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    #11
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    That’s easy. If you are the production and cannot afford the transportation you made a mistake in budgeting. There is no magic trick. You have to choose either expenses that must be covered or shoot with limited gear or go for a rental on site.

    ( trying to imagine a guy hiding sth under a coat on the airport makes me laugh)


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    #12
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Coughlin View Post
    Can't you just put the backpack on your front and then put a coat over it and pretend to be fat or keep it on the back and pretend to have a hunchback? At this point you've already passed security so it's not like they're going to do a body search. Perhaps hire an obese or hunchback PA to ride with you so if they decide to search you you'll have an assistant to start an outcry on fat shaming.

    The whole "bill it to the production" concept really does not apply to many shoots. What if you are the production? What if the client is paying you a flat rate? I've often dealt with flat rates for budgets when traveling for jobs, so the travel expenses are on me (this however does not mean I'm not still making a killer profit). Different productions work in different ways so it's best not to assume you can always just "bill it to the production." Every production (even Avengers) also has a limited budget, so that extra budget can go to you (such as say up-charging for a second camera) or to travel expenses. Baggage fees can quickly add up.

    Generally speaking you'll know if you're going to be flying on a small commuter plane so can prepare for that. I've never flown on one in my life, having done about 50 round trip flights in my life.

    Depends on the market segment you serve. I've never taken a flight for a shoot in almost 23 years that I couldn't expense the baggage and/or shipping fees back, if needed. Some clients even let me use their accounts to ship on, because they get a HUGE discount, so it's cheaper for them to pay for it directly than me billing it back. Not to mention shipping gear to the hotel is much easier than flying with it. Sometimes I'd ship it ahead and fly back with it, because I needed it as soon as I got back. At least I saved myself some trouble. But yes, sometimes there are productions that are, "Here's $10K for EVERYTHING. Make it work." and what's leftover is extra profit. Sometimes that's just the cost of doing business and needs to be built-in or planned for or just be ready to accept the unexpected.

    Generally speaking, you do know what equipment you're supposed to be flying on, but equipment changes happen, as do having to take other flights, because of cancellations, weather, etc. Flying sucks. I've gotten to the point that if it's a 7 to 7 1/2 hour drive or less, I won't even think twice about driving and actually prefer it. Especially if I'm traveling with gear.


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    #13
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    Eric, I know you're joking a bit as always. It's not about if the bags are visible on your body or if you can get them past the boarding agent. It's what happens once you get on the plane and to your seat. Either the stuff fits in the overhead or under the seat in front of you. If it doesn't then it has to go in the cargo hold. That simple. On some smaller planes like ones made by Bombardier or Embraer the overhead is either not big enough to fit a standard rolling suitcase (21"x9"x14") or if it is there is not room if everyone brings a bag that big. And they will not fit underneath the seat.
    So then you have the choice to give your back to go into the cargo hold or get off the plane. Do you really want to risk that situation?
    Mitch Gross
    NYC


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    #14
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    The flip side of this situation is one that I've done when traveling as small as possible. I use my clothes as the padding in a case for my gear. You can get vacuum-sealing bags to stick your clothes in and if you're smart about it can even form the bags to the shape of the gear as you pump out the air. This only works for a very small amount of gear but I have successfully padded it for stealth productions (I was going into a combat area). You can get a little hand pump to repack the vacuum bags. I've even seen ones about the size of a flashlight that run on rechargeable batteries.

    Please note that this is a VERY limited solution.
    Mitch Gross
    NYC


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    #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by New_Zealand View Post
    With air travel changing I need to change the way I pack and travel with my gear. I have one carry-on bag but need a personal bag (airlines call laptop, purse etc...) that I can place the C300 MKII and two large lens into, without it looking huge and gets tag as baggage. A shoulder type bag?
    Did I miss something? Are they changing carry on limits or something? Talking about standard commercial flights. I've always used my Kata beetle 282, well I have for 10+ years. Cameras packed: C300, EVA1, Varicam LT, Panasonic S1H, Red Epic Dragon and Helium, C300MKII. There may be one or two others.

    If I'm travelling light I also use this: http://www.kata-bags.com/lw-99-pl-rolling-organizer.htm I pack chargers anything else in there along with clothes. I basically put everything in pouches then wrap those in clothes. Can fit a lot and often get away with standard baggage fee, weight dependant. Also, underwear and socks usually end up in my tripod case haha

    Look I know we budget to cover these costs, but my clients always appreciate if Im a little inventive to keep those down.
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    #16
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    I’ve flown a lot over the last 20 years and during the last five or so I’ve noticed airlines around the globe getting a lot stricter about carry-ons. I have had hand baggage weighed before international flights at Narita, Haneda and Sendai (Japan), Charles De Gaulle, Frankfurt, Dusseldorf, Copenhagen, Seattle-Tacoma, Heathrow, O’Hare, JFK, LA, and a few others. Doesn’t seem to make much difference which airline either. Sometimes I go sailing through without a hitch but I just accept now that I have to be within the limits or some “jobsworth” is going to enjoy his/her role and follow the rules exactly no matter how sweetly I smile.
    Worst one was at Narita. I was using a Canon C300/2 with a few lenses and it just fitted in my LowePro backpack. Tried to be smart and carried it while I queued to make it look light but the check-in lady weighed it and obviously it was well over the 7kg limit. I transferred as much as I could to my two suitcases but it still came in at 8kg. The smiling worked and they let me on but it was touch and go whether that C300 took its life in its hands in the hold. Fortunately the cases made it without being “lost” but it could have cost me dear. I hope YMMV.


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    #17
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
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    figure ot how to get a media pass. Will save you a lot on check in fees. And will be safer for everyone if there aren't 100lbs carry-ons in the overhead.

    That said, I usually have a lightly back soft carry on that is actually slightly larger than the average carry-on. That way if I run into over weight issues, I can quickly put a few extra pounds into my carry-on.

    But if you are traveling with cine zooms and pro video bodies, can get real tricky trying to go as a civilian. Definitely get a media pass. talk to the companies you have worked for and they may be able to help with that.

    Airlines need to address the freelancer though, they primarily only recognize media that are on staff, which is ridiculous in todays media landscape. At least one person I know freelances for some big networks, and he has had to make his own media badge because of how poor the airlines have their media credentials system set up. I can't think if anyone that travels with broadcast gear for fun, just to save money on check ins for said gear. Just doesn't really happen.


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    #18
    Senior Member New_Zealand's Avatar
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    It not the cost of baggage but the lost of baggage that has me worried.


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    #19
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    Most crews working in the United States have easy access to FedEx and UPS locations where thousands of dollars of rented equipment is waiting usually close by the production location(s). Even if filming will be taking place deep in the woods or mountains over here, you can most likely still find one 1-2-3 hours away. And if companies aren't renting, they are usually driving everything over in huge trucks. (Big budgets/projects.)

    Although I think I remember you saying you work in many remote locations so you may be in a compromised situation regardless, and have no choice but to pack what you really need and pay and hope for the best.


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    #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    figure ot how to get a media pass. Will save you a lot on check in fees. And will be safer for everyone if there aren't 100lbs carry-ons in the overhead.

    That said, I usually have a lightly back soft carry on that is actually slightly larger than the average carry-on. That way if I run into over weight issues, I can quickly put a few extra pounds into my carry-on.

    But if you are traveling with cine zooms and pro video bodies, can get real tricky trying to go as a civilian. Definitely get a media pass. talk to the companies you have worked for and they may be able to help with that.

    Airlines need to address the freelancer though, they primarily only recognize media that are on staff, which is ridiculous in todays media landscape. At least one person I know freelances for some big networks, and he has had to make his own media badge because of how poor the airlines have their media credentials system set up. I can't think if anyone that travels with broadcast gear for fun, just to save money on check ins for said gear. Just doesn't really happen.
    It's pretty trivial to make your own media pass from your own company.

    I've only been hassled trying to get media bags on a plane once using just a business card... and they eventually relented. After that, I paid like $25 and had three media passes made. Never had an issue since.
    JERBCO, LLC
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