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    Ryzen 5000 Series (Zen 3)
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    AMD releases Ryzen 5000 series:
    https://www.theverge.com/2020/10/8/2...e-release-date

    Available 11/5

    This is big news for us, wondering if anyone else has dived into this. Intel has held the single core advantage at the upper echelons, whilst AMD has held the multicore advantage. The 5950x in particular is 16-cores with 3.6 base/4.9 boost and now bests Intel, supposedly, in single-core due to its enhanced speeds and IPC.

    I was planning a Threadripper build, but I think I am going to go Ryzen 5950x instead. It's only 105 TDP vs 280w TDP on Threadripper. You can kit 128gb dual channel RAM into it, and quad channel memory doesn't seem a big benefit for most of us. You can get motherboards with plenty of I/O - I'm looking at the MSI Prestige Creator X570 board with a bunch of PCI-E ports, 10g LAN for a QNAP, and a bunch of USB 3 ports (including a few Gen 2 ports and a USB-C) and ability to add more in via PCI-E. Meanwhile, Nvidia as of last month is finally beta-testing NVIDIA GPU decoding. Paired with a new RTX 3080 the timeline should be blazing fast. The only thing Threadripper really seems it could offer is similar timeline performance speeds, but much faster final render/encode output speeds.

    Anyone else thinking of a Ryzen 5000 series build for their next edit rig? Price/performance seems through the roof, the AM4/X570 platform is mature, and its just a lean and practical build compared to a Threadripper. Much easier to cool, and has got it where it counts with plenty of cores and killer single-core IPC. Seems to be the best of both worlds now.

    (and for anyone who missed it, the RTX 3080 GPU should be killer especially combined with Adobe's coming decode support (making plugins like Cinegy by Daniel2 unneccessary)):

    https://www.anandtech.com/show/16057...-3080-rtx-3090

    (A lot of these are advertised with gaming as there's more money in it, but the performance correlation is closely tied to video performance)


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    Oh man, I just built a PC with the 3950x. Is this really that different, I wonder? It's also 16-core but 3.5/4.7 so not that different in speed it would seem. Anyway, it should be fast enough for me. I'm waiting for one of the 300 series Nvidia GPUs to become available again, since the 3080s have been sold out and the 3070s aren't supposed to be available until end of the month, if then. But that's right about when AMD is releasing their new GPUs... I still should probably go with one of the Nvidias because they tend to work better with Premiere Pro.

    The threadrippers are definitely overkill, unless maybe you do heavy color grading in Resolve with RAW media or something like that. You can see a lot of the performance stats and reviews at the best site I know of for this information, Pugetsystems.com.


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    Can you link to any info on your mention of NVidia's GPU decoding beta tests?


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    I already pre ordered j/k. I'd still like one but usually there is only a small 5-10% improvement between generations where there isn't a substantial change which I would put this in that category. If your software primarily uses the GPU then there might be no speed difference.
    Last edited by Peter C.; 10-11-2020 at 08:03 PM.


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    I did see this and watched the YouTube video for the product release. It looks like a great processor. I wish the chipset was not 4th generation as most certainly one will need to buy a new motherboard for the next processor (Zen 4). This means no drop-in upgrade. Not a huge deal but also a bummer.

    I am using a 10-core Skylake X processor from 2017, so I would consider the 5950x to be a decent upgrade. I might go for it if the reviews are positive and performance is there. I think 10-16 cores is the sweet spot for video editing anyway. Glad to see the emphasis on single core performance as I believe the industry had become complacent (sort of like the megapixel race) in just throwing more cores at largely single threaded workloads. It is amazing how quickly Intel has fallen behind in some respects. They better get it together as I see AMD going in for the kill with Zen 4 after more people adapt from the this new Zen 3 product line.


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    Senior Member Teddy_Dem's Avatar
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    One of my biggest questions for the AMD''s Zen 3 and also Nvidia's new RTX GPU's would be can they decode the new 10bit 4:2:2 H265 files that we are beginning to see in the new camera's like the Canon R5 and Sony A7SIII? Currently they are difficult to deal with and I have to transcode them first.
    Last edited by Teddy_Dem; 10-12-2020 at 07:10 AM.


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    Yep. Transcoding is a fail imho for the computer industry. So far, they have not kept up very well with the resolution increases in the video world. Mainly because Intel has been asleep. AMD looks to be passing them and lets hope they keep their foot on the gas.


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    H.265 4k and up is going to push very high processing loads to decode regardless of whether CPU or GPU is used. You are looking at a codec that compresses 4k into the same data bandwidth as 2K with equivalent IQ, requiring 4x the processing power and ram required for decoding and GOP buffering of H.264 HD video. It is going to take 64GB minimum ram and fast multi-core systems to do this in real time. NLE's are still not quite up to speed dealing with H.265, but realistically it is the hardware overhead that will limit many of us to proxy edits.
    Frankly I transcode all H.xxx long GOP video footage to 10 bit 4:2:2 /BWF PCM audio DI masters (not proxies) for editing. I prefer Cineform for PC's but DNXHD/HR or Prores are fine too. Editing performance and quality of exports to any kind of deliverable format are much better than with long GOP compressed originals. Saves a lot of technical headaches in the editing and finishing process. Worth the time and storage costs IMO.


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    It is messy. Storage has kept up with the changes. So maybe the h.265 is kind of wasted compression? Embracing larger memory cards would ease the strain on the editing side. Anyway, how does the quality of export improve by transcoding away from the original? I would think the original would represent the highest quality possible with that footage and anything after would only equal or be less.


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    Quote Originally Posted by mothmachine View Post
    I just built a PC with the 3950x. Is this really that different, I wonder? ....The threadrippers are definitely overkill, unless maybe you do heavy color grading in Resolve with RAW media or something like that.
    ~15% ballpark improvement over the 3950x according to AMD, largely due to more IPC and faster single core performance. Not sure if that's worth an upgrade for you, though with selling a 3950x and writing off a 5950x it might be almost free to upgrade.

    Yes, I was leaning Threadripper originally but the benchmarks for live playback are very close on the 3950x and will be superior with 5950x. 16 cores is plenty of speed for exports for my workflow, I wouldn't want to lose my exporting coffee breaks afterall. I am not a render farm or high throughput post house! By the time you deal with the psu needs, thermals, cooling, etc. of a 280w TDP on Threadripper and all the added expense of the platform (as reasonable as it is for what it is relatively) the 5950x just seems far more nimble and practical. I'd rather upgrade again in 3 years with the $$ saved...

    Quote Originally Posted by ozmorphasis View Post
    Can you link to any info on your mention of NVidia's GPU decoding beta tests?
    Yes, Sep 7 by Adobe - currently in beta, part of the next version hopefully but you could access now via beta (they are still working out the kinks).

    Nvidia Thread
    https://community.adobe.com/t5/premi...1415455?page=1
    AMD Thread
    https://community.adobe.com/t5/premi...1415460?page=1

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C. View Post
    I'd still like one but usually there is only a small 5-10% improvement between generations where there isn't a substantial change which I would put this in that category.
    19% boost to IPC, they are estimating 14% in Premiere Pro improvement. I would wait for 3rd party benchmarks and reviews but this one seems to be more than the usual performance bump and finally bests Intel single core. Whether its worth an upgrade if you own a 3950x though, maybe but I tend to wait for a total jump of 50%-100% in performance over a number of years.

    The other big thing on this gen is the improved chiplet design which moves 8 cores to share the same cache pool rather than 4, reducing latency.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassman2003 View Post
    I wish the chipset was not 4th generation as most certainly one will need to buy a new motherboard for the next processor (Zen 4). This means no drop-in upgrade. Not a huge deal but also a bummer.
    Agreed, though, my thought process is this: I think we will see one more new chip on AM4 platform before AMD fully switches to DDR5. And either way, I don't want to early adopt on DDR5. It will be very pricey at first. While I don't love the idea of not having a significant drop in upgrade path, the reality is this is a mature platform and probably not worth making another switch away from again for a number of years until DDR5 is mature and there's more significant performance jumps.

    Quote Originally Posted by Teddy_Dem View Post
    One of my biggest questions for the AMD''s Zen 3 and also Nvidia's new RTX GPU's would be can they decode the new 10bit 4:2:2 H265 files that we are beginning to see in the new camera's like the Canon R5 and Sony A7SIII? Currently they are difficult to deal with and I have to transcode them first.
    Yes, if you a 3000 RTX series the NVIDIA decoder, which will be officially supported in Premiere Pro once it leaves beta (its been in beta since Sep 7), you will be able to use GPU accelerated decoding for up to 12-bit 4:4:4 H265. See the chart for NVDEC here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nvidia_NVDEC

    Quote Originally Posted by Razz16mm View Post
    H.265 4k and up is going to push very high processing loads to decode regardless of whether CPU or GPU is used. You are looking at a codec that compresses 4k into the same data bandwidth as 2K with equivalent IQ, requiring 4x the processing power and ram required for decoding and GOP buffering of H.264 HD video. It is going to take 64GB minimum ram and fast multi-core systems to do this in real time. NLE's are still not quite up to speed dealing with H.265, but realistically it is the hardware overhead that will limit many of us to proxy edits.
    Yeah, I am very curious to see how this plays out with new chips but specifically the RTX 3080 and NVDEC in Premiere. The RTX 3080 will be a complete beast with NVDEC enabled... we might actually be able to edit 4K h265 10-bit 422 files live without transcoding. Knock on wood. The price is reasonable either way, $700 for an RTX 3080, $500 for 128gb of RAM, $800 for a 5950x, plus $$$ for a motherboard/cooler or what have you. Just a bit over ~$2000 if you already have a system to drop this into and don't need a new case & psu.

    I'd love to find someone with an RTX 3080 that could report back on NVDEC implementation for their experience on the performance. Though with NVDEC it should be similar to Resolve, so perhaps someone with an RTX 3080 and resolve could shed light.


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