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    Help with Sony a7s Slog2 + Gamut
    #1
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    May 2016
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    Hello there!
    So let me get straight to business. I started a project using Slog2+Gamut and had one of the main scenes shoot with that profile, it turned out pretty noisy because of the lack of lighting and 100fps. but the scene is done and I cant redo it. So my question is: which profile to use for the rest of the film that's the closest to Slog2 but handles better in low light? Any recommendations would be appreciated


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    #2
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    Feb 2009
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    Any of the other picture profiles handle low-light better because they are already crushing your blacks and essentially color grading your footage for you, but you'd be losing dynamic range.

    The real answer is you should be adding more light.

    But if you really can't then you'll have to live with the noise in S-Log1/2 or use one of the other profiles. There are cine gammas which try to balance both, DR and color. Experiment with all of the various numbers (PP1, PP2, etc.) and check out the footage on your computer before shooting your project again. The cine gammas would be the closest to S-Log2 (but there are also various settings you can tweak if you wanted to depending on your environment).

    Also, 100fps did indeed make your footage noisier, but not only because of your light dropping because of the higher framerate but also because it's 1080p (assuming you're on the a7SII) and its processing is terrible. Low-quality 100fps. If you're on the original a7S then it's only 720p and even worse.

    Shooting 4K to an external recorder at 24fps will provide you better-looking low-light footage.


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    #3
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    Oct 2009
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    Experiment with Cine2 and Cine4 and the ETTR (exposing to the right) exposure technique.


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