Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. Collapse Details
    #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    7,490
    Default
    The H1N has a very weak preamp. That's why you need gain to lower the noise floor ("hiss").

    When you do that and also lower your level inside the H1N to 35-45, you have immediately improved your audio quality. The microphone choice then becomes less important (for your particular purpose) as 99% of people wouldn't notice a difference anyway.


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Washington, the state.
    Posts
    3,649
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by dylansmith View Post
    Will you consider the H1N having a weak pre-amp?

    Also, is it true that dynamic mics (such as the SM57) can last a lifetime since there are no "electronics" in it? I don't mind a big one since it will most often be used for Zoom meetings, recording my voice for tutorials etc. Will also prefer one with maximum rejection and narrow sound field which is super durable, as my frequency of usage is very low (maybe 3x a month).
    Most any decent quality mic previously mentioned will be plenty durable for your needs, especially what might be considered location mics like lavs, small condensers and shotguns. Large condensers while sounding great, are less rugged and would be a poor choice for anything where the mic might be moving. For sure, there are mics that are considered extremely durable and the Share dynamics like the SM57 and 58 are amongst them, but I wouldn't give this top priority unless you are abusing things.

    You will get much better mic suggestions if you describe the acoustics of you recording space, do you ever record in the field using a video cam? No one mic is best for everything, some are one trick ponies, and others are more versatile. For example, while shotguns are directional and can help exclude noise from the side, they are generally a poor choice for interiors that are untreated acoustically. Much better to go with a small condenser or a dynamic for that type of room. Dynamics are good for rejection at the cost of needing very close placement, so will of necessity be in screen usually. And, I will repeat this, placement of your mic is the MOST important thing of all. It mitigates weak preamps and helps to reduce background noise. The best mics on Earth don't sound good when poorly placed.

    G
    Last edited by ggrantly; 06-02-2020 at 12:01 PM.


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    142
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by ggrantly View Post
    Most any decent quality mic previously mentioned will be plenty durable for your needs, especially what might be considered location mics like lavs, small condensers and shotguns. Large condensers while sounding great, are less rugged and would be a poor choice for anything where the mic might be moving. For sure, there are mics that are considered extremely durable and the Share dynamics like the SM57 and 58 are amongst them, but I wouldn't give this top priority unless you are abusing things.

    You will get much better mic suggestions if you describe the acoustics of you recording space, do you ever record in the field using a video cam? No one mic is best for everything, some are one trick ponies, and others are more versatile. For example, while shotguns are directional and can help exclude noise from the side, they are generally a poor choice for interiors that are untreated acoustically. Much better to go with a small condenser or a dynamic for that type of room. Dynamics are good for rejection at the cost of needing very close placement, so will of necessity be in screen usually. And, I will repeat this, placement of your mic is the MOST important thing of all. It mitigates weak preamps and helps to reduce background noise. The best mics on Earth don't sound good when poorly placed.

    G
    Hello,

    This mic will be stationary in an untreated room, with occasional traffic/rail noise outdoors and me talking directly into mic 6" away. is there an "all-in-one" solution that doesn't require pre-amp, low noise floor, won't distort easily?

    What would be an E.g. of a large condenser?


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Washington, the state.
    Posts
    3,649
    Default
    I'm sure some of the really experienced sound guys might chime in here as well.

    If you have an untreated room that has a lot of reverberation, then avoid most shotguns.

    If you have off axis noise you can't control, then a hyper or super cardioid pattern will help.

    A small diaphragm condenser (SDC) type in a tight pattern would work well. They require phantom power, so are usually a little hotter than a dynamic so will help reduce preamp load. There are many under $100. Good ones are a lot more, but decent quality has arrived in economy micing.

    A dynamic like a SM57, or better if you can afford it, an ElectroVoice RE20 would be particularly good, though large. Both will give you good isolation if properly placed. Since dynamics aren't phantom powered, they tend to be not as hot, so your preamp situation may preclude this choice.

    There are probably a bunch of other selection reasons, but there is a start.

    Edit: I might ad that doing some room treatment will be some of the best audio investment you can make. Carpet, drapes, book cases, furniture all help. Surrounding yourself with furniture pads is really effective. This is one of those easy to do things that can have a huge impact.
    Last edited by ggrantly; 06-11-2020 at 12:51 AM.


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    142
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by ggrantly View Post
    I'm sure some of the really experienced sound guys might chime in here as well.

    If you have an untreated room that has a lot of reverberation, then avoid most shotguns.

    If you have off axis noise you can't control, then a hyper or super cardioid pattern will help.

    A small diaphragm condenser (SDC) type in a tight pattern would work well. They require phantom power, so are usually a little hotter than a dynamic so will help reduce preamp load. There are many under $100. Good ones are a lot more, but decent quality has arrived in economy micing.

    A dynamic like a SM57, or better if you can afford it, an ElectroVoice RE20 would be particularly good, though large. Both will give you good isolation if properly placed. Since dynamics aren't phantom powered, they tend to be not as hot, so your preamp situation may preclude this choice.

    There are probably a bunch of other selection reasons, but there is a start.

    Edit: I might ad that doing some room treatment will be some of the best audio investment you can make. Carpet, drapes, book cases, furniture all help. Surrounding yourself with furniture pads is really effective. This is one of those easy to do things that can have a huge impact.
    I have learned so much from this one post alone!

    Please pardon me but I have some newbie questions on audio -

    is a DAC different from a pre-amp? I am looking for a decent USB DAC to improve my PC speakers audio quality. Will it also help if my mic is connected via the USB DAC? Quite a few recommended the Topping D10 or Fulla 3, but doesn't look like there's a mic input. Which affordable & inconspicuous USB DAC/pre-amp under $100 will you recommend?

    Also, I checked out the SM57 and looks like it needs a XLR input, which means I'll need another "relay box" right? Is there any dynamic which doesn't require that? E.g. direct USB-c connection? trying to minimize the amount of equipment I need to connect & switch on every time I need it..


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Washington, the state.
    Posts
    3,649
    Default
    I don't deal with any of the stuff you mentioned; is some of it gaming gear? Gaming gear might serve you if carefully chosen, but for the most part, pro audio folks stay away from it. There are plenty of USB direct input mics, but most pros don't use them either. So if you want to record audio direct to computer using more professional mics, most people would use an audio interface of which there are plenty. Pricing starts around $100 depending on the quality of the preamps, number of inputs, and the interface itself such as USB, Firewaire, or Thunderbolt. I don't know the bottom end of the market but hear folks praise Focusrite as good for the money. Solid State Logic has a new economy interface which is highly regarded as well. I have had a Motu interface for some time which is also good. Any of the interfaces I mentioned will have XLR type inputs and have switchable 48v phantom power available for condenser type mics.

    Another great AI choice would be a Sound Devices MixPre-D. This is a small professional quality field mixer that has a USB interface. It has outstanding preamps which can handle any mic you will ever use; we're talking studio quality in a really small package. Used ones are coming down in price and might be in your budget. Make sure you are looking at the "D" version as the original didn't have the USB digital output.

    Any of the devices I've mentioned will be a stand alone solution. Plug in mic of your choice and plug into computer, add software and you are good to go.

    And virtually any mic worth anything will have XLR connections. Your VidepMicro has 1/8 plug and anything like that is pretty much consumer junk with the exception of some lavalieres intended for wireless.

    Some interfaces can handle your monitor output as well, my Motu Traveler does that via firewire, but I think most people use a separate controller or mixer to handle output. There are sound cards available with breakout cables. You could then use an economy gig mixer like a small Mackie. I did that for quite a while. Trying to control your monitors directly from your CPU will be a frustration. In my workstation, I use a Presonus controller which has input flexibility, output flexibility, headphone outputs, and a lot more. I think they are about $300. They go up from there. I don't know much about the PC world but using either usb or optical output would be very preferable to using any 1/8 plug output from your CPU. Again, not very familiar with PC sound cards or outputs.


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    142
    Default
    hmm getting confused here. Using the example you gave (E.g. https://focusrite.com/en/usb-audio-i.../scarlett-solo), I'm buying this purely so that I can use dynamic mics like the SM57 right? What If I bought the VideoMic NTG instead? How different will it be if I plugged the NTG direct to PC vs SM57 ► FocusRite ► PC?

    Also, I notice the interface doesn't have optical. Is there one that has it, so that I can connect my SWAN monitors to it and improve the SQ?


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Washington, the state.
    Posts
    3,649
    Default
    "I'm buying this purely so that I can use dynamic mics like the SM57 right? "

    Yes, and also if you choose a mic that needs phantom power. Most AI devices have multiple mic preamps-inputs if that matters.

    "What If I bought the VideoMic NTG instead?"

    You can do that. It might sound great. It might not; I haven't a clue. Most USB mics are in the economy class, so not widely used professionally except for blogging or similar uses. That is you, so might be fine.

    "How different will it be if I plugged the NTG direct to PC vs SM57 ► FocusRite ► PC? "

    Mics by nature are analogue and that needs to be converted to digital before it gets to your computer. You can do it with an interface device or within the mic. Not very many pros are going to use a USB mic since it is a one trick pony. Most video is recorded in the field and loaded into an editing workstation from some type of portable memory. My point is, probably not many users here will be familiar with the comparison you ask about. I suspect that even an economy classed AI will have better preamps than the internal one in a USB mic.

    "Also, I notice the interface doesn't have optical. Is there one that has it, so that I can connect my SWAN monitors to it and improve the SQ?"

    Optical and thunderbolt are options arrive on more expensive gear than your original budget. On my mac, I have used USB, optical, firewire and thunderbolt, and to tell the truth, didn't notice much if any difference in audio output quality. Your audio quality will be more dependent on the capability of your CPU or sound card. The interface type isn't as important IMHO.

    A basic AI and a SM57 will put you miles ahead of where you are for well under your budget. And if you decide to improve your kit later, you can add any mic of your choice to a decent AI.

    Grant
    Last edited by ggrantly; 06-13-2020 at 02:06 AM.


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •