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a doc on kubrick

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    #16
    Yes I remember seeing that clip in some doc on Kubrick. Good stuff. I remember Sydney Pollack saying in some doc "Lots of people in my business claim to be perfectionists. Trust me. There was only one. Stanley." ha.

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      #17
      Originally posted by kevin baggott View Post
      Yes I remember seeing that clip in some doc on Kubrick. Good stuff. I remember Sydney Pollack saying in some doc "Lots of people in my business claim to be perfectionists. Trust me. There was only one. Stanley." ha.
      That may be so, but that doesn't mean that he was actually good at everything. IMO he was not the best director of actors. And I feel like his weaknesses were a consequence of his strengths in that his highly analytical mind was also not terribly emotional. Some may disagree with me. But take Barry Lyndon, for example, which I consider to be a near-perfect film. IMO all that holds it back is the performance of the lead, which lacks nuance, depth, and development. I think Ryan O'Neal has turned in some fine performances, and I suspect that the blame for his shortcomings in that role falls on Kubrick. Kubrick is my favorite director, but that's my opinion.
      www.VideoAbe.com

      "In this world, Elwood, you must be oh so smart or oh so pleasant. Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant." -Harvey

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        #18
        Originally posted by ahalpert View Post

        Continental breakfast and the nervous mob boss (surprise bday party)? Both brilliantly done
        Yes, the triumphantly weird Continental Breakfast. The gangster one I had in mind was this one. We mashed up the camera moves of Goodfellas with the lighting style of Casino. It took a bunch of takes to get the dolly in/zoom in right (at :13) but the director and I knew at the same time when we hit it.

        Charles Papert
        charlespapert.com

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          #19
          ya guys nailed the lighting and camera moves for sure - pretty funny.

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            #20
            "IMO he was not the best director of actors" I quoted in another post Kurosawa saying at 76 he was only now figuring out how to make a film. And I really don't think it was hyperbole. Bergman said in an interview "I don't know what the hell I'm doing. I really don't. It's all so mysterious." Ford saying famously, 'the best things in films are accidents.' etc. Really - what director did it all? And I think Kubrick knew a thing or two about acting. Nicholson said Kubrick was not interested in naturalism. Kubrick wanted it heightened. Lots of actors who worked with him said great things about him. Sure others not. Duvall even said she'd even work with him again in a heartbeat. There are great performances in all of his films. I personally think Ryan O'Neil is pretty damn good in Barry. Kubrick's family all talked about how emotional he was. Anyway. Just my 2 cents.

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              #21
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnge8MJeGB4 - if you go to 1:05 the interviewer asks her about Kubrick doing so many takes. I guess it was Kubrick's way of getting what he wanted. I don't know how frankly a film director would rehearse with actors in a traditional sense without knowing their (actors) language. If you don't have that background - you probably have a good bull**** detector and figure out how to get there one way or another. Scorsese apparently says very little to actors . He says he never took acting classes. But then again - he can tell someone like Paul Newman "Try not to be funny," when Newman was having a hard time with a scene.

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                #22

                Just saw this -
                Nicole Kidman said of her experience on "Eyes Wide Shut" that Kubrick would shoot her page-long monologue over and over, and just when she found herself mentally and emotionally exhausted, they would continue shooting, and that was when she began surprising herself and her director.

                Kubrick wasn't very hands-on in terms of directing his actors, but he had a tendency for shooting many takes, as a means of getting his cast beyond their most obvious choices and discovering more dissonant and interesting ways to portray any given scene.

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