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    #16
    Originally posted by GMC View Post
    Nitsui, the photograph is very nice. Actually you could already get HDR - films out of the GH1: if you do photo timelapses with the "bracket" feature. I think I'll give it a try in the next days.

    I think HDR from a camera manufacturers perspective shouldn't be too difficult - you already have the capability to shoot 60 frames per second in the GH1, and an easy step would be to change the exposure time for every second frame, and then mangle the 2 frames together again - this would give 30fps with HDR.

    Thats what I love about this forum - it is always very inspiring!
    Thanks for comment about photo!

    Here is the problem with the first approach you explained. The timelapse HDR has been done with success however only with wide shots of scenery. However it doesn't work well when there are any sort of moving objects. The HDR is a layer of photos that combine their dynamic ranges. If there is any movement in the photos you get a lot of blur and a lot of times I have found a lot of artifacts that are tough or impossible to remove. That is just with one frame so you could imagine a minute worth of video.

    The problem with the second approach about the 60fps would still leave a blur effect by changing the exposure time you would capture blur with anything moving. Then you would be back to the same problem as above. I think it would have to be a completely different idea of how sensors work. Basically a sensor so sensitive that it is able to capture the low dark areas without blur. And a camera capable of just keeping the shadow detail on that particular plate then getting rid of everything else and replacing it with detail of the highlights on another plate. Basically a sensor that can have simultaneously 2 or more different dynamic ranges. That's why I think it would need to be a 3 layered sensor that is able to capture different ranges on each layer.
    www.burningcrowpictures.com

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      #17
      I think the beam splitter idea needs to be tried to see if it is on the right track. I was going to try it a while ago but like I said I didn't have the equipment to even attempt it. I still just have one GH1 so I wouldn't be somebody able to try. If there was a way to get a 3rd camera in there I think it would be perfect. And just imagine that idea in miniature on a circuit inside a future camera.
      www.burningcrowpictures.com

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        #18
        Panavision is working on a 6-stop HDR camera. HDR is achieved by using 6 different photosites (each exposed differently) for each final pixel.

        It's called DynaMax. Here's an article that mentions it:http://magazine.creativecow.net/arti...ture-of-pixels

        Scroll down to about halfway.

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          #19
          Originally posted by Jester2138 View Post
          Panavision is working on a 6-stop HDR camera. HDR is achieved by using 6 different photosites (each exposed differently) for each final pixel.

          It's called DynaMax. Here's an article that mentions it:http://magazine.creativecow.net/arti...ture-of-pixels

          Scroll down to about halfway.
          Of course! That is even easier than a layered sensor! Thanks for the link dood.
          www.burningcrowpictures.com

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            #20
            No problem If only I had access to Panavision cameras... Ahh dreams...

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              #21
              Originally posted by Nitsuj View Post
              I've been in pursuit of the HDR video solution for a while. I thought a splitter solution myself however it would limit to highs and lows leaving out the mids with a two camera system. What I think would be the solution would be a three layered sensor. Of course this hasn't been invented yet
              ..... They' re selling cameras with three RGB sensor for years. Instead of three RGB narrow band filters, get 3 CMOS chips with a kit of NDs or a combo of splitters with different ratios, a chip programmed to combine and tone map the output and you get instant HDR with 20+++ stops dynamic range. Could even add a menu item with options: +3 stops, + 5 stops.... sky's the limit, until your images look a little bit strange (too pictorial, too like a painting...)
              ____
              'We all have wings, but some of us don't know why" INXS

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                #22
                Mentioning Panavision: Fuji was using for years, a similar approach: two sets of pixels, one 'normal' and another set 'smaller' - only for the highlights - resulting in about 2 stops increase in the dynamic range. All controlled from a menu in the camera.
                ____
                'We all have wings, but some of us don't know why" INXS

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                  #23
                  I've seen demonstrated at one of the ACS meetings, a 3D rig with two SI1920 cameras. Instead of offsetting the cameras for the 3D effect, one could replace the 50/50 beamsplitter with a 70/30 or 80/20 t/r ratio, line up the cameras and get a pretty good dual stream recording.
                  The rig was quite big, not necessarily friendly for handheld, shaky cam stuff, but not much larger than a fully kitted F9xx camera.

                  Here are some 3D rigs using large cameras:

                  http://fullres.blogspot.com/2009_04_01_archive.html
                  ____
                  'We all have wings, but some of us don't know why" INXS

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                    #24
                    Nice link!
                    www.burningcrowpictures.com

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