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    #11
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    and hope a bird doesn't fly though. You will need a good script supervisor for this shot.


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    #12
    Senior Member Batutta's Avatar
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    One other thought, if you really don't want to deal with compositing, make the wide shot so wide you can't really make out the characters mouths well, shoot without the boom in shot and then just use the dialogue from the close ups.
    "Money doesn't make films...You just do it and take the initiative." - Werner Herzog


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    #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Batutta View Post
    One other thought, if you really don't want to deal with compositing, make the wide shot so wide you can't really make out the characters mouths well, shoot without the boom in shot and then just use the dialogue from the close ups.
    Absolutely this, a technique that’s been around (and very effective) for a very long time.

    It’s easy to see the master shot only, and to start to worry about how you’re going to cover audio. Unless it’s a single-shot, one-take kind of deal, you’ll have coverage to work with. The super-wide shots are typically used only for a few seconds anyway.

    There are also creative ways of dealing with sound on the master shot. Plant mics are immensely helpful if there are props or set pieces in the right places; even if they are only able to grab enough for editing and ADR reference, they’ve done enough. There are also wireless systems that are small enough to hide just about anywhere, including bathing suits (and some of those transmitters are even waterproof).

    I’ve worked in both scenarios (shooting a :30 plate, or relying strictly on coverage) many times, but more often we go with coverage rather than shooting a plate. To make the plate work takes a lot of attention to detail as well as consistent lighting.
    Knoxville-based location sound mixer.

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    #14
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Batutta View Post
    One other thought, if you really don't want to deal with compositing, make the wide shot so wide you can't really make out the characters mouths well, shoot without the boom in shot and then just use the dialogue from the close ups.
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex H. View Post
    Absolutely this, a technique that’s been around (and very effective) for a very long time.

    It’s easy to see the master shot only, and to start to worry about how you’re going to cover audio. Unless it’s a single-shot, one-take kind of deal, you’ll have coverage to work with. The super-wide shots are typically used only for a few seconds anyway.

    There are also creative ways of dealing with sound on the master shot. Plant mics are immensely helpful if there are props or set pieces in the right places; even if they are only able to grab enough for editing and ADR reference, they’ve done enough. There are also wireless systems that are small enough to hide just about anywhere, including bathing suits (and some of those transmitters are even waterproof).

    I’ve worked in both scenarios (shooting a :30 plate, or relying strictly on coverage) many times, but more often we go with coverage rather than shooting a plate. To make the plate work takes a lot of attention to detail as well as consistent lighting.
    This is what I've been thinking... If it's just the master wide and you're going to go in and shoot for coverage, you get the dialogue then.


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    Thanks guys,
    I haven't made a film in a couple of years and I just forgot, 'schmuck how long are you going to be on the master?' Not long. Yes it's what I did in the past - grab some lines from the coverage. Whew. Thanks everyone.


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    #16
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    Are you saying that you have ONLY Wide Shots? Is this scripted? Or "reality" ad-lib, unprdictable?

    Assuming scripted, is there a WS "establishing shot" or "cover shot", and then Close Up shots of each of the characters?
    Isn't it common practice to edit the scene with the CU shots (and accompanying dialog tracks)?
    And then cut to the WS but using the CU dialog tracks.


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    #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevin baggott View Post
    Shooting a pilot in coming weeks and I have a lot of Wide Shots where I wont be able to hide the mic (lav or boom) - example a pool scene - is it common to mask the boom guy in post?
    I've had editors in the past do some of this masking on a shot or two - but it was pretty time consuming. I know it's best to do this on static shots.
    Appreciate any advice. Thanks
    Paint the boom equipment green. Key it out, and rotoscope/garbage matte only what you can't key out.

    Occasionally shoot some clean plates, if you think you need it.

    But don't take my word for it, maybe test it with a painted green broom or stick. see how it goes. Maybe A green mic would cause other issues with refelections.

    Camera and audio stores should sell green foam pop filters for most mic sizes.

    I've seen all this done, but never did it myself.
    Last edited by James0b57; 11-30-2020 at 01:53 AM.


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    #18
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    For locked off shots (and you've got a VFX advisor on set), of course paint out the boom as much as possible.

    Get this too:
    https://www.greensleeve.london/
    https://www.pro-sound.com/p/greensle...ole-cover.html
    Am a Sound Recordist in New Zealand: http://ironfilm.co.nz/sound/
    Follow my vlog and adventures in sound: https://www.youtube.com/c/SoundSpeeding


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    #19
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    You can immediately after each scene record audio Without cameras rolling. I know a guy essentially making omb feature length niche films that were very profitable using that technique. Many scenes were recorded in a makeshift sound booth/Trailer on set of popular ex-spy in Miami tv series.


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    #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevin baggott View Post
    Shooting a pilot in coming weeks and I have a lot of Wide Shots where I wont be able to hide the mic (lav or boom) - example a pool scene - is it common to mask the boom guy in post?
    I've had editors in the past do some of this masking on a shot or two - but it was pretty time consuming. I know it's best to do this on static shots.
    Appreciate any advice. Thanks
    I would say a consideration is overdubbing wide shots.. shoot it wide then shoot it tight with a conventionally placed boom (18in), use the audio from the tight shot over the wide image. Or even just record the actors static but Ive not done that apart from the odd word.

    Will work best on a really wide as the lips will be hard to see.


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