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    #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    That's how I like to work as well, and it's one of my favorite features in FCP X...the ability to see a simple vertical checklist of "effects".

    The disabling, moving around, swapping; all so quick.

    Attachment 142612
    I've never used FCP X, but that vertical checklist that you posted looks like a really great thing! Maybe one day Resolve will "borrow" that idea, lol. Although I'm not sure how well it could be implemented seeing that Resolve is node based with layer, parallel and even RGB split nodes being different methods of combining and routing nodes. Or is that a checklist of effects within a single node or layer? Is FCP X node or layer based?


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    #12
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    Honestly, I can't pretend that I know what exactly a node is, lol.

    But based on the vertical checklist in FCP X, any "effects" there appear to be layers all working together. You can't isolate anything without having the other effects not be impacted or have an impact.

    The first one at the top is your starting point and everything you "layer" below moving forward affects the image. Anything you move up or down changes the results immediately (of course some changes are more aggressive than others like flipping two very diverse LUTs).

    People who appreciate a lot of meticulous control will not be impressed, but for copying-and-pasting and trial-and-error-like workflows for blazing your way through projects, it's ideal for me.


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    #13
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    It’s is important to understand which actions are destructive.

    For example
    Node1 sat =100
    Node 2 sat =-100

    Does this have any affect on the image? Or do they cancel out? What about the other way round?

    Once one has a handle on understanding these transforms the order becomes obvious.
    Last edited by morgan_moore; 03-05-2021 at 12:08 AM.


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    #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    Honestly, I can't pretend that I know what exactly a node is, lol.

    But based on the vertical checklist in FCP X, any "effects" there appear to be layers all working together. You can't isolate anything without having the other effects not be impacted or have an impact.

    The first one at the top is your starting point and everything you "layer" below moving forward affects the image. Anything you move up or down changes the results immediately (of course some changes are more aggressive than others like flipping two very diverse LUTs).

    People who appreciate a lot of meticulous control will not be impressed, but for copying-and-pasting and trial-and-error-like workflows for blazing your way through projects, it's ideal for me.
    Ah ok, yeah sounds layer based. I started in Adobe Premiere and actually used to do my color grading layer based in After Effects using the Color GHear (not a typo) presets and LUTs for anyone who remembers the Color GHear product. I moved onto Resolve when BMD released the free version and then based everything that I was doing on Juan Melara's tutorials which I always reiterate is one of the best resources when learning to color grade. To be honest I had only used serial nodes in Resolve for a long time and I didn't really start using the layers, parallel or RGB splitter nodes until about a year and a half ago and it opened up a much bigger world of color grading for me.

    Anyways to get back on topic, yes as Morgan mentioned above me, knowing which actions are destructive is key as well. I believe as it is operating at 32bit floating (someone more technical can please correct me if I am wrong) just about every color effect in Resolve is non-destructive EXECPT for LUTs that are on nodes. If you clip the LUT you cannot pull it back in following serial node, which is why it is typical a good idea to use it last.


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    #15
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    And this, ladies and gentlemen, anonymous or known by name, is why I appreciate this forum so much.

    Learning every day.


    2 out of 2 members found this post helpful.
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