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    Achieving great catch/eye light tips?
    #1
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    Hello there guys. Im trying to start to implement catchlights in my videos using a small light on top of the camera. My question is, how do i get rid of the shadow its casting on my background. I love the look of it but i don't want the eyelight to cast shadow if possible. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.



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    Senior Member nutmegger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSFILMZ View Post
    Hello there guys. Im trying to start to implement catchlights in my videos using a small light on top of the camera. My question is, how do i get rid of the shadow its casting on my background. I love the look of it but i don't want the eyelight to cast shadow if possible. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.

    From my still photography wedding days I would have my flash mounted on the camera so it was 12” or more above the lens and pointed slightly downwards. This way it would throw the shadow down and below the subjects head if they were near a wall. There still would be catchlights in the eyes. The other option is to have your subject 6 feet or more from the background.


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    #3
    Member owlbot's Avatar
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    Just turn it down some more or diffuse it. The catchlight shouldn't be having a noticeable effect on your lighting at all. Back in the day it'd be on a stand super far away, dimmed down and diffused to hell so it'd show up as a reflection in the eye but not actually add any exposure to the scene.
    KENNY McMILLAN
    www.owlbot.co
    @_owlbot


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    #4
    Senior Member Liam Hall's Avatar
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    Yeah, turn it down a notch, or move further away from your background and light your foreground and background separately.
    www.liamhall.net
    TWITTER: @FilmLiam
    INSTAGRAM: @picsbyliam


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    #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by nutmegger View Post
    From my still photography wedding days I would have my flash mounted on the camera so it was 12 or more above the lens and pointed slightly downwards. This way it would throw the shadow down and below the subjects head if they were near a wall. There still would be catchlights in the eyes. The other option is to have your subject 6 feet or more from the background.
    Thank you i will try this one out


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    #6
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    exactly i dont want it affect my lighting at all. I will try diffusion as well. I originally didnt use diffusion since i didnt want the light to scatter. I dont have any flags to cut light out hahaha. Thanks!


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    #7
    Senior Member ahalpert's Avatar
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    If it's dim enough, you only see it in the eyes because the eyes are reflective with moisture


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    Senior Member Grug's Avatar
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    Keep the catch light to 4-5 stops under key. That'll make it basically invisible (in terms of it's impact on your subject's face) but you'll still get the reflection (if placed correctly).

    It is a very fine art.


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    #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grug View Post
    Keep the catch light to 4-5 stops under key. That'll make it basically invisible (in terms of it's impact on your subject's face) but you'll still get the reflection (if placed correctly).

    It is a very fine art.
    I blame The Punisher in Netflix, its what made me really want to get into catchlights. Some of the eyelights they have on the show was pretty hard to figure out. I decided to measure with lux, this video the catchlight was around 46 lux. Im thinking of maybe getting a bigger source since the light I used was a small LED. Thanks again guys


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    #10
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    Basically anything that John Seale ACS ASC shoots....

    The eyelight master.

    Or you can just watch Fury Road and marvel.

    JB
    Attached Images Attached Images
    John Brawley ACS
    Cinematographer
    Los Angeles
    www.johnbrawley.com
    I also have a blog


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