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    cases for air travel
    #1
    Senior Member New_Zealand's Avatar
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    With air travel changing I need to change the way I pack and travel with my gear. I have one carry-on bag but need a personal bag (airlines call laptop, purse etc...) that I can place the C300 MKII and two large lens into, without it looking huge and gets tag as baggage. A shoulder type bag?


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    I travel for several years with two think tank airport accelerator. I use it for all kind of equipment including EVA1 with the 18-80 and additional gear. It hits exactly cabin luggage size. I had to run a proof on a small Bombardier. I recommend also the non roller version as it saves almost 5lb. It’s rock solid it protectsyour precious stuff. I hadn’t had a single issue in about 6 yrs. My assistant even “forgot” it in the field when it started to rain. Everything was safe after an hour. I rate it 6 out of 5 stars.

    --
    sorry I read your post again. It seems you already have a backpack.
    I don't think that there is shoulder bag which is big enough for a C300 that isn't considered as cabin luggage. Worst case in this scenario that the airline forces you to check in one bag as cargo. I would not run that risk and avoid this by all means.
    Last edited by Clermond; 05-30-2020 at 08:32 AM. Reason: reasons


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    #3
    Senior Member New_Zealand's Avatar
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    It a bit stressful trying to figure out the best way to get from point A to B.


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    Senior Member Eric Coughlin's Avatar
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    One thing I've done with air travel when trying to pack as much as possible without paying baggage fees (so one 60 lb carry on and a 30 lb personal bag (backpack)) is to use a regular suitcase and backpack for my luggage as opposed to video ones. Of course video ones cost more, are better padded, etc., but on the downside, their extra padding means there's less room for equipment. So if you're handling the items yourself then you don't really need that bullet-proof padding as much and can then pack more stuff in it. In the suit case I mostly put metal objects, lights, Glidecam, tripod, light stands, etc., so nothing fragile (which helps in the event you have to check the carry-on), and then camera, lenses, and audio in the backpack.


    Quote Originally Posted by New_Zealand View Post
    It a bit stressful trying to figure out the best way to get from point A to B.
    Really? My parents taught me the alphabet back when I was a little kid and I never considered it stressful. Nowadays I can get all the way to "Z" without breaking a sweat.


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    I pretty much do what Eric recommends.

    In my experience, you will rarely ever get checked with a backpack on your shoulders, so I started to purchase thin and large backpacks. And if you needed a better padded one, I'd use one that had a separate pouch for a laptop and cut it out to have a little more room.

    Also - out of the hundreds of things I have sold in my life, this discontinued Tenba bag has somehow lasted with me for 7 years and still looks great. I took out the cardboard sides so it stretches like a thin backpack for those times I need a little more space.

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...Case_CC15.html

    With a carry-on, you always have to compromise between size, gear, and amount of protection.


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    I will warn you that far too many times I have been on small commuter planes where all luggage has to be placed in cargo. Sometimes this can include backpacks if they deem the flight to overcrowded. Anything larger than a laptop bag might get sent to cargo, which could destroy a lightly-padded camera kit. There are times it's better to pay the excess baggage fee and charge it to the production. Simply make it part of your deal from the outset: production pays for for gear transpo. Not worth it to risk.
    Mitch Gross
    NYC


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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Gross View Post
    I will warn you that far too many times I have been on small commuter planes where all luggage has to be placed in cargo. Sometimes this can include backpacks if they deem the flight to overcrowded. Anything larger than a laptop bag might get sent to cargo, which could destroy a lightly-padded camera kit. There are times it's better to pay the excess baggage fee and charge it to the production. Simply make it part of your deal from the outset: production pays for for gear transpo. Not worth it to risk.
    I agree absolutely. My cabin luggage was been weighed in the last years more and more often as well as checkin and also rarely when boarding. One trick to avoid it is to have the backpack on your back but it isn't a guarantee that they don't. I case they try to get your cabin luggage to cargo tell them that it's not possible because of all the batteries
    but there is no guarantee either.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Gross View Post
    I will warn you that far too many times I have been on small commuter planes where all luggage has to be placed in cargo. Sometimes this can include backpacks if they deem the flight to overcrowded. Anything larger than a laptop bag might get sent to cargo, which could destroy a lightly-padded camera kit. There are times it's better to pay the excess baggage fee and charge it to the production. Simply make it part of your deal from the outset: production pays for for gear transpo. Not worth it to risk.
    Agreed.

    I’ve traveled with the fitted Jason Case’s C300ii case. My “personal” is a small camera bag with my lenses, lav mic, laptop, portable SSDs, etc.

    I used to use a roll on think tank and it was put under the plane on a trip from Vancouver to Seattle. The wheel was broken when I got it back. Camera bags just can’t take any sort of beating and you’re hosed if there’s no room.

    You can however always pay for priority seating to get seated quicker and ensure you have overhead cargo space. I’ve also noticed that holding a camera case, rather than wheeling it, helps your chances of them not flagging it at gate check in. The trick is to make the case look as small and light as possible.

    Are you trying to get around checking anything? I’d assume you’d need to check a small suitcase with clothing etc.


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    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    It can be a dangerous game. I’ve been put on some smaller jets that I could barely fit the naked camera in the overhead and it still involved weird angles, twisting and some light praying. I would have paid money to have a picture of the young flight attendants face as she was closing the bins on that one early morning flight when she saw my F55 in there. It was priceless. The mix of quizzical, surprise and I wanna say almost ‘wonder’, like when a kid discovers something for the first time.


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    Senior Member Eric Coughlin's Avatar
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    Can't you just put the backpack on your front and then put a coat over it and pretend to be fat or keep it on the back and pretend to have a hunchback? At this point you've already passed security so it's not like they're going to do a body search. Perhaps hire an obese or hunchback PA to ride with you so if they decide to search you you'll have an assistant to start an outcry on fat shaming.

    The whole "bill it to the production" concept really does not apply to many shoots. What if you are the production? What if the client is paying you a flat rate? I've often dealt with flat rates for budgets when traveling for jobs, so the travel expenses are on me (this however does not mean I'm not still making a killer profit). Different productions work in different ways so it's best not to assume you can always just "bill it to the production." Every production (even Avengers) also has a limited budget, so that extra budget can go to you (such as say up-charging for a second camera) or to travel expenses. Baggage fees can quickly add up.

    Generally speaking you'll know if you're going to be flying on a small commuter plane so can prepare for that. I've never flown on one in my life, having done about 50 round trip flights in my life.


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