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    #11
    Senior Member cecil995's Avatar
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    That advice is pretty much right on. The only thing we do differently is have the main camera operator have a handheld cam as well, to get the procession, as well as cutaway shots of the crowd and other elements during long homilies or speakers.

    The only other thing that I would add to that is to make sure that you have lights with you for the reception. Small camera mounted ones work well. Just make sure that you don't blast people out with them, give yourself some good distance between you are your subject. I usually warn the bride and groom beforehand so there are no suprises.

    There was a big debate about starting a wedding/event section on this site with a great number of members voting for it, so I don't know why it has not happened yet
    You're so money and you don't even know it!

    Dan Lewin, Videographer/Editor

    www.lewinmedia.com


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    #12
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    How would you shoot if you only had one camera or had a camera fail during a shoot?


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    #13
    Senior Member cecil995's Avatar
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    If i only had one camera i would shoot in the back up the isle, that would be the only place you could cover everything and get things framed right.
    You're so money and you don't even know it!

    Dan Lewin, Videographer/Editor

    www.lewinmedia.com


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    #14
    Senior Member BillP's Avatar
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    When I first got into video, I told myself I would never do weddings or porn.

    I've done several weddings. ;-0



    -Bill


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    #15
    Senior Member RokMartian's Avatar
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    I've done only a few weddings and the one suggestion that I would make is to try to attend the rehearsal. (usually the night before the ceremony) I usually don't plan on recording anything, but I bring a camera for hand held use, just in case.

    Attending the rehearsal will make you more prepared, since you will now know in advance how the ceremony will take place and you can figure out the best camera placement. Usually the "sound guy" will be there and you will get an opportunity to discuss patching into the system directly for audio.

    If appropriate, try to talk with the officiant of the wedding and if they have done weddings there before, ask them where other videographers have placed cameras. They may come up with some areas you never thought of. (I have heard of this back-firing - the officiant may tell you where NOT to place a camera)

    If there is wedding planner there running the show, they most likely will have a schedule for the day.

    One issue that I have run into is you have little time between the wedding and the reception. In my little experience, all of my receptions have been in a different location than the church. Knowing the schedule in advance and having a second person makes a big difference in getting the shots of them leaving the church and arriving at the reception hall, while you tear down.

    Lastly, bring some power bars or something to snack on -- even though there may be food everywhere, you rarely get a chance to sit down and eat anything.


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    #16
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    Thanks for the info guys. I am shooting a wedding this weekend for family. I will be at the rehersal and have access to the chapel and the reception hall prior to everyone being there. After they are decorated I am going to go and get a bunch of cut away shots, then I can focus on the ceremony with no worries (hopefully).


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    #17
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    I've always had bad luck having the 2nd camera up front.

    Either:

    a) someone stands in the way
    b) you only get one of the bridal couple

    I usually have the 2nd camera in the back as well either up in the balcony or up on a riser. That way I can get both of the bridal couple in the same shot and see BOTH their reactions to each other while saying the vows.


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    #18
    Senior Member cecil995's Avatar
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    If appropriate, try to talk with the officiant of the wedding and if they have done weddings there before, ask them where other videographers have placed cameras. They may come up with some areas you never thought of. (I have heard of this back-firing - the officiant may tell you where NOT to place a camera)
    Yeah, Don't ever let the officiant think that he can dictate how you will shoot your video. Its good to be respectfull to them, and being polite and willing to work with them, but I always tell him where I am going to be, and that I will not interfere or be a distraction in anyway.
    You're so money and you don't even know it!

    Dan Lewin, Videographer/Editor

    www.lewinmedia.com


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
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    #19
    Member Greypawn Films's Avatar
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    Monopods are essential if you are shooting a wedding solo. Tripods take a little time leveling and take up too much space (i.e. cake cutting is always crowded!). I like to use the monopod to get elevated shots of the dance floor, and if you lower it back down slowly you get a semi-crane shot.

    I require a CD with all the music that the Bride and Groom dance to. I open the shot with the DJ announcing who is gonna dance and then I fade out on the room audio and fade in to the CD.


    Nice posts, lets see some more!
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    Last edited by Greypawn Films; 05-08-2007 at 02:12 PM.


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    #20
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    It's allways interesting to see how wedding events in other countries are captured, I spend some time on a UK forum as well were I found big differences in the way weddings are dealth with compared to my country (Belgium)
    It seems that weddings in America or the UK are much more big business
    then here and that people are willing to pay much more money for it.

    I have been in the business now for 3 years and almost allways solo, if you have to work alone you develope a sixth sence during a shoot, because I know exactly what I want to achieve during editing I allready take that into consideration during a shoot. Another thing is that I always travel light, just take with me what I need. I have a special vest with a lot of pockets to fit all small gear and I have a special backpack which fits a second backup cam.

    For church and townhall I allways use a tripod (It's the only thing beside my camera I have to carry around then) and during the fotoshoot I always work handheld. In the evening I work partially handheld but also use a monopod which suspends in a heavy duty belt that I wear then, (You can't see the belt as my shirt hangs over it) I have a Sony vx2100 and a dvx that I use but I can't hold it longer then 10min straight on without getting tired, that's why I use the monopod which can be attached to the belt so I can shoot for an unlimited amount of time and get very steady shots at the same time, even when zooming in.

    I also use a samson zoom h4 for my audio recording in the townhall which is the most important part here in Belgium in regard to sound, I have considered using a clipon wireless mic but the zoom h4 suites my purpose better, it records the voices very clearly. In Church the sound is less important here, then I just get close enough to record the voices when they are putting on the rings as it is just a few sentences that are spoken then, the camera's inbuild mic is then sufficient.

    Furhermore I also made a chatbox which is quite popular, it's a box containing a harddisk recorder, a camera and a tv, the guests can say their best wishes into the camera (they can see themselves on the tv) and the recorder records from about 20:00 in the evening untill 6 in the morning, because it records unmanned people are very "loose", I have the most fun editing this when I see people being very polite in the beginning and acting out absolutely rediculous in the middle of the night when the beer starts working.

    Working alone like this does wear me down, the next day I am usualy a zombie and need about 2 days to recover, especially when they order the chatbox as well I have to drive back the next day real early to pick it up again.

    But even with all this stress it bring with it, I love every part of it, especially the editing part is someting I allways look forward to. I hope I can continue doing this for a long time.


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