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    Anyone using a Syrp Magic Carpet Pro with their C200?
    #1
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    Thinking of picking one of these up. Need something to occasionally handle a rigged up C200 (or slightly larger).
    Anyone have one of these that can offer thoughts on build quality, setup time, general feel/function?

    Thinking I can eventually pick up the Genie II kit to run a mirrorless on a bounce-back pattern for the occasional
    2-cam interview with the C200 on sticks.

    Worthwhile purchase, or nah? I'm curious how many of you are taking a slider like this on set these days. It's either
    this one, go smaller (rhino, likely just for the mirrorless), or go full on with a Dana Dolly kit.

    Any feedback appreciated, thanks.


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    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    I have the Rhino EVO Motion and I used to barely ever use it. I think I went a year and a half without taking it out of it's case other than to
    charge the batteries. But I recently shot a piece for Katzkin Leather Car Interiors and I used it a TON and the client was really stoked with the macro/moving shots I shot
    of the car interiors with it.

    But the second off-axis moving camera look for interviews I feel is VERY played out. Not that it looks bad, it looks cool
    but so many have done it that it definitely doesn't feel fresh or interesting anymore. I rarely do it anymore. If I do two cameras
    mostly, it's either two lockoffs or one wider lockoff and maybe a hand moved moving shot with a CU. Problem is in interviews,
    the off axis motion control movement usually feels unmotivated so it's just a gimmick. There's no reason a robotocially smooth
    off axis shot is needed or motivated IMHO.

    But for product shots, tabletop, etc. slider with motion control is still a great tool. So the bottom line is, if you shoot things that have a reason
    to have a smooth robotically controlled shot like product, makes sense. For interviews, I think you're wasting your money.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by puredrifting View Post
    I have the Rhino EVO Motion and I used to barely ever use it. I think I went a year and a half without taking it out of it's case other than to
    charge the batteries. But I recently shot a piece for Katzkin Leather Car Interiors and I used it a TON and the client was really stoked with the macro/moving shots I shot
    of the car interiors with it.

    But the second off-axis moving camera look for interviews I feel is VERY played out. Not that it looks bad, it looks cool
    but so many have done it that it definitely doesn't feel fresh or interesting anymore.
    I rarely do it anymore. If I do two cameras
    mostly, it's either two lockoffs or one wider lockoff and maybe a hand moved moving shot with a CU. Problem is in interviews,
    the off axis motion control movement usually feels unmotivated so it's just a gimmick. There's no reason a robotocially smooth
    off axis shot is needed or motivated IMHO.

    But for product shots, tabletop, etc. slider with motion control is still a great tool. So the bottom line is, if you shoot things that have a reason
    to have a smooth robotically controlled shot like product, makes sense. For interviews, I think you're wasting your money.

    On the one hand, it gives you a nice wide to show off the room/space, IF you have a nice interesting space. But, as you said, EVERYONE does it and has been doing it for years, now. AND it makes lighting the interview properly a pain in the a s s. It almost always compromises the primary shot. And I have at least one producer who does not like the robotic/automated sliders for the sliding two. I'm not sure if it's just the "too perfect" movement or because you can't feel out and time the moves to questions and answers like a human op can or maybe a combination of the two.


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    Thanks, this is great feedback. I feel much the same about the interview setup. I think it would be used moreso for product b-roll and the like, perhaps the rare motion control situation. I've heard good things about Rhino's motion control with the new Arc system, I'm just not sure that system could handle a larger rig. But maybe that doesn't matter with how good mirrorless cams are these days.


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    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Blonde View Post
    Thanks, this is great feedback. I feel much the same about the interview setup. I think it would be used moreso for product b-roll and the like, perhaps the rare motion control situation. I've heard good things about Rhino's motion control with the new Arc system, I'm just not sure that system could handle a larger rig. But maybe that doesn't matter with how good mirrorless cams are these days.
    I pretty much use it with the X-T3, no need for my C200 in a slider when the X-T3 looks 90% as good with good lighting.
    Shot this piece for Katzkin Leather, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0Df...ature=youtu.be so you can see I used it for the spokesperson (the editor didn't use that angle much)
    but I used it for all of the CU and macro stuff and the client loved it. The Rhino has been pretty good over the years, has never broken down
    or stopped working. These rigs are really kind of a one trick pony though, two maybe if you shoot timelapse?

    This video is 35 min long so just skim around.
    Last edited by puredrifting; 12-02-2020 at 06:35 PM.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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