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    Zoom H1N with Rode Videomicro / Blue Yeti?
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    Hi guys,

    I currently use a Zoom H1N for my Zoom meetings / podcasts. Was just wondering:

    1. How much will SQ improve if I add on the VideoMicro to my H1N?
    2. How will this Combination compare against the Blue Yeti, and why is the Yeti so popular?
    3. Any alternative to recommend for the BEST (clear-sounding) sound quality under $300?
    4. If I'm connecting the VideoMicro DIRECT to PC, how do I monitor and adjust the input levels?

    Thanks in advance for your help!


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    1. A decent amount, but you'll have to talk right into it, inches away. (Although there are much better microphones for just a little more money.)

    Don't you get a lot of popping with the built-in H1N microphones?

    2. Because it's cheap and a good microphone for the price. And it's also a YouTube icon that has had many years of recommendations.

    3. Keep recording into the recorder, but just get a better microphone like a NTG2 (or something more dedicated for podcasts or dialogue). Or something for a bit more money that sounds really good like the Shure SM7B. There are a variety of options.

    4. You'll need some kind of interface in-between to do it manually with your hands (or software on the computer).


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    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    1. A decent amount, but you'll have to talk right into it, inches away. (Although there are much better microphones for just a little more money.)

    Don't you get a lot of popping with the built-in H1N microphones?

    2. Because it's cheap and a good microphone for the price. And it's also a YouTube icon that has had many years of recommendations.

    3. Keep recording into the recorder, but just get a better microphone like a NTG2 (or something more dedicated for podcasts or dialogue). Or something for a bit more money that sounds really good like the Shure SM7B. There are a variety of options.

    4. You'll need some kind of interface in-between to do it manually with your hands (or software on the computer).
    Thanks for the prompt response!

    1. Do you mind sharing some examples of "better mics for just a little more $"? and better in what sense?

    I was thinking of the Videomic NTG but after checking out some youtube videos, I couldn't tell much difference between the two, other than the much lower noise floor of the NTG. Must we have very good speakers to hear the difference?

    3. The SM7B is 5x more expensive than the VideoMicro.. 😅

    4. What's the best software for it? Don't mind paying for a good one.


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    P.S. The reason I'm recommending a better shotgun is because it may also be a better investment for you (since you asked about the VideoMicro).

    For me, personally...anytime I would have to record VOs - or do some other similar audio work - I would use the shotgun I had at the time because no one would ever notice a difference for my level of work, and I could also use the same microphone for general video production vs. only being able to use a more traditional studio mic (that's better for podcasts) for close recording while sitting down.

    And better for me sounds richer. You can manipulate a lot in post these days, but a better microphone usually sounds fuller if you will, has some bass to it. Not cheap and thin.

    If you think the VideoMicro sounds pretty good, you'd probably love the NTG2 in post #5. For the price, it's one of the most popular microphones in audio history (and the NTG3). Sennheiser also has the MKE 600, which I love.


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    One more possibility for you...adding a preamp for the VideoMicro (if you do go with that one).

    [Coincidentally, I just put up the Beachtek for sale today (that's not why I'm showing you).]

    Rudimentary stuff here, but this is my old audio set-up that sounded just as good as much more expensive ones. It enabled me to keep the levels in the H1 around 40-45 and pump it with clean gain from the DXA-MICRO-PRO. The microphone was the Audio-Technica AT875R.

    Besides the Zoom (and cables and batteries), here are the other two:

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...r_Shotgun.html

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...r_compact.html

    Simple Audio Setup.jpg


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    Quote Originally Posted by dylansmith View Post
    Hi guys,

    I currently use a Zoom H1N for my Zoom meetings / podcasts. Was just wondering:

    1. How much will SQ improve if I add on the VideoMicro to my H1N?
    2. How will this Combination compare against the Blue Yeti, and why is the Yeti so popular?
    3. Any alternative to recommend for the BEST (clear-sounding) sound quality under $300?
    4. If I'm connecting the VideoMicro DIRECT to PC, how do I monitor and adjust the input levels?

    Thanks in advance for your help!

    1. Not very much. It will be mono instead of stereo as you hopefully know, but maybe there will be some ergonomic improvements because the VideoMicro may be easier to position and monitor (assuming you monitored levels on the H1n screen previously). Zoom meetings has pretty basic sound quality in the first place, so I doubt anything will give noticeable improvements over the build in mics of the H1n. Placement is probably more important.
    2. Have not tried it.
    3. Can't be answered. It depends on the sound treatment of your room and what kind of preamps you have available etc.
    4. The VideoMicro comes with a short TRS cable. If you have TRS mic input on your PC and if the PC provides Plug in power (required by VideoMicro), you can just plug it in and control microphone levels from Settings in Zoom, or your audio software.
    You can alternatively use your H1n as an audio interface by connecting the VideoMicro to the Mic in jack and connecting the H1n to your PC via USB. Using the H1n as audio interface may well provide better sound than connecting the microphone directly.
    Last edited by NielsN; 05-30-2020 at 06:48 AM.


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    Most audio software can do the job. Sound Forge is an audio editing app and has been around since the 90's, The current version, Sound Forge-14 includes iZotope's RX Elements audio restoration tools as well as EQs, dynamics processors and effects plug-ins. Surgical editing, redrawing the waveform and such be done down to the sample level. SF is a multi-channel editing app and work with up to 32 channels. It also can author and burn CDs (whatever that is).
    btw, Multi-channel is not to be confused with multi-track, which is usually associated with music productions. PTs Audition, Audacity, ect., are multi-track applications. I have been a Sound Forge Pro user since version 3.
    In any case always record and save files in the PCM format. If an end-user MP3 is needed, that can be encoded from the PCM master. Most PCM files use the <.wav> or sometimes the <.aif> extension in the Mac world.


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    OK a few other things to chew on regarding mic choices since you might be willing to pay a bit for some improvements:

    Would you prefer to have the mic hidden?
    If so, you might consider a lavaliere type mic. A decent one would pair well with your H1n and also could allow you some freedom of movement.
    Another way to hide your mic is to use a stand with a boom to position your mic. Using a stand with boom can help get your mic in a good position but out of screen. Mic position is at least as important as mic quality. Options would open up such as shotguns and small cardioids.

    If you just want to get a modestly priced mic on a gooseneck stand in front of you, you might consider a SM57 for $100 + a $20 desk mount. It's good enough for presidential speeches.
    If you want a modestly priced versatile shotgun, you might consider a AT-875 for $170. A very versatile mic that hits above its weight.
    There are loads of economy large diaphragm condenser types which sound great if you don't mind a larger mic.
    There are loads of economy small diaphragm condensers which sound great if you want compact. Ditto for lavs.

    Any of these choices would be a nice improvement over the VideoMicro which I have, along with the others I mentioned. IMHO, a tin can with string would be better that a VM. The VM is really something you hang on top of a DSLR to improve the built in camera sound somewhat and have the option to add a fuzzy for wind protection. But again, I would make my choice on your room and circumstances. There are plenty of threads here and or on Y-Tube regarding mic choices. Mic choice maybe somewhat dependent on the strength of the pre-amps in your recorder. I don't own one, but the small "older" Zooms aren't known for having strong pre-amps. Weak output mic + weak pre-amps is as bad combo regardless of mic quality.

    G


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    Quote Originally Posted by ggrantly View Post
    OK a few other things to chew on regarding mic choices since you might be willing to pay a bit for some improvements:

    Would you prefer to have the mic hidden?
    If so, you might consider a lavaliere type mic. A decent one would pair well with your H1n and also could allow you some freedom of movement.
    Another way to hide your mic is to use a stand with a boom to position your mic. Using a stand with boom can help get your mic in a good position but out of screen. Mic position is at least as important as mic quality. Options would open up such as shotguns and small cardioids.

    If you just want to get a modestly priced mic on a gooseneck stand in front of you, you might consider a SM57 for $100 + a $20 desk mount. It's good enough for presidential speeches.
    If you want a modestly priced versatile shotgun, you might consider a AT-875 for $170. A very versatile mic that hits above its weight.
    There are loads of economy large diaphragm condenser types which sound great if you don't mind a larger mic.
    There are loads of economy small diaphragm condensers which sound great if you want compact. Ditto for lavs.

    Any of these choices would be a nice improvement over the VideoMicro which I have, along with the others I mentioned. IMHO, a tin can with string would be better that a VM. The VM is really something you hang on top of a DSLR to improve the built in camera sound somewhat and have the option to add a fuzzy for wind protection. But again, I would make my choice on your room and circumstances. There are plenty of threads here and or on Y-Tube regarding mic choices. Mic choice maybe somewhat dependent on the strength of the pre-amps in your recorder. I don't own one, but the small "older" Zooms aren't known for having strong pre-amps. Weak output mic + weak pre-amps is as bad combo regardless of mic quality.

    G
    Will you consider the H1N having a weak pre-amp?

    Also, is it true that dynamic mics (such as the SM57) can last a lifetime since there are no "electronics" in it? I don't mind a big one since it will most often be used for Zoom meetings, recording my voice for tutorials etc. Will also prefer one with maximum rejection and narrow sound field which is super durable, as my frequency of usage is very low (maybe 3x a month).


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    Quote Originally Posted by NielsN View Post
    4. The VideoMicro comes with a short TRS cable. If you have TRS mic input on your PC and if the PC provides Plug in power (required by VideoMicro), you can just plug it in and control microphone levels from Settings in Zoom, or your audio software.
    You can alternatively use your H1n as an audio interface by connecting the VideoMicro to the Mic in jack and connecting the H1n to your PC via USB. Using the H1n as audio interface may well provide better sound than connecting the microphone directly.
    ah! How do I check whether my PC provides plug-in power? My motherboard is MSI Z170A Gaming M5, as well as a B450 Tomahawk Max.

    Separately, does anyone know where I can get a long (preferably >1.5-2M) TRS to TRRS cable? Tried using an adapter + extension previously but it drastically reduces the input levels. No idea why..


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