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    Storing unused ion lithium camera batteries?
    #1
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    I have a LOT of lithium batteries... GHx series, Lumix Sx Series, EVA1 SWIT batteries, Sony batteries, internal batteries from misc. devices etc. With COVID everything has been sitting now for a year or so (I've only done remote post work).

    Is there anything I need to (or should have been doing?) doing in terms of storing/charging my batteries? I went to prep for running some personal camera tests, and my cameras were dead having drained the batteries and I had to reset times, etc. Many batteries not in the camera were either 100% dead or down to like 20%.

    1. Is this bad? If so how bad? Can it degrade capacity/longevity of the batteries?
    2. What are best practices for longer term storage unused?

    Or just charge 'em up, and good to go again?


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    #2
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    Some product manuals used to recommend storing them at 40% or so for several months but I don't know if that's recommended anymore (at least for every battery).

    They are all probably fine. You would have to be using the cameras everyday all day long with the batteries to know if they are not unless a fully-charged one is immediately malfunctioning.


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    #3
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    Thanks Norbro, yeah, the funny thing about storing at 40% is that they just drain back to zero anyhow yeah?

    As long as there is no harm in storing batteries too long at 0% I suppose no harm no foul?


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    #4
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    I think you'll be okay...but I'd be tempted to sell anything I don't use too much. lol


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    #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    I think you'll be okay...but I'd be tempted to sell anything I don't use too much. lol
    Aha fair point. I suspect I'll be back to shooting this year with the arrival of the vaccines, etc. but I did lose a solid year of value on the camera bodies going unused I suppose :/


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    #6
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    It's not a good idea to let Li-ion's go down to 0%. I've had more than one older Li-ion batt get accidentally run down to 0%(either left on gear or just sat too long off charge) and they were never able to be charged again. When at home, I leave all of my camera batteries on their chargers, as they are designed to store the batteries on them "indefinitely"(at least "bricks"). Of course, this does depend on how many batteries you have and how many charging slots.


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    #7
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    Long term storage of lithium batteries - yep, we've all been there with this pandemic! I read years ago that it's best not to store them fully charged so I try and store them at around 40-60%. But (and this is important) check them every now and again (ideally monthly) and if necessary top them up a bit to keep them in that mid-range area. As already mentioned, letting them degrade to 0% will risk them never working again. Storing batteries at 100% will also not do them much good.

    Also, I have several cameras that I rarely use (Canon C100 for instance). Every few months I get it out of the bag and plug it into the mains charger and just leave it (off) but plugged in for 24hrs. I believe this helps maintain any charge in the internal batteries within the cameras - and so rarely have to reset everything after a period of non-use.


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    #8
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    For Li-Ion batteries you should top them off (full charge) and then refresh every three months or so. When you refresh it’s good to “wake up” the chemistry in the cells, so use them a little before recharging to full. If a camera battery lasts three hours, 15-20 minutes is enough to reactivate them. Try not to let a Li-Ion battery drain to zero. If you have slow (trickle) chargers and fast chargers, use the trickle.
    Mitch Gross
    NYC


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    #9
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    I'm sure Mitch must know better than me but this is the kind of info that has lead me to the storage regime I posted earlier:

    https://zeusbatteryproducts.wordpres...home-business/

    https://news.umich.edu/tips-for-exte...ion-batteries/


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    #10
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    From my experience, I would not leave them in storage for long periods at zero charge. I have had a substantial amount of batteries lose their capacity and become unpredictable because of this. Some batteries or devices with built in batteries that I purchased new and charged only a couple of times, went from 2 hours of use, to only 15 minutes because I let it drain to zero and forgot all about it.

    Nowadays, I assign the start of every second month to top up or check all my batteries or devices with batteries in them. Set it on your Calendar program to notify you every second month and it makes it much easier to keep track of.

    I place all batteries or devices with built-in batteries in one location. That way, I know all these devices need to be charged, otherwise if I keep them in different places, there is always bound to be one battery/device that I forgot was located there and end up draining to zero.
    Last edited by analogs; 03-26-2021 at 01:30 AM.


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