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    #71
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    Elizabeth Schwarzkopf.



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    #73
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    MW-FV813_BladeR_20171006122440_ZQ.jpg

    sean_young_2049_1328.jpg

    Can anyone help me understand what it is about this shot that makes it so unusual? I mainly am thinking about the background. Somehow it looks otherwordly.

    On the subject herself, I think I mostly understand it: a hard light from the left, a fill of some kind on the right (since her face is not completely dark). Feel free to comment on the foreground lighting.

    But that background, it's weird! Sure, there is some main light, from the top left, casting those shadows. But first of all, the shadows aren't black. So there must be a second light shining into the shadows from somewhere. Any idea of the angle or character of this second, background-fill light?

    Also is there some real haze in the air? Maybe that is contributing to the ethereal feel I'm getting from this photo.
    Last edited by combatentropy; 01-14-2021 at 06:26 AM.


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    #74
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    Maybe unusual because of the mixture of lighting symmetry that's creating various patterns/shapes (triangles, squares, lines) of luminosity that are mixed with a shallow DOF subject possibly shot on an anamorphic lens.


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    #76
    Senior Member paulears's Avatar
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    The blade runner scene is just very cleverly put together - the blending of lots of different elements. Absolutely real haze, but I'm also guessing there are colours here. The background is lit with hard light too, from a different direction to her shadows - in the scene the re is a huge window to the left - so that's why that side of her is so bright - In many ways it is similar to traditional German Opera - very popular over the years to have this kind of setup, but turned around. A very high high power Fresnel - we're talking about at least an old 5KW, often in later years HMI - pointing from the back wall of the stage down towards the audience, just high enough the front row don't get blinded. Then you get amazing shadows. You then fill in faces from the front, and anyone turning left or right on stage starts to look quite like the Blade Runner setup. Incidentally the theatre people consider Fresnel lenses to NOT be hard, just in between their floods, (TV/movie soft lights) and their real hard light - the ellipsoids/profiles that rarely get a look in on a movie set apart for effect.

    I see real similarities between Opera Stage and Blade Runner in look. Take her out of the scene, pop in an Egyptian King and you have Aida!


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    #77
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by combatentropy View Post
    MW-FV813_BladeR_20171006122440_ZQ.jpg

    sean_young_2049_1328.jpg

    Can anyone help me understand what it is about this shot that makes it so unusual? I mainly am thinking about the background. Somehow it looks otherwordly.

    On the subject herself, I think I mostly understand it: a hard light from the left, a fill of some kind on the right (since her face is not completely dark). Feel free to comment on the foreground lighting.

    But that background, it's weird! Sure, there is some main light, from the top left, casting those shadows. But first of all, the shadows aren't black. So there must be a second light shining into the shadows from somewhere. Any idea of the angle or character of this second, background-fill light?

    Also is there some real haze in the air? Maybe that is contributing to the ethereal feel I'm getting from this photo.
    This is exactly why Bladerunner is probably my favorite film ever produced, the amazing cinematography of Jordan Cronenworth.
    He also photographed Altered States, Peggy Sue Got Married and a ton of great music videos. I give a lot of the credit for how incredible the lighting looks
    to Ridley though, he is a pretty hands-on director with a definite vision for how he wants things to look.

    Bladerunner is a neo noir film so Cronenworth did go for a lot of harder lighting as the film noir DPs of the 40-50s did. But the look of the frame above is all about
    the synchronicity of the wardrobe, production design, music and lighting, it just sets a mood and makes everything look otherworldly. Where did you access the two
    different colored frames? The one on the top, besides the color and tone difference, is blown out and shows little detail on the lit side of Rachael's face while the same
    frame below shows pretty good detail holding on that lit side of her face?
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    #78
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    Thanks. I just searched Google Images for "blade runner".


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    #79
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    Thinking more about that publicity still that I posted, my best guess is that what is eye-catching about the background is: (1) the use of haze, and (2) a secondary, softening light source that adds complexity, in a good way. In this case, that secondary light was bounced off an underwater mirror, causing a shimmering effect on the wall, which you can't tell from the still photograph.



    The watery light is a little unnerving because it is entirely unmotivated. There are no pools of water in sight. The crew, in fact, brought this up with Ridley, but he insisted because "it looked cool", which I can't disagree with.

    When I first saw Blade Runner, I was too young to notice the craft (maybe also because it was on VHS). I just came away from it feeling down from of the unrelenting darkness and rain. Nowadays I find it extraordinarily beautiful but still can take only so much of it. The sets and lighting are just so fancy, with layer upon layer upon layer, that it's like a syrupy chocolate cake. It tastes great, but you can't live on it.

    But I love haze. I think that's why I like that shot so much. I think any shot could be improved with some haze

    But I mean haze, not fog or smoke (though those can be cool too from time to time). I like a totally uniform, subtle effect of haze throughout the room, one that a layperson would not notice. In fact I didn't know what it was I liked about certain movies for many years until I read an article about the technique. Oh, they all have haze!

    Adrian Lyne is another director from Great Britain who likes to suffocate his actors with haze. I think maybe this scene has it?



    There are those who scoff at digital diffusion effects in post, saying it's never the same as a real filter over a lens during the actual shoot. But then there is another tier who scoff at those who use glass filters, saying it's just a cheap shortcut to the real effect, which is filling the whole room with diffusion

    Ridley Scott loves not only haze but any atmospheric, any thing he can throw between the camera and subject: haze, smoke, fog, rain, snow, ash, falling leaves.

    gladiator.jpg
    Last edited by combatentropy; 01-15-2021 at 11:23 PM.


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    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    When Blade Runner came out, I had just graduated from high school and it just absolutely blew me away, I had never seen anything like it.
    I still havent. Because it's one of the last of the big budget spectacles that was made WITHOUT digital effects, it's special, just as movies
    like Pandora's Box are special because it was one of the last big impact silent films made just before the talkies spoiled everything.

    It's one of those rare films that just takes me out of the technical and into the story, atmosphere and characters. I actually
    haven't really analyzed it technically very much because watching it is just such a special experience for me. Ridley is such an amazing director
    and everything about that film and story is just magical.

    I suppose that's why I am such of fan of Lynch and Kubrick as well, their films just ooze atomosphere, they set a mood like "normal" films
    just don't and those, to me, are cinema. A lot of people say Barry Lyndon is too long and it is long but for me, it just works because of the mood
    and the epic spread of a man's life told in a way that is leisurely and slow moving, just as I imagined life during that era must have been in comparison
    to how "fast" we live today.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
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