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    #11
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    I hope that’s true for N.Y.. I certainly am not amused by some folks gleeful predictions of its demise. Once artists and non conventional folks and paycheck to paycheck plus are priced out , most of what made places great are severely diminished. Once Austin lost cheap pints, cheap rent but more importantly people of all economic situations lost the ability to breathe it lost what’s special. You could always walk down the streets of Austin and say hi to strangers and many times have a conversation. I hope all cities become vibrant and soulful and liveable in the future.


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    #12
    Senior Member ahalpert's Avatar
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    Oddly, the artists and nonconventional folks have long outlasted cheap rent in NYC. My first apartment was in Greenwich Village and I was subletting a room from a guy who had been there since like 1972. It was rent controlled and cost like $400/month. At market rates it would be 2500 or 3000 or more.

    Artists these days are just pushing out further and further into the outer boroughs and taking on more and more roommates. But NYC has a lot of opportunities you cant get elsewhere, even in some other cities.

    The pandemic will actually help rebalance the equation to make rent more affordable, at least for now. A conversion of some office towers into residential wouldn't hurt either.

    It's also possible that millennials will emigrate to the suburbs once they start having children and alleviate the housing pressure that way. That's what happened to my wife and me even though we fit in much better in the boroughs


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    #13
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    By and large, the post Thanksgiving spike seems either small, mixed, or non existent? Here in Oregon there was one day that was much higher followed by a drop to levels lower than pre Thanksgiving.

    I expected much worse with so many people flying and gathering. Thoughts? Why wasn’t this more dramatic?


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    #14
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    I hope it's small or non-existent but my thoughts include what I said a few months ago in II:

    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    IMO, accurate record-keeping of a virus is impossible.

    The graph on the last page is pretty (the AI), but its data is coming from somewhere.

    And I know the source includes some of the brightest minds in the world, but they can't do it all by themselves.

    Numbers are coming from multiple places and consider that the task of testing, verifying, and trusting those results for dozens, hundreds and eventually (maybe) 330 million people is a big one.
    ___

    Numbers are probably still coming...it's only 4 days after Christmas.


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    #15
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    Friends of friends are going to a (semi-orthodox) Jewish wedding. Except the wedding ceremonies are prohibited in California. They do decide to take Covid tests prior to the event. The tests are not free and are paid for by bride's family (they have money). So, after taking them, the lady friend (of friends) in question is told by the clinic, "We will send the results to the people who paid for it". She's a lawyer. So she says to the clinic, "No effin' way. My medical records are private. Don't even think about this". So, they had to give them only to her. She says she'll inform the organizers of the wedding. Which is still prohibited.


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    #16
    Senior Member Liam Hall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by filmguy123 View Post
    By and large, the post Thanksgiving spike seems either small, mixed, or non existent? Here in Oregon there was one day that was much higher followed by a drop to levels lower than pre Thanksgiving.

    I expected much worse with so many people flying and gathering. Thoughts? Why wasn’t this more dramatic?
    I find that perplexing. Certainly, here in the UK, we are already seeing a post-Christmas spike. It could be people are taking mask wering and social distancing seriously in the US, it could also be under-reporting. If you look at excess mortality, it is spiking above 455,000 for this year, way above official US figures for COVID. Something's not right.
    "There is nothing permanent except change."
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    #17
    Senior Member ahalpert's Avatar
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    Supposedly there wasn't too much travel in the US during Thanksgiving. Christmas seems to be another story. and there are rumors of big illicit new year's eve parties in the works.

    Re:vaccines -

    Screenshot_20201229-163813_Chrome.jpg

    We're at like 2 million vaccinations in the US rn. No way we hit 20 million by year's end


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    #18
    Senior Member Liam Hall's Avatar
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    Vaccine delivery should ramp up when the Oxford/Astra Zeneca vaccine gets approved. It's the only one that will make a significant impact. We're expecting that to happen later this week in the UK with delivery from next Monday. If the Government don't screw up distribution they should be able to vaccinate 2 million people a week so we'll have all the vulnerable and over 50s done by Spring and effective herd immunity by summer.
    "There is nothing permanent except change."
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    #19
    Senior Member ahalpert's Avatar
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    Yeah but astra Zeneca was only 70% effective in the proper trials

    And delivery isn't our primary problem. NY has only administered 20% of the vaccines it has received
    Last edited by ahalpert; 12-29-2020 at 03:31 PM.


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    #20
    Senior Member Liam Hall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahalpert View Post
    Yeah but astra Zeneca was only 70% effective in the proper trials

    And delivery isn't our primary problem. NY has only administered 20% of the vaccines it has received
    It's claimed to be 95% effective with the way the two doses are now to be administered (disclaimer - they are a client of mine and no, I haven't read the data). The flu vaccine is less than 70%, so it would still a viable vaccine at that level
    "There is nothing permanent except change."
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