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    Bayer is pronounced like buyer
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    I have been saying Bayer filter wrong. It's pronounced like buyer, because that's how Bryce Bayer's name was pronounced.

    In the Wikipedia article for Bryce Bayer, you can see, "/ˈbaɪər/; pronounced BYE-er".

    Also in this video explanation of the filter, the speaker pronounces it so. At first I thought it was just his British accent or something. Then I looked it up.


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    Senior Member ahalpert's Avatar
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    Whatever. This is one of those annoying things like ISO/I S O


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    Sure, but both Houston, Texas (pronounced hoo-ston) and Houston Street in NYC (pronounced how-ston) are named after Samuel Houston, who I've heard pronounced his name "he-U-ston".

    And don't get me started on Bokeh, which is a bastardization of a Japanese word and didn't exist as an optics/photography term until the 1990s.

    If the native Italians call it "Roma" but my language seems to insist on calling it "Rome" then I don't think there are many relevant rules to the pronunciation of a type of color filter array.
    Mitch Gross
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    Senior Member paulears's Avatar
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    Ha! You guys have been mispronouncing words for over a hundred years, often to our amusement. Bayer is Germanic, so it conforms to their pronunciation rules. They have Beyer too, as in microphones. These are words that just cannot work out, just learn. Leicester, Gloucester and the shires they are in are all mangled. Shire, is of course pronounced sheer, so it's lestersheer. Lie-Chester-shire makes us roll about. We get used to how you invent new English words, that's OK. The past tense of dive, for example. We don't even have dive on use at all. We have a bird, but he dived into the water. And those weird things like one sheep and lots of sheep, you do it to words that are the same. We have lots of waterways, and we have lots of craft on them. Rivercraft are everywhere, and Christopher Cockrill invented Hovercraft, just a few miles from here where he developed them on the Norfolk Broads. He started with one hovercraft, but soon had quite a few hovercraft running up and down. Not one use of the word hovercrafts it just sounds very wrong to us Brits. We still get a bit stuck with aluminium/aluminum though. However, I mispronuncied some of your words for years till I got laughed at. Ches-ap-e-ack bay.


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    Senior Member ahalpert's Avatar
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    "two countries separated by a common language"

    Personally, I think the idea of correct pronunciation (or even spelling) is a bit useless seeing as they evolve. An interesting case is "Caesar," which - although we can't say with absolute certainty how the Romans pronounced it - was probably pronounced like the German word "kaiser." So, the English got the spelling right and the pronunciation wrong. The Germans got it the other way round. And the Russians mutated the whole thing ("czar").


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    Senior Member Liam Hall's Avatar
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    You say toe-may-toe I say ta-mar-toe. Frankly, I like the little differences in accent/pronounciation. And as a cockney, I love the use of slang. Making up words to sound intelligent while telling lies is where I draw the line, particularly when said by a person in authority standing at a lectern in front of the media.
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    Senior Member AndreeOnline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulears View Post
    Leicester, Gloucester and the shires they are in are all mangled...
    I remember the relief I felt when I learned that the correct pronunciation was "wooster-sheer" sauce. I was thinking "I'll take that and run", compared to any alternative way to read that brand name out loud.
    @andreemarkefors


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    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahalpert View Post
    Whatever. This is one of those annoying things like ISO/I S O
    It is supposed to be I S O. Just like ASA before it. It was A S A, I never heard anyone say this film is “ā-suh” 100.



    Quote Originally Posted by ahalpert View Post

    Personally, I think the idea of correct pronunciation (or even spelling) is a bit useless seeing as they evolve.
    That’s a very millennial thing to say/philosophy. Actually, it’s a very ‘society today in general’ thing to say. Don’t correct me. I’ll pronounce it however I want to(or use this saying incorrectly and then think you’re stupid, because you don’t understand what I mean, etc.).


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    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by combatentropy View Post
    I have been saying Bayer filter wrong. It's pronounced like buyer, because that's how Bryce Bayer's name was pronounced.

    In the Wikipedia article for Bryce Bayer, you can see, "/ˈbaɪər/; pronounced BYE-er".

    Also in this video explanation of the filter, the speaker pronounces it so. At first I thought it was just his British accent or something. Then I looked it up.
    Kind of like GIF. Most people have been coaxed into saying GIF with a hard G, like gift minus the T. But the inventor has been on the record as saying it is pronounced “JIF”, like the peanut butter.


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    Senior Member thekreative's Avatar
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    The one that always gets me is "buoy" which I pronounce as boy but keep hearing boo-ee , so a friend asked how they would pronounce buoyant?


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