Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 41
  1. Collapse Details
    #31
    Senior Member Tom Roper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    1,234
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by cyvideo View Post
    The way I understand it is that 24 x 12.7mm has to be the ACTIVE area of the sensor.
    Chris Young
    Yes, this.


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #32
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Jensen View Post
    If you hvae another minute, I'm curious to know more about your use of 4K 60p. When do you use it and why? Do clients request it or is it your own choice? Are you editing and delivering in 4K 60p?
    I have never had a client request 4K, and I'm lucky if they request *anything* without my asking for delivery specifics.

    The last freelance job I did (a tour of a facility for a co-working space) I would have liked to use 4K60p. I wanted 60p to slow down and smooth out shots in editing (24p timeline), and 4K would have been nice in case I needed to punch in for reframing and/or stabilization. I ended up just shooting 1080p60 on the FS5 because I didn't want the hassle and weight of my Shogun on the gimbal I was using. And it was totally fine—final delivery was for the web, so punching in a tiny bit on HD footage wasn't an issue. I just made sure to be that much more careful and deliberate in my framing while shooting. Not only was the client happy with HD, but (iirc) they were even happy enough with a 720p draft version that I sent for review that they accidentally posted it online. So yeah, no real need for me for 4K yet from a client perspective 😃

    For my regular work (filming athletes for a small sports media company) 4K60p is again nice for the option of reframing and stabilizing (which sometimes involves much more aggressive punching in depending on the shooting situation/venue). But HD 120p continuous *with* sound (which I get with the Shogun) is much more useful than 4K60p, as we do a lot of slow-motion replays in our edits. Resolve's Speed Warp does a pretty impressive job slowing down 60p footage but it takes forever to render and isn't as nice as having 120p.

    As for editing, I have never edited in a 4K timeline (that I can recall). All our work is done in HD timelines, and I've never seen a single comment about wanting 4K from our audiences.


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #33
    Senior Member Tom Roper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    1,234
    Default
    If you have to play 60p on a 24p timeline at normal speed (not slowed), you have the issue of 3:2 judder. I get a nice slowdown or a decent real-time playback without the judder by using even multiples; 24/48 or 30/60.


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #34
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Roper View Post
    If you have to play 60p on a 24p timeline at normal speed (not slowed), you have the issue of 3:2 judder. I get a nice slowdown or a decent real-time playback without the judder by using even multiples; 24/48 or 30/60.
    I'm not sure I noticed the judder in the few instances I've had 60p footage running at normal speed in a 24p timeline (but maybe because it's never been pointed out to me).

    When I edit the athlete footage we're generally in a 30p or 60p timeline so it works out (unless we're in a 50Hz country, in which case we generally shoot/edit in 50p).


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #35
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    4,927
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by drboffa View Post
    I have never had a client request 4K, and I'm lucky if they request *anything* without my asking for delivery specifics.
    Guess it just all depends on your clients. Although nowhere near the majority, I've been getting requests for 4K/UHD since at least 2015 and I'm pretty sure the first shoot I did with my F55 was "4K"(UHD 25p for a German company).


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    914
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by OnSet View Post
    Chris -
    Sounds like the other added advantage for them may have been if they wanted to examine any part of the dance technique by slowing it down in playback - where again the higher frame rate provides a better result.
    On my shoots we sometimes get requests from postproduction that certain kinds of shots be done in 60p. Just worked on a cooking show where one of the CU cameras spent most of its time at 60p simply to provide more options for the editor.
    Yes totally agree. Better slow-mo and more post options.

    Chris Young


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,452
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by drboffa View Post
    As for editing, I have never edited in a 4K timeline (that I can recall). All our work is done in HD timelines, and I've never seen a single comment about wanting 4K from our audiences.
    Thanks for the detailed reply.
    My Z750 has a new Sony codec called XAVC-L200 that is only available at 60p and 50p frame rates, and I was just curious how other poeple are already using 60p in the real world.
    XAVC-L200 is Long-GOP at only 200Mbps @ 60p -- but still 10-bit 4:2:2. I think it's going to be a great codec for productions with high shooting ratios and multiple cameras that still want to shoot in LOG or HLG.

    I don't really like the look of 60p so I've just been converting to 29.97 during grading. Looks great, though.


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #38
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Jensen View Post
    Thanks for the detailed reply.
    My Z750 has a new Sony codec called XAVC-L200 that is only available at 60p and 50p frame rates, and I was just curious how other poeple are already using 60p in the real world.
    XAVC-L200 is Long-GOP at only 200Mbps @ 60p -- but still 10-bit 4:2:2. I think it's going to be a great codec for productions with high shooting ratios and multiple cameras that still want to shoot in LOG or HLG.

    I don't really like the look of 60p so I've just been converting to 29.97 during grading. Looks great, though.
    Anytime!

    A quality Long-GOP codec would be great. I know various flavors of RAW are all the rage right now (at least from a marketing standpoint), but in like 99% of my work I'd prefer a good compromise in quality and size. Generally I'm shooting to ProRes LT when using the Shogun but I'd be happy with something of similar quality but more efficient.

    And I also don't like the look of 60p—I've slowly gotten used to it for sports related content, but it *still* takes me a few minutes to adjust every time I see a video in 60p.

    Also your video series on the FS5 was critical to getting me up to speed on my FS5 nearly three years ago! It's probably the best investment in the camera I've made.


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,452
    Default
    I'm glad you liked my FS5 master class. That is always great to hear! Thanks.


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #40
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    97
    Default
    Most of my work is event, and some local market corporate/doc type stuff. I have one big national client, and they have no issues with what I am brining back with my 4:2:0 A7III. So, for me, the FS5 adds a nice form factor, and the variable ND, which I miss on the smaller cams. I find the FS7 too big. the biggest issue, is the S35 sensor when
    I have a bag of full frame lenses.


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •