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    What frame rate was this video filmed at?
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    https://youtu.be/Zp9spNjCd5c

    Hello! I’m here to ask the community if they can discern what resolution and frame rate this video was filmed at. This video was filmed using an ac160 for the digital shots, and an arri SR2 for the film shots, should be easy to tell to two apart. I’m not sure if it’s filmed at 1080 30p, 1080 60i, or 720 60p and up-ressed to 1080? Or if there’s a different combination of recording and exporting settings used to obtain this look? I’m just really not sure, but would love to hear everyone’s opinions. Thanks so much!


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    #2
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    The file is 30fps, but that doesn't mean all of the original footage is 30p.

    Could be a mix in a 30p timeline.

    As far as the resolution, also could be a mix. (And it's very common to upres 720p to 1080p.)


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    Senior Member Peter C.'s Avatar
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    It says at the beginning it was shot on Kodak 16mm film.


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    Flipping around the film you could see the difference between the film and digital acquisition.

    Highly doubt they would use film for a lot of the trick sessions as it sometimes takes all day for people to nail a few of the more impressive ones (I used to film skateboarding).

    Would be crazy expensive and an insane hassle to use 16mm for everything, even for Vans.


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    They have a huge budget from vans, and probably a deal with Kodak. Many of the tricks are filmed on 16mm, you’d be surprised how hardcore these guys are with using the SR2. But the visual distinction is pretty clear between the two. Knowing the filmmaker (tanner pendleton) it is extremely consistent. I am almost positive all of the digital footage is filmed at the same frame rate/resolution. I don’t think he’d have it be a mix, especially for a project of this caliber. Mainly just wondering if anyone has a lot of experience working with the ac160 (or the hpx or hvx would be pretty similar as well) and thinks they could tell how this exact look was achieved. The slomo seems a bit smooth for 30p, but also the footage in general seems too crisp for 720 60p or 1080 60i. It might be more simple than I’m thinking, but these guys are real masters and might have a clever combo of recording settings and export settings to get this look. Would be interesting to see if anyone on this forum can crack the mystery haha!


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    Honestly, I think it's much more simple than you're thinking...

    And the beauty is also in the eye of the beholder...or snowboarder, haha.

    Like anyone who loves this stuff loves this stuff.

    And I love this stuff, but this look is pretty mediocre and how most of these kind of old videos look. A lot of 30p or 60i (transcoded to 30p). Terrible DR, low resolution...but that's beautiful nostalgia for me.

    As far as the slow-motion...

    Back in the day (but after SD cameras), it was common to shoot 720/60p for the slow-motion and just throw it into a 1080p timeline because our cameras maxed out at 1080/30p. That was the correct way to do it even if some were worried about upscaling (in reality no one ever noticed). If the Panasonic has variable framerate recording then the overcranking would have been done in the camera and the files would be 30p to match the other footage (or 24p if desired).

    With that said, there are still major films that shoot 24p too:

    AOF was ahead of its time...



    A really nice one in the middle of RED's glory days...



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    Ddde
    Last edited by somethingelse; 03-25-2021 at 05:23 AM.


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    Senior Member Peter C.'s Avatar
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    Why would it matter what frame rate it was filmed. Take any feature film do you know what lens, camera, or it's settings? No because tools are incidental to the content produced. Do you know what brush Michelangelo used? Even if you I could tell you and you could buy it wouldn't matter.


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    So nobody has an answer for this? Hard to believe nobody on this forum can figure it out! I thought y’all would have an easy time figuring it out


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    We wish we could help, man - but this is a very rare question I personally haven't seen asked. (Maybe it was more common 10 years ago...)

    It's actually almost always the opposite and people saying they upscaled their 720p or 1080p and wondering if we can see which shots are which in a higher resolution master. (Most commonly done with older cameras that only had 60p in 720 or newer cameras that only had 60p in 1080.)

    You don't sound like you're new to video, but maybe?

    Because asking if we can if it's 720/60p, 1080p (30i or 60p) with such poor resolution in a 30p timeline is just impossible.

    ___

    Here's the deal...

    If it was 60p, maybe we could be able to tell a little from some of the motion of the clips, but half of those frames were thrown out by the NLE effectively altering 60p's native look.

    If it was 30i, the footage most likely went through a blurring process, and because it's such low-resolution you wouldn't be able to tell if any detail was lost anyway.

    Now the reason I think it's a mix is not only because of the reason I shared with you that it was truly an industry-standard to upscale 720/60p because this was the BEST way of achieving slow-motion in these cameras, but also because the slow-motion in the video looks good (and it rarely would ever look good with 30p...even with post-production because there are not enough frames for smooth motion).

    I know you want a straight, confident answer - but I truly don't think you will find one based on the nature of this inquiry.


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