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    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Coughlin View Post
    If only Arri offered a 720p mode to meet YouTube's initial playback resolution without the need to downscale in post they'd have a real winner of a camera. But I know, I know, Arri doesn't play the resolution game so we're stuck with 2K, 3.2K, 4K, 4.5K, and 6K.

    I recall the first wedding I filmed I was worried that my computer would not handle 1080, so I set the HVX200 and Canon XH-A1 I had access to to 480, but I was also borrowing an HMC40 which I had assumed would do 480p as well, but upon getting my hands on it at the wedding, I discovered 720p was the lowest resolution it could do. Needless to say, it required a lot of extra time and effort in post (borrowing someone else's computer) to convert all that footage to 480p so I could edit it on my computer.
    Well said. +1


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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Coughlin View Post
    If only Arri offered a 720p mode to meet YouTube's initial playback resolution without the need to downscale in post they'd have a real winner of a camera. But I know, I know, Arri doesn't play the resolution game so we're stuck with 2K, 3.2K, 4K, 4.5K, and 6K.

    I recall the first wedding I filmed I was worried that my computer would not handle 1080, so I set the HVX200 and Canon XH-A1 I had access to to 480, but I was also borrowing an HMC40 which I had assumed would do 480p as well, but upon getting my hands on it at the wedding, I discovered 720p was the lowest resolution it could do. Needless to say, it required a lot of extra time and effort in post (borrowing someone else's computer) to convert all that footage to 480p so I could edit it on my computer.
    You should try to write more scripts (maybe you do, IDK).

    I know you love the camera (etc/etc), but I think your future is in writing.

    And that doesn't mean I'm fond of all of your jokes; just that I have read you analyze everyday situations uniquely [and bizarrely] for years, and that talent might actually really work for someone out there looking for certain material.


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    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    You should try to write more scripts (maybe you do, IDK).

    I know you love the camera (etc/etc), but I think your future is in writing.

    And that doesn't mean I'm fond of all of your jokes; just that I have read you analyze everyday situations uniquely [and bizarrely] for years, and that talent might actually really work for someone out there looking for certain material.
    As someone who has worked with the Homeland, 24, Family Guy and Simpsons writing staffs for years, there is soooooo much more money to be made in writing over being a camera monkey.
    But I will say that an extraordinary amount of the writers for those shows all attended the same Ivy Leagues. I have seen very few "outsiders" but it's not impossible. Also, stand up. If Eric could
    transition to stand up and have some success, that would make him a contender. Seriously. About half the Family Guy writers came from stand up.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    Totally agree. Although stand-up is more difficult because so much relies in your personality, delivery, even your looks for some people. You have to have an effect on people.

    With writing, you could create roles for hundreds of others. Or create shows. Scenes. Commercials. Films. YouTube videos. So much opportunity.

    The only X-factor being - like with most things in life - who's going to pay, who's going to be interested.


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    So nice of everyone to stage this intervention for Eric since he's obviously so unhappy in his thankless dead-end cameraman job lol jk

    But you could write if you're interested, as long as you can afford a pen with enough dynamic range


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    Thankless job with a couple of AMIRAs and maybe some C300s nonetheless!


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    My free career advice to Eric - I'll accept a gratuity - is to do what he's doing with shorts but become more of a writer-director-cinematographer of his pieces (if he can swing the budget). The streaming universe has unlimited bandwidth and server space and, to quote Bill Gates, "content is king".


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    Quote Originally Posted by ahalpert View Post
    But you could write if you're interested, as long as you can afford a pen with enough dynamic range
    I wandered over to a writer's forum, but all they wanted to talk about was ink viscosity and paper weight.


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    Senior Member Eric Coughlin's Avatar
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    I've written 16 scripts which I've made into short films, and probably another around 50 scripts that haven't been made. I wrote one feature which I made for my senior thesis film in college. So, perhaps five scripts per year for the past 12 years. I've been writing a lot more lately, around 12 short scripts in the past year and perhaps another dozen fleshed out script ideas that were never fully put to paper. When I was unemployed for awhile after graduating college during the 2009 recession, I sort of became a "writer," which was a euphemism for unemployed. Like directing making income off of script-writing is not easy, probably even more difficult than making money directing.

    I am writing, producing, directing, and DPing my shorts; I'm just not monetizing them since they're shorts and shorts don't typically make money. So, they're a building ground for growing reel and experience. Perhaps I'll produce a feature not too far into the future and try to monetize it. Unfortunately at the low end, $50k budget features rarely make good profits and more often lose money. But, they also work as building grounds to bigger ones.

    But I'll let my State Farm rep know now that I am definitely not interested in the disability insurance they want to sell me, as if I become physically handicapped I can just become a writer then (and if I'm mentally handicapped my parents will take me back). Better than editing, as I don't enjoy editing much. I enjoy camera work and producing more than writing, but writing can be fun.

    Watching Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and Louie C.K., neither of those shows really make a stand-up career look appealing, even if you succeed. Start out doing pay to play, slowly building up, and if you're successful you're traveling so much good luck having a legit family life. I hadn't realized until season three that David Mullen who has posted a lot on RedUser was the DP for Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.

    Another show I'm currently watching showing stand-up, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia; spoilers ahead for this episode in season eight or nine, so the character Sweet Dee gets into stand-up, her friends cheer her on, the crowds love her, she gets an agent, then another better agent, gets booked on Conan, takes a private jet out to be on the show in L.A., arrives on set, the curtain is pulled back to perform for Conan, only to find out the jet and limo took her back to the same bar her friends run in Philadelphia, and they had set everything up as an elaborate prank, hiring extras for the crowd to pretend she was good at stand-up, hiring the private jet, the fake agents, etc. The joke was on her.

    So, you never really know with stand-up if you're actually successful or not. That said, there's always acting, since I'm a bleeping actor now too.

    In any case, camerawork is currently (aside from pandemic slow down) easy money and fun.

    I haven't made a short film in several months now (aside from filming half of one at the beginning of the pandemic which got postponed due to it). It's getting time to get back to it. The pandemic is slowing down, friends are more willing to meet up and work together again on passion projects, I've got three scripts I'm planning to film soonish. Just waiting on some new equipment I'm trying to get to arrive. Perhaps a high dynamic range pen.
    Last edited by Eric Coughlin; 06-01-2020 at 09:48 PM.


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    So, here's what I think might be/should be your next steps. You have your collection of shorts. Select 3-4 best ones and keep it on your Vimeo channel. Remove the rest (but upload them somewhere on YouTube, just in case someone demands an instant access)

    Use your friends' connections to pitch yourself - via your top shorts - to the LA/NYC based talent agents. You've done well at the local film festivals, so somewhere along the way, this type of a connection ought to exist.

    The idea is to then pitch the script to a streaming service with yourself as a writer/director/producer and get a commensurate budget/fee to film it. With 1-hr major productions running as high as $12M-$15M/episode, streamers ought to welcome the lower budget productions, as long as the quality is there. I figure that a 6-min short ought to be in the $150K-$250K/range. And you know your own costs already.

    The key is getting an agent. And that's a hard part.


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