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Canon R6—Anyone buying one for B-Cam/Gimbal?

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    #31
    Thanks. To be honest, I only use the Kelvin on my GH5, so not an issue for the most part.

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      #32
      If you use RF lenses with a control ring, you can set WB to it and twist it to quickly change Kelvin. It's quite useful.

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        #33
        That is a nice feature.

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          #34
          It's worth mentioning there's also a Canon adapter with a ring so you can use EF lenses as well.

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            #35
            Have not taken to RF lenses at all. I've rented a few for the R6, and I bought the new RF nifty-fifty. Inexplicably, there does not seem to be a way to instantaneously pause the DPAF and tweak focus manually. You literally have to dig into a menu to switch it to MF. I don't think you can map that function to a button either.

            The R6, for me, has evolved into a camera I keep over my shoulder at al times with a fast, light prime. I can instantly start taking beautiful, floaty, handheld b-roll. Never thought I'd be able to walk around with an EF 50mm 1.4 handheld, and get not just usable, but very nice footage.

            R6 is a dream for vintage lenses too. If I don't need AF, the nFD 50mm 1.4 is super tiny, and captures beautiful images. When I don't mind a touch extra weight, the FD 55mm 1.2 SSC is sheer poetry.

            The DPAF seems very bi-polar to me. Works perfectly in some situations (talking head interview). But in more complicated shots with more people, I have trouble taming to reliably do what I want it to. Some people keep praising the AF, so not sure what's going on.

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              #36
              When I was using the EOS R, I really preferred the ef lenses. The RF lenses were nice in that they had incremental control of the iris, but the ef to rf adapters were really useful. For outside shots, I would use the ND adapter. For inside shots, I would use the control ring adapter with the control ring set to ISO so that I could ride the ISO. It would take a lot for me to want to lose the ability to have the variable ND in order to use RF lenses.

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                #37
                I also always ride the ISO, but just FYI we are losing dynamic range when we do that, and may or may not be introducing artifacts (Canon's own caution).

                Canon recommends sticking with ISO 400 when shooting C-Log on the DSLRs/mirrorless' (not sure about any updated memo on C-Log3).

                Not very practical and I doubt we'd notice a tremendous hit in DR (especially indoors), but just FYI.

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                  #38
                  The base iso for clog-3 is 800 ISO on the R6. I would love to know whether the DR is dependent on the ISO or if it stays constant like the cinema cameras. I would also love to know if it matches the cinema cameras at all. Right now, Canon is doing a fairly decent job of making sure their cinema cameras have similar color profiles, but I have no idea if their photo cameras are matched at all.

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                    #39
                    Using a lower or higher than native ISO has always affected DR in most cameras (even a little), but by how much is very questionable.

                    Canon mentions in their manual using lower than 400 for C-Log and 800 for C-Log3 affects DR ("narrower"), but doesn't say anything about using higher.

                    For the 5D Mark IV, they mention using higher than 400 can lead to artifacts. Color shifts are also common in many cameras, some even 5x the price.
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                      #40
                      On the R6 (and presumably others) you can see the right of the histogram get crunched more and more to the left as you lower ISO below 400 while in C-log. You can also see it on the waveform scopes of the cinema line (the top getting chainsawed off below ISO 800 or 850).

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                        #41
                        Originally posted by drummondb View Post
                        On the R6 (and presumably others) you can see the right of the histogram get crunched more and more to the left as you lower ISO below 400 while in C-log. You can also see it on the waveform scopes of the cinema line (the top getting chainsawed off below ISO 800 or 850).
                        I think this happens on all cameras. As you go below base ISO, your dynamic range is increasingly allocated to the shadows. So, your exposure will come down but your highlights will still be blown out. If my highlights on my Sony cameras are blowing out at base ISO, then lowering the ISO will not bring them back.
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                          #42
                          Originally posted by cpreston View Post
                          The base iso for clog-3 is 800 ISO on the R6. I would love to know whether the DR is dependent on the ISO or if it stays constant like the cinema cameras.
                          You should be able to test this by checking out clip points. ON the C200 when you drop below ISO 800 you ae clamping the DR (in raw) It wont fill the histogram WFM any more. - like clips at 90 rtc.

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                            #43
                            Originally posted by drummondb View Post
                            Have not taken to RF lenses at all. I've rented a few for the R6, and I bought the new RF nifty-fifty. Inexplicably, there does not seem to be a way to instantaneously pause the DPAF and tweak focus manually.
                            I have focus acive/inactive (cant think of the stupid term) mappedd to the rear wheel centre button.

                            Maybe that just does 'focus lock' not actual manual focus though - I cant remember.

                            There are elements of this camera that are beyond clueless.

                            http://www.sammorganmoore.com View my feature Film

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                              #44
                              Just found another annoying quirk of the R6: if externally recording in HD, you are locked into a 60p signal, no matter the frame rate of the camera. And the signal doesn't allow pulldown to 24p or 30p. At least that's how it works on the Ninja V. If you're recording in 4K, the frame-rates work fine externally.

                              Can anyone confirm? Why does Canon do dumb sh*t like this?

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                                #45
                                Are you sure you're not in the HFR mode by any chance?

                                Also maybe check the HDMI output menu settings?

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