Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. Collapse Details
    #11
    Default
    My current Lilliput 664/O/P has false color, but the scale is only on screen for a fraction of a second, and it doesn't display corresponding IRE levels, so I just use zebras.

    An incident light meter makes sense when you have the time, but modern camera's built-in reflective spot meter make stand alone spot meters less relevant.


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    West of the Pecos
    Posts
    2,649
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Imamacuser View Post
    My current Lilliput 664/O/P has false color, but the scale is only on screen for a fraction of a second, and it doesn't display corresponding IRE levels, ...
    How is it possible that someone goes through all the trouble of developing a false color feature, yet has no clue as to how it should work? Geez, spend an hour with any DP, camera operator, first AC, would get them the information they need. Or is this some sort of plot to make camera crew prematurely grey or to send me to an early grave?
    Awarded Best Clear Com Chatter, 2001, PBS Television


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #13
    Default
    It can be used to gauge if blue/green screen is lit evenly, but that's about the only use I can think of.


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #14
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by CharlesPapert View Post
    I wouldn't know what to do with those thumbnail versions of waveforms on onboard monitors other than laugh at them.
    Personally I like to squint myopically and debate punching it up to full size, before punching it up to full size.

    What really annoys me is when they're not full frame rate, but try to fudge it by doing some sort of awful interpolation. Unacceptable!

    What further annoys me is that few if any of them have a steerable region-of-interest box which superimposes over the waveform itself, so you can tell exactly what level someone's phiz is indicating. Has anyone ever seen anything like that?


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #15
    Senior Member JPNola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    New Orleans USA
    Posts
    1,628
    Default
    Maybe scopes less matter to me because I never had them in the field for the first 30 years of my career. They were something video engineers and maybe editors used, but not DP’s. They were expensive, heavy devices the size of a shoebox and you didn’t have them on location unless it was a truck-shoot.

    A local cameraman I know just goes by eye alone, looking at the image in the VF, the VF roughly calibrated using color bars. No zebra, even. And he keeps getting jobs so his rudimentary method must be working out.

    The spot-meter feature of the Odyssey was brilliant. Has any other monitor maker incorporated a spot-meter feature like that?
    Big sources matter.


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #16
    Director of Photography
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    1,860
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by JPNola View Post
    Maybe scopes less matter to me because I never had them in the field for the first 30 years of my career. They were something video engineers and maybe editors used, but not DPís. They were expensive, heavy devices the size of a shoebox and you didnít have them on location unless it was a truck-shoot.
    We used to cart them around to field shoots all the time. This pic is from '93 (I'm in white shirt).
    BBBbts.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by JPNola View Post
    A local cameraman I know just goes by eye alone, looking at the image in the VF, the VF roughly calibrated using color bars. No zebra, even. And he keeps getting jobs so his rudimentary method must be working out.
    Put a gun to my head, I can light a set to eye--at 800 ISO anyway, much higher than that I get fooled by the ratios. Viewfinders have enough subtlety these days to be able to rely on them, as long as you know the particulars of how it renders values which just becomes a "mental LUT". I do most of my fine tuning to the monitor (Sony A250, calibrated and light protected) but I use each of the scopes for specific things and it would be frustrating for me not to have them in those instances. If I have to go super portable I'll deal with the little silly ones on an onboard monitor but mostly rely on eye and the image at that point.
    Charles Papert
    charlespapert.com


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #17
    Senior Member JPNola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    New Orleans USA
    Posts
    1,628
    Default
    I more meant typical productions, Charles. Not productions with a large crew and budget for such things. The two-person crews that by far comprised, and comprise, most shoots.

    For the first 25-30 years of my career I never saw a scope-box in the field other than on remote-trucks.
    Big sources matter.


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    10,466
    Default
    I find even the smallest wfm useful - open the iris- observe a flattening on the top line. Close the iris until there is no flat top. Shoot.


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #19
    Senior Member JPNola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    New Orleans USA
    Posts
    1,628
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by morgan_moore View Post
    I find even the smallest wfm useful - open the iris- observe a flattening on the top line. Close the iris until there is no flat top. Shoot.
    I ask because of my lack of knowledge...

    Doesnít that method ignore the exposure on your subject? Sure, you backed down to where the windows behind the subject are not clipping. But that might leave your subject 4 stops under.

    Doesnít one have to expose for the subject and not just for the overall image?
    Big sources matter.


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    10,466
    Default
    I over simplified. Of course if you have for example some windows or spotlights in the scene you may choose to leave them “popping out” ( or clipping) to normalise the base exposure


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •