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    wire on the rode lavalier is too thin (question)
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    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...Con_Cable.html
    Hi everyone, i use this wire for the lavalier and then i plug the wire on a xlr cable and the xlr cable to the camcorder.

    But i find the wire very thin and it's risky to pull the wire too hard.

    What would you guys do with this kind of wire?
    What do you use when you use long wire for lavalier ?

    Thanks in advance,
    Deleuze3


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    Moderator Alex H.'s Avatar
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    Lav cables are thin. That’s kind of their thing. Bulky cables are harder to dress, especially when running through/underneath wardrobe.

    And yes, they can be delicate. The last thing ever to do to a lav is to pull it by the cable.

    Some of the best lavs out there - and I’m talking about lavs that run in the $500+ range, like the DPA 4060 - have incredibly thin cables. Countryman B3 and especially B6 also have thin cables. It’s just the way it is. Whether connecting straight to a wireless transmitter, or adapting to XLR connection for a longer cable run, you just have to handle the lav cable with some common sense in order to avoid damaging it. Plus, you want to make sure that there’s an ample amount of slack wherever the cable hangs, to avoid unintentional tugs and pulls that could damage it. If it’s hanging off the talent, use Transpore (medical tape) to tape a relief loop a few inches below the mic capsule. On the camera end, use a Velcro cable tie or similar to strap relief to the camera’s top handle. And there should be plenty of extra cable to run across the floor: the cable shouldn’t be stretched at all between talent and camera.
    Knoxville-based location sound mixer.

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    Common concern...can't do anything but be careful or use/buy another product with a thicker wire gauge.


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    If this is a hardwired interview type setup, the lav should plug directly into a regular XLR cable . The connection should be secured to them (in a pocket, tucked in the waistband). Then regular XLR cable, which is more robust is run to the camera.


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    Senior Member Peter C.'s Avatar
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    For interviews the camera will be with in 10' of the subject and an un-shielded cable will be fine. Most standard pro wired lavs will come with an adapter that converts to a standard shielded xlr cable. These type of mics are designed to be used with dslr/mirrorless that don't have xlr. It's kind of pointless going from mini to xlr back to mini for that short of distance.
    Last edited by Peter C.; 11-22-2020 at 05:14 PM.


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    You can reinforce the cable at both ends with a product known as Bondic ... it is an epoxy similar to that used in dentistry.
    Cured with the supplied UV light.

    I have save a number of cables with this ... better to do it prior to stressing the cable ... it ends up being a bit malleable
    and can be reinforced again if needed.


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    Moderator Alex H.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmoore View Post
    You can reinforce the cable at both ends with a product known as Bondic ... it is an epoxy similar to that used in dentistry.
    Cured with the supplied UV light.

    I have save a number of cables with this ... better to do it prior to stressing the cable ... it ends up being a bit malleable
    and can be reinforced again if needed.
    The whole point of the MiCon connection is that it is detachable, and allows for quick swapping of connector types. If you epoxy it in place, it’s ruined.
    Knoxville-based location sound mixer.

    Instagram @sonolocus


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    In the studio I used to manage, we probably had to deal with a dozen or so lavalier cable failures every year. My precision soldering skills were greatly enhanced by the experience of replacing the tiny cables on our Sony ECM-30 mics, which I was eventually able to do with about 90% success on the first try. The Rode Lavalier improves on these in two ways : (1) the MicOn system allows you to replace cables easily without tools, and (2) the cables include a Kevlar fiber reinforcement that should make them much more resistant to breaking, at least against stresses in the lengthwise direction. Probably not much good for preventing shearing or over-flexing the cable. I have four of the Rode lavs with MicOn cables nowadays and bought a spare cable for each one - although I haven't had to use any of them yet.

    My more serious lavs are Sennheiser MKE2's, and these have a steel reinforced cable that seems more rugged than the Rodes, although they're all approximately the same diameter. But they're not field replaceable and are enough stiffer than the Rode Kevlar cables to be annoying in some circumstances. They also tend to pick up more handling noise. Shure also uses heavily steel reinforced cables on its pro lavalier mics (and claims they're "100 times" more durable than the competition - seems a little unlikely to me). I'm not sure about Sanken and others.

    But the bottom line is that lavalier cables have to be thin and flexible, and they're subject to a lot of potential stresses and hazards in use. They're therefore relatively delicate and can be devilishly tricky to repair because of their small size. You always need spares, whether of the cable alone in the MicOn system, or of the whole microphone otherwise.


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    What I have done in the past where a lot of movement or possible pulling on the mic cable could happen is the following. I've deployed a two very small soft rubber bands stress relief system, configured as below. If the cable gets pulled on hard it will pull one or two loops out without too much strain on the cable. Using three 3" loop reverses along with the lead in and out lengths when pulled right out will give you around 12-15" of strain relief. By then, hopefully, even the most ham-fisted talent should be aware they are snagged on something or have a mic problem. Keep the bands in a bit from the ends to avoid too harsh a bend in the cables when forming the loops. Used frequently over the years in range of physically active shoots and so far so good.

    Chris Young

    Band relief.jpg


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    The cables on these rode lavs are the most fragile cables I have ever worked with in the last 25 years of remote sports, news, and education. They have also decided that they no longer will make them detach at both ends (at least last time I bought the microphone elements), we got stung by that during the transition of this change.

    We have a very large pile of broken micon cables at work, these have been the single least reliable part of the gear we send out with students. The Countryman EMW mics lasted 6 years, these rode get about 2 to 4 months before I have to replace cables because the gear comes back with a report of not working. The breakage point is almost universally right at the strain relief on the electronics end (xlr). The "relief" does not flex, all it provides is a very small radius bend (sharp corner). Strain reliefs like this are supposed to bend to provide a larger radius bend and prevent the sharp corner.

    And the replacement cables recently went up in price.

    Trying to beg for enough money to replace all the mics in the field kits with OST or go back to the EMW. The OST have been doing good in the studio, and they are a little cheaper, and would give me a single common part to stock for eventual repairs.


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