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    1 Man 1 Red & A followfocus
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    recently discovering that Red has no auto features. disconcerting at first (or is auto?) left me with a mixed feeling of inspiration that said think old school and learn to be a man.

    i need to know if 1 man & 1 Red with a (sigma 15-30) follow focus can do it?
    maybe i need some sought of cradle strap (crazy?) to hold on to the cam while making adjustments as i will be holding from the top handle to shoot at waist level leaving only the other hand for everything else(?)

    i want to use the Red (unambitiously) as a tourist would with a camcorder (mostly at hyperfocal settings) on the streets and in the city sampling shots that can later be montaged in post.

    but i don't want to be too present.

    i like the 3rd picture from the top http://www.dvxuser.com/V6/showthread.php?t=81874 if i can get by without adding too much to what i can see there (other than lens, lcd, battery, flash) im hoping it wont overclutter.

    i dont want to come across like a spoiled kid with lots of money. cause i'm not.
    my friend purchased a $50.000 car. i choose Red. its much more experimental.

    can i do it by myself without looking too out of place?

    btw. any news about Redcode RGB 2K Scaled will support white balance control and will the Red manual documentation be available to everyone as a download?

    best regards


     

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    #2
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    I suppose anything is possible, but it seems like you might have trouble looking like a tourist with a Red strapped on you. Just out of curiosity, how critical is resolution for you? I'm guessing it must be if you are looking at Red. Otherwise, would a camera like the HVX suit you needs where you can blend in with the crowd, have some auto features, etc.

    But hey, the beauty of this camera seems to be its modularity, so maybe you will be able to configure it in a way that works for you. Tell us more about the kind of work you do. Is this just for personal use or do you do you distribute your work? That might help with figuring out whether Red is the right camera.

    Steve


     

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    #3
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    Mr. Sleep,

    As far as focusing yourself while shooting. It can be done but following focus yourself takes a lot of practice and I would not want to do it off of the LCD screen so I would say the EVF is a must. If you hope to blend into the background and not be noticed while shooting I would not recomend a RED. A HVX or DVX would be much better for your application I would think and a lot more user friendly if it is going to be your first camera. Build up your skills as a shooter with a panasonic and then look at the RED.


     

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    #4
    Ban Me Please! insanityfw's Avatar
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    "i see RED people"...that's funny.

    Like it's been said...for what you're talking about RED may be a bit of overkill, but then only you can make that determination.

    I don't know what lenses were used in the 1960's and 70's when ENG cameras where 16mm film units. Seems like there would be one person, with a camera and a zoom lense out doing there own shooting.

    Maybe focus issues will become part of your experimentation. You definitely will draw attention, that part is certain.

    For what it's worth most of what I want to do can be done with the HVX, but I simply want the RED and I make no appologies for that...neither should you.

    Good luck,

    Jason
    I know how to do it. You just wouldn't know it from the way that I do it.


     

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    #5
    Unscripted Mod Erik Olson's Avatar
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    Finner said a good half of it - though I'll go a step further. I'm of the mind that the urge to upgrade to RED might represent a precipitous decision for many users where standard HD (720 / 1080p) might be more than enough for almost every situation.

    I'll illustrate my position on this. Say you're someone who has a need to commute to work everyday and suddenly you feel the urge, for no good reason really, to trade your sensible Jetta in for a Bentley CGT. The Jetta was nice, because unlike most cars available in America, it ran on diesel, and you worried very little about parking it downtown.

    What have you got now? Well, now you have a car that really and admittedly in all honesty, requires two or more operating positions, a possible third to manage your data, while all you really needed it to do was get you nineteen miles down the road to your office.

    Let's say you don't just commute to a mid-management job in San Mateo. Let's say that you each and every day are required to entertain important clients who demand only the best out of those who provide services to them - people like the folks who run the Tab division at Coca-Cola, or the guy who flies his own balloons around the planet - now, in that situation, when they're used to driving around in a Vantage or Fiorano, you might well need RED... er, I mean the Continental.

    I think it makes sense to say that if you're already straddling that line where your clients demand HD to the 80th percentile or 35mm film production, RED is the most logical leap into what is certain to be the future of commercial and feature production.

    If you aren't paid to produce with it - "unambitiously" shooting on the DL - then RED is absolutely wrong for you. In features and in lack of features. Without a crew to support you, or investing huge amounts of time to get solo images that are technically viable, you'll largely bring back footage which is useless to you or anyone else.

    Let Jarred and and Jim tell you what really went into Milk Girls. They'll tell you. It's not a joke, it was a major deployment, just as you would see on a feature set. Five guys minimum - maybe twelve or more.

    Anyway, you sound to me to be someone who has no need for this camera.

    I'm here to crush your spirit for your own benefit. Sorry.

    e
    Erik Olson



     

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    #6
    Red Savant Gibby's Avatar
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    MrSleep,

    Experienced shooters, especially those shooting EFP-style, will easily be able to shoot alone with RED One, particularly when shooting deeper depth of field in 1080p and 720p, which would be most applicable to the type of shooting you describe. That said, you don't sound like a particularly experienced shooter, so for the type of shooting you describe, perhaps RED One isn't the best choice for you. A simple camcorder rig would probably better suit your needs.
    Last edited by Gibby; 12-23-2006 at 09:21 AM.
    Steve Gibby
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    #7
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    Nice Analogy's Erik

    I think part of the problems some may run in to with owning a RED is the perception that "if I own the best camera I can get my hands on my footage will be better". I would say this kind of statement would only be true for an experienced shooter or experienced film production camera 1st, OP or DOP. Lets face it if you are trying to get your pilots license you do not get it with flight time in a Jumbo Jet.

    Now some people with little or no shooting experience may jump all over me for making these statements. If that is the case I would pretty much see it as proof that you are not ready for a camera that is the level of a RED.

    In the end everyone can do what they want with their own $$$. I just feel if you are relatively new to cameras a DVX or HVX would be a much better choice.


     

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    #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finner
    Nice Analogy's Erik

    Now some people with little or no shooting experience may jump all over me for making these statements. If that is the case I would pretty much see it as proof that you are not ready for a camera that is the level of a RED.

    .
    Hi,

    As somebody posted on CML,

    "If you know how to light it does not matter what you shoot with, if you don't know how to light, it does not matter what you shoot with"

    Stephen


     

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    #9
    Senior Member Muttondraw's Avatar
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    I don't see any reason why you can't operate this by yourself. The biggest potential issue might be holding focus if you were trying to use a small DOF with a long fast lens, but you would be using a wide slow lens with presumably lots of light and you have said that your intention is to be shooting mostly at hyperfocal settings (I presume by that you mean you will set to focus at the hyperfocal distance so you don't have to follow focus at all). So once you have set the camera the most you are likely to have to do it ride the iris a bit. Even if you do end up having to follow focus sometimes it can be quite manageable, just requires a bit of practice.

    You will be conspicuous, there is no way people will fail to notice you, so if that is an issue you may have a problem. Even with your Sigma the camera will be far far bigger than any domestic camcorder and it won't look anything like a domestic camcorder, people will assume you are a pro.

    Shooting from a top handle can become tiring after a while, it is tricky to reach the lens so you end up a bit hunched over. If you plan to do a lot of this and you can manage with a slightly higher viewpoint consider tucking the camera under your arm and supporting it from underneath. It is easier to support the camera in this way and the lens isn't so far away.

    There are other things to consider too like how you get audio into the camera. There has been no definite announcement from Red yet, but it appears there may well not be any mic preamps built into the camera, so if you want to use an on-camera mic you will also need to have a separate mic preamp. You will have to mount this on the camera somewhere.

    The RedOne is designed as a digital cinematography camera but with enough flexibility to allow it to be used outside of its most obvious comfort zone. It isn't designed as an ENG camera for easy one man operation. I suspect using RedOne in a one man setup is going to require some compromise and some adaptation of style, but it is totally do-able. There are a number of people posting here who intend to use it in this way (me included). So if you are up for a bit of a challenge and weigh up the benefits RedOne brings as being worthy of a bit of pain.... No problem. It all depends where you ae coming from.

    Martin


     

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    #10
    Senior Member joe 1008's Avatar
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    Mr. Sleep:

    It is supposed that the RED will have a great dynamic range and a superb low light performance. That are important points in many situations. I also think the RED will draw less attention than any big 2/3" camcorder. Especially without mattebox and cage. And think about in how many situations you really need to pull focus. 80% or 90% of your shots will do fine focussing once before shooting.


     

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