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    https://www.yahoo.com/news/gov-gavin...025203055.html

    An LA Times article on the restart in the entertainment industry that appeared on Yahoo.


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    I would love work culture to shift more towards project / outcome based as opposed to time based.

    That's one of the biggest reasons why this field attracted me. I'm given a project, we mutually agree on a suitable price, and I go to work. However long that takes me is up to me. If I'm efficient, great. If I'm not, too bad for me.

    I dislike the idea that we're to arbitrarily be present for 8 hours at our desks, whether remote or onsite, regardless of workload. And that you are judged more for how much time you are present for versus how much you produce.

    At your standard salary job, there's no real incentive to be faster because you have to be there anyway.

    I know this doesn't work for all industries, but I really wish more would adopt that output-based work model going forward.


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    Senior Member Batutta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP View Post
    I would love work culture to shift more towards project / outcome based as opposed to time based.

    That's one of the biggest reasons why this field attracted me. I'm given a project, we mutually agree on a suitable price, and I go to work. However long that takes me is up to me. If I'm efficient, great. If I'm not, too bad for me.

    I dislike the idea that we're to arbitrarily be present for 8 hours at our desks, whether remote or onsite, regardless of workload. And that you are judged more for how much time you are present for versus how much you produce.
    This is the main reason I went freelance. I'm a fast editor and was working for a cable network, doing maybe 3 hours of work in a ten hour day. When I started doing freelance on the side, I kept getting offered more and more, did the math and realized for the same salary I was getting I could work freelance, be at home with my kid and manage my time much better.
    "Money doesn't make films...You just do it and take the initiative." - Werner Herzog


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    Senior Member ahalpert's Avatar
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    Amen, especially the part about increased family time


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    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP View Post
    I would love work culture to shift more towards project / outcome based as opposed to time based.

    That's one of the biggest reasons why this field attracted me. I'm given a project, we mutually agree on a suitable price, and I go to work. However long that takes me is up to me. If I'm efficient, great. If I'm not, too bad for me.

    I dislike the idea that we're to arbitrarily be present for 8 hours at our desks, whether remote or onsite, regardless of workload. And that you are judged more for how much time you are present for versus how much you produce.

    At your standard salary job, there's no real incentive to be faster because you have to be there anyway.

    I know this doesn't work for all industries, but I really wish more would adopt that output-based work model going forward.
    I have some clients that are like this. They want to get those 10 hours they’re paying for, regardless if there’s only three hours of actual work. A lot of those shoots you can just look at the times and when we’re supposed to shoot and what, and tell they back-timed them to get their 10. And then you have the ones that ‘get it’ and you just show-up, do what you need to do and leave. And everyone is much happier and usually more efficient and productive.

    There used to be a guy with a production company here in town who was infamous for his 9:45 days. A friend has a story with him that goes something like, they finished the shoot way early(multi-person crew), got everything packed and the guy wanted everyone to come back to his office to finish the day out working on stuff there(building shelves, cleaning, etc.). Keep in mind everyone is freelance, no one is an employee. My buddy said NO, you paid me to shoot, not build shelves and cut your grass and he left and went home.


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    When I was in high school, my dad found me a very reputable - the best in town! - math tutor. Private tutoring was a big business in the USSR since colleges/universities had actual entrance exams instead of a very generic SAT test. And top tutors, who were well known high school teachers or college professors, were making huge money, 3-4 times their high school/college wages. Which gave many a big head. On my second study session, our meister-shyster told us to lick a bunch of envelopes on his behalf, then lick the postage stamp onto them. Two of my study group partners (one girl, one guy) licked. I wouldn't. He didn't like that but I told my dad later that night that I would not go back.

    PS. I was in a "gifted" program in my high school anyway. Our statewide algebra/calculus "superfinal", that was given in most high schools simultaneously, was a 4-hour 5-problem marathon. I was done in 22 minutes. Two years later, I had a 98 average in business calculus. Which taught me a valuable lesson. Had I kept licking those envelopes, I may have gotten a 100.


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    Quote Originally Posted by DLD View Post
    When I was in high school, my dad found me a very reputable - the best in town! - math tutor. Private tutoring was a big business in the USSR since colleges/universities had actual entrance exams instead of a very generic SAT test. And top tutors, who were well known high school teachers or college professors, were making huge money, 3-4 times their high school/college wages. Which gave many a big head. On my second study session, our meister-shyster told us to lick a bunch of envelopes on his behalf, then lick the postage stamp onto them. Two of my study group partners (one girl, one guy) licked. I wouldn't. He didn't like that but I told my dad later that night that I would not go back.

    PS. I was in a "gifted" program in my high school anyway. Our statewide algebra/calculus "superfinal", that was given in most high schools simultaneously, was a 4-hour 5-problem marathon. I was done in 22 minutes. Two years later, I had a 98 average in business calculus. Which taught me a valuable lesson. Had I kept licking those envelopes, I may have gotten a 100.
    You're natural born storyteller, this is great. This would make a fun 2 minute film script.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    Quote Originally Posted by puredrifting View Post
    You're natural born storyteller, this is great. This would make a fun 2 minute film script.
    True story too. I even remember that tutor's name. Late fall 1977.

    Business calculus was in the US, Wisconsin-Milwaukee, spring semester 1981.

    FWIW, in late 1977, I still thought about scholastic career in the USSR but my parents, by then, already made the decision about emigrating. The Soviet "superfinals" are fairly difficult. Eight topics - written algebra, aural trigonometry, aural physics, aural chemistry, essay, "native tongue", history/politics and .... well, maybe it was seven. Over twenty four - twenty five days in June, after the regular schedule was completed. Sort of like a post-season/playoffs in US sports. Each subject covers 4-5 years of junior and senior high classes, with every topic addressed beforehand. High school grads would begin studying for them about six months in advance. I had to split time between studying and the World Cup'78, which was televised fully during the same time frame.

    I did pretty well but Argentina did even better.
    Last edited by DLD; 05-22-2020 at 10:15 PM.


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    Ok, so who plays you DLD? Elya Baskin, Daniel Craig, Vladimir Moshkov, ....?

    Let's shoot this thing.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F View Post
    Ok, so who plays you DLD? Elya Baskin, Daniel Craig, Vladimir Moshkov, ....? ... .
    oQ4ZuOGoZ5dPDiLxri6ZPQLewAU.jpg


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