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    Re: Getting the right image ?
    #61
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    By the way, if you want to know more about shutter speed, then you should read the "Shutter Speed Tutorial..." In the technical section of DVXuser.com.

    Andy


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    Re: Getting the right image ?
    #62
    Peter_Gaudry
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    I would like to ask a related question, which I don't believe has been fully addressed yet (please feel free to correct me if I'm mistaken).

    How does one avoid getting an image that is too 'soft' ? In a grabs thread rich lee made the comment that an image was too soft: http://www.dvxuser.com/cgi-bin/DVX2/...num=1099281329

    I've found that when importing my footage into my NLE, it looks too soft. is this because I have the shutter speed too low, and as a result I'm getting blurring or softness?

    It seems to occur even when I'm very still also, so I'm not sure what exactly I'm doing wrong. But after Rich mentioned it I knew I had to resolve what is evidently a common newbie error when shooting.


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    Re: Getting the right image ?
    #63
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    Is it soft on the TV? Or just in the editor? Because the editor may be displaying just one field, which would make it look very soft indeed.

    If it's soft on the TV as well, take a look at your DETAIL setting. You can get an incredible range of sharpness, from downright blurry to (ouch -- that hurt) sharp. But the sharpness comes from edge enhancement, so it's best to not crank the detail level up too high if you want natural-looking video.


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    Re: Getting the right image ?
    #64
    Peter_Gaudry
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    Thanks very much for the speedy answer - it is on a Computer LCD that it looks soft. I know it's heresy to not have a tv monitor, but I can't afford one right now.

    I'll give the detail a shot.


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    Re: Getting the right image ?
    #65
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    Andy -- what else can be said, except, superb answers. I have a question about setting WB. I wondered about the difference between white and 18% cards, since most everything I've read up to now said to use 18% card to set WB. So I bought an Expodisc to set WB on my digital camera but, I've used it to set WB on a DVX100 too.

    What's your take on using an Expodisc to set WB on the DVX100. I ask because the Expodisc takes incoming light and turns into 18% and not white. The colors seem to be quite good and nuetral when I use it. The only problem is you need a fair amount of light or it wont register. Thanks.

    Steve


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    Re: Getting the right image ?
    #66
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    Gray cards can be used for white balance. You can even buy "warm cards" that have a slightly bluish tint to cause the resulting color temperature to be warmer. Most gray cards today are manufactured to exacting standards of neutrality.

    Under average lighting conditions there is no difference between setting the white balance with the gray card or the white card. The difference shows up in extremely bright light or extremely dim light.

    The benefit of setting white balance using a gray card instead of a white card is that in very bright light, especially if you haven't set the exposure first (ND filter and iris), it is possible to overexpose some colors of light in the mix and not others, resulting in an incorrect white balance. In other words, some colors might be so blown out that they wouldn't register properly relative to the colors that are less bright. And setting white balance with a gray card should prevent this problem because it reduces the intensity of all colors evenly.

    The benefit of setting white balance with a white card instead of a gray card is that in very dim light, as you mentioned, you can still get a reading. Whereas the gray card might not reflect enough light to get an accurate white balance. Some colors may fall below detection when their intensity is reduced by the gray, resulting in an incorrect white balance.

    I haven't had the opportunity to use an ExpoDisc. The ExpoDisc is a prismatic filter that gathers light from 180 degrees in front of the camera and has a translucent white back. It provides an even colorcast of all available light. Under most conditions, this average is close to 18% gray. The obvious benefit of the ExpoDisc is that you don't have to carry a gray card around and don't have to position the gray card. You just set the white balance through the ExpoDisc and then take the filter off to shoot.

    I am wondering how the ExpoDisc performs in very bright light, very dim light, and under situations of uneven lighting. And does it come in a 72mm size?


    Andy


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    Re: Getting the right image ?
    #67
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    Andy,

    The Expodisc does come in 72mm. Although I bought it to use with my digital camera, I bought the 72mm so that it would fit the filter size of the DVX100 exactly. The only drawback in using the Expodisc with the DVX100 is that you must take off the lens hood to put on the Expodisc. At a recent wedding I used the A setting to set the indoor WB and B for outside. Which brings me to your next question.

    The Expodisc seems to work like a charm as long as there is enough light for the camera to register the setting. So, outside Ive not had any trouble setting WB with the Expodisc, but indoor is another problem. A lot of weddings take place in churches and the lighting conditions inside are usually quite dismal, to say the least. At the last wedding we had three DVX100s and all had WB set using the Expodisc. The two main cameras had to be pointed at the main lighting in order to set WB.

    The Expodisc cuts the amount of light entering in so that it becomes an expedition in finding a spot within a darkly lit room in which to set WB. If it becomes that much of a problem, though, using one of the presets or a white or gray card may be the only choice.

    Steve


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    Re: Getting the right image ?
    #68
    Junior Member cortiz001's Avatar
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    Just a thought, I looked at the expodisc a while back for my digital camera (this was before I got my dvx100a) and looking around in other sites someone had metioned to use two coffee filters like you would the expodisc. I must say it works very well for both video and photography. Perfect white bal. everytime with two coffee filters over the lens and the lens hood doesnt have to come off.

    Charlie


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    Re: Getting the right image ?
    #69
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    Actually the DVX100P has a few less options as compared to the DVX100A. When in 24P and 60I, the Focus cannot be set to Auto. You do not have any gain controls. So it is a little simpler to use yet more frustrating.



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    Re: Getting the right image ?
    #70
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    "For example, halogen work lights that are sold at hardware and home supply stores are very bright, but also poorly balanced for video. The red in them is much stronger than the other colors. To the eye, the colors will look good and the light will look bright. But to the camera, the brightness of the single strong red color will defeat the ability of the camera to properly detect other colors. The other colors will be too weak to dim to be picked up when the exposure is set for the bright colors of light. Under halogen work lights, people usually turn orange or red on video. "

    why did the guy at my pro video lighting store tell me i could just as well use the work lights as lowell pros?


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