in the final product.

              This is why the BBC (and many other organizations) want at least 4:2:2 and 50Mbps -- so they can do a quality job of post processing before transcoding down into something more compact for delivery - either broadcasting or encoding on a disc (if blu-ray you're right back to AVCHD of course).
              Last edited by Bruce Watson; 09-14-2010, 10:45 AM.

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