Page 2 of 10 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 100
  1. Collapse Details
    #11
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    4,396
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by John Brawley View Post
    Cause you can't make out with the girl your parents don't even know you've been seeing ?

    Said half in jest and half in truth.

    Going to the cinema is a whole experience and it's about who you go with.
    Lord only knows how much money I spent in Jr High and High School going to the movies with a girl and never saw frame one from the previews through the end of the credits. I remember one time in maybe 9th grade(early 90's for those curious), my GF's mom picking us up afterwards and then asking us about the movie. Talk about not studying for the test...


    2 out of 2 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #12
    Director of Photography
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    1,766
    Default
    Oh boy. This is a tough one.

    I fear that I've become "part of the problem", because I have really slacked off on going to the movies in recent years. A certain amount of this is due to having a 100" screen and projector and 8 in-wall speakers, so watching a movie at home is immersive. And I can't complain about the lessening of the moviegoing experience in recent years due to people misbehaving in the theatre, because when I do go it's generally to a higher-end spot like Arclight Hollywood. So yep, I am part of the problem.

    But that said, I do go to festivals and special screenings and love the experience of a classic moviehouse like the main screen at the Chinese Theatre and the Cinerama Dome. I saw a preview of Once Upon A Time In Hollywood at the Dome with Tarantino sitting two rows behind me (could hear him laugh during the movie) and of course we all cheered when the exterior of that theatre came up in the movie itself. So, maybe there is life in this old boy yet.

    I can easily see why people are staying home more though. Tickets are expensive and many theatres are not as vigilant with the QC as they should be (never have been). This is a tough road to follow, and obviously it will now be many months before packed moviehouses becomes a thing again. I do wonder if this will be the tipping point and what percentage of theatres will still be open five years from now.
    Charles Papert
    charlespapert.com


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    132
    Default
    Love going to the movie theater!

    Hope they stay open in the future.


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #14
    Senior Member Mark Williams's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Deep South, U.S.
    Posts
    1,173
    Default
    Don't much care if they stay open as I don't frequent them. Have never liked crowds. I do the pay for view thing when new movies come out.
    Regards,

    Mark

    GH5, Panasonic 12-60, 14-45, 45-175, Olympus 60 macro, 75-300, Benro S6 Tripod, Rhino Carbon 24" Slider, and Edius 8.5 WG.
    Video channel: https://vimeo.com/channels/3523
    Stock Video: https://www.pond5.com/artist/mark29#1/2063


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #15
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    5,227
    Default
    Even Fellini noticed more than 30 years ago that people were not going to theaters, other than extravaganzas like 'Star Wars'. So, true cinema has been "dead" for a long time. Whatever art or cultural significance Nolan pretends to be preserving has little to do with what cinema meant before the 90's.


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    963
    Default
    Did you all see these numbers?

    The US box office made just $5K in the last week of March
    The same time last year, it made over $200 million.
    https://www.cnet.com/news/the-us-box...week-in-march/


    Numbers from here:

    Domestic Box Office Weeklies For 2020
    https://www.boxofficemojo.com/weekly...y_secondarytab

    Going to be tough going for theaters....
    ----------
    Jim Feeley
    POV Media


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #17
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    5,227
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by John Brawley View Post
    Cause you can't make out with the girl your parents don't even know you've been seeing ?

    Said half in jest and half in truth.
    Ha! Well, I don't think we need theaters for that.

    Going to the cinema is a whole experience and it's about who you go with.
    Yes, but you have to understand the CONTEXT, that for the next year, we are in a pandemic state, and going into a closed room with a couple hundred people eating Popcorn with our hands sitting in chairs occupied by another set of people a few hours earlier....

    it is a different time. Maybe next Summer. Not right after lock down is lifted.


    I for one love the anonymity of going into a darkened room and sharing a viewing experience in an audience with a bunch of strangers.
    Sure, but it isn't the experience that is the problem, and it isn't the cost, and it isn't the competition for audiences, and maybe it isn't even the content.... it is all of the above. something has to change.

    When Movie pass was at its peak, I started seeing people going on a whim again. Yet, it isn't a viable business model.

    I know theaters don't make money from the ticket sales, so I always buy pop corn and a drink. Not sure that movie companies are going to lower ticket sales for theaters to save them. No, the whole thing is weird. I see families stressing out about money in theaters. Exhaling when they purchase 5 tickets, because now that family just dropped $100, and still have to go get food and drinks. And these are NOT good food and drinks, these are the cheapest food and beverages we can come up with. Yet they cost as much as a fancy lunch at a boutique cafe.

    The sense of community and watching in the dark is replaced by stress and "was it worth it" for a lot of lower income people. So, movies are for the middle class and up now. Great. Cool, let them save theaters. They won't, because the middle class is shrinking too. But movie theaters are still getting more expensive and not adapting in other ways.

    It's not really the same but you're kind of arguing that you can stay home and listen to a good record or streaming version of a song on a decent HiFi.
    Here's the thing, you know I am not arguing that.

    Or you could go out with a friend or mates and listen to what's often a worse sounding (technically) version of the same song but played live with the vibe that only a live audience of 100 or more other like minded and invested individuals can bring to that space. You're going to talk to them or bump into them in that space, your people. Strangers drawn together by a common interest.
    Music is not the same. If we had rooms for people to go sit and listen to music together in silence for a couple hours for $20, not sure how often most people would go.

    Music is a performance art, and most often there is at least a DJ. Also people are interacting with music usually. Even the opera is not common for most people, because it isn't interactive, and it isn't cheap enough to go regularly. But metaphors are a slippery slope, and very easy to derail an argument built around them.

    it's funny you say 90's cinema because I think that dates you.
    Why? I mentioned it as the last decade before wide spread internet. By 2008, people were watching quite a bit of content online and on their phones.

    They've been saying cinema is dead for decades, way before the 90's that you're pointing to as some golden era. Firstly with TV, then home entertainment like VHS, then DVD then home projectors became affordable and now streaming.
    Words like "cinema" in English mean a few different things. important to distinguish what exactly we are talking about, I suppose. "Cinema" can be the art form, the industry, the product, and the theaters. What we are talking about right now, is theaters. It can be argued that "cinema as an art" as a living vibrant art, has been passed by a long time ago. Perhaps the 70's was the last decade for it. Maybe TV killed cinema as an Art.

    Cinemas aren't going anywhere because there's nothing that replicates that experience. While you personally might not enjoy that,
    in the context of a pandemic, I don't want to be in a closed room. You have to factor in the context of what I am saying.

    I don't think the idea of us gathering around a fire to hear stories is going anywhere.
    Now, I definitely am not bashing sharing Stories as a general concept either. I went from saying theaters should adapt, and during this pandemic I am not paying to be in a confine space.... to I don't think people need to share stories? Give me some credit.

    Yeah you can make your own fire and stay in your own bubble, but the bigger fire with the bigger audience of random people is a very different experience, especially if its your kids and you don't know what they're up to.
    That's a bit extreme. It isn't movie theaters or isolation. And it isn't movie theaters or the death of share stories. It is that movie theaters have to adapt. Because for most movies, people just aren't going. It is all about tentpole films now.

    I enjoy streaming and I like that HDR TV's give me such a great viewing experience, but if you go to a good cinema, it's hardly the same.
    WE ARE IN A PANDEMIC SITUATION.

    I saw Roma in a sold out audience in London and it was a completely different experience in viewing to watching it at home on Netflix. They're just different. One isn't better than the other. They just offer different things to different people.
    Not too long ago, I got to see a print of 'Star Wars' with some of the film makers and a huge audience of super fans. There was no CGI, and it was projected through film. Really fun. I also remember the pretty fantastic reaction to crowds of audiences during the last Avengers movie. Huge sense of community...

    ...But that doesn't happen enough to keep theaters in business.

    I'd even argue watching a FILM print is quite a different experience to watching a digital projection. I recently saw a rare print of Se7ven that had been chemically altered for it's US theatrical run. The cinema was completely sold out and after watching the film at home before and then again in the cinema, I know which version I prefered. The one where I was jammed in with hundred os strangers palpably all having the same reactions I was to certain scenes on what's arguably a technically inferior medium if you listen to some. That shared cinema experience isn't something you replicate at home. Nor should you try to.
    Saw a documentary from the 80's, that was shot and printed on 16mm. Really felt more connected that the materials were analogue. Felt a more direct physical connection to the images, know how real and primal it is. not seperated by the translation of digital code.

    JB
    Well, JB, you may be reading the fact that I am unsympathetic to the business model of theaters, as if I dislike the idea of sharing stories with community, but that is because I only wrote a few paragraphs quickly. And, because you don't know me, or make note of me on these forums. Which is fine.

    DVXuser is just one of the places I share stories with a community in anonymity. ;)
    Last edited by James0b57; 04-06-2020 at 05:45 PM.


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    579
    Default
    James I think you're vehemently defending a strange position. You're saying cinemas shouldn't be "saved" and they are no longer relevant (i'm paraphrasing) i think.

    And then you're conflating that ideology with a temporary state that COVID has brought about, which is to say that we can't gather in public.

    That's only a temporary moment in time, at some point in the not to distant future, we're going to be allowed to go back into movie cinemas again. The market will of course decide if they are to be saved, but I think there's more than 100 years of going to movies through many economic and social upheavals that says they will still be doing business.

    I'm positing that we will always want to gather in public and watch stories, that cinema has long fought off predictions of it's death and I expect it will do the same here because it offers a unique and very HUMAN experience.

    We're all locked in now, effectively living the alternative utopian dream of watching movies at home and not going to cinemas. I suspect people will be pretty stir crazy before long and be aching to go out and have a cinema experience as soon as it's permitted. I'm sure some will be afraid of gatherings. I'm sure some permanent changes to social behaviours will be in evidence. But I think cinemas are still going to be a place people will pay to go. Because as is all too painfully obvious, we don't do well staying at home even when we have everything we need.

    I think your argument about tentpole movies is a bit misleading. It's also very US centric.

    WORLD cinema is still out there. It's always been out there. It's just really really hard to see it in a cinema in the US. I was living in Atlanta for a couple of seasons of a show and there were dozens of tentpole movie theaters out there, but almost none that would show a film like Mustang or "A Prophet" or even "Pontypool" or "Silent Light" which are all films I saw in cinemas in Australia. Maybe in LA or NY I could see those films in a cinema, but most of the rest of the US, no way.

    Australia is still pretty bad for having mostly CHAIN theaters, but they do have fiercely independent cinemas and they only survive because people go to those cinemas. Many of them closed between 2000 and 2010. I remember seeing Salo and "Irreversible" in Melbourne during those years, both incredibly difficult movies in cinemas that are now closed. But there are still cinemas in that town that screen those kinds of movies. And I just don't see the same appetite for that kid of breadth of cinema in the US where the focus is far more culturally internal and...frankly vacuous. While shooting in Vancouver I found a great korean cinema and without even looking up trailers I walked in and I saw both "The Tunnel" and "Last Train to Busan" and they were both great films.

    Americans don't seem that curious about world cinema or seeing world cinema IN a cinema. Many of the places I've worked in the US either do not have an independent cinema, nor do they have even art house cinemas in many "big" cities. I think that's really sad. I was just working in the UK and even the 15 cinema chain multiplex in the local shopping center as well as AMERICAN studio / tentpole films, also screened indian language films regularly. Not just once off. The whole 6 months I was there.

    I just can't imagine that happening in the US. Maybe it does, but I've never seen it.

    I can't even image easily seeing a domestic US film like "American Honey" or "Spring Breakers" though Spring Breakers was interesting to a certain crowd i'm sure given the imagery.

    Cinema is a HABBIT. As Charles mentioned he fell out of the habit. If you only have a fast food diet of tentpole movies, which I agree, are mostly dreck then you're going to need to change your eating habits and eat at home.

    Cinemas will certainly have to adapt to new circumstances, but I'd like to think I think the American audience can adapt as well and broaden it's cultural horizons. Perversely, I think it's streamers that have started to break though the old US stereotypes of an audience that can't be bothered reading subtitles on a show, but the theatrical market is filled with chains that sell the same culturally bland stuff. I mean franchises are what's really wrong here. Both in terms of storytelling forms AND in terms of the mega corporations that control what films are actually programmed into these cinemas.

    Maybe I'm being idealistic and assuming "the masses" want to broaden their cultural exposure ? I've never really thought about class with regards to who goes to a cinema, based on a price.

    I also see a lot of other prolific film making countries that have some of the poorest humans on this world and they all still go and watch movies in a way that outpaces the US. Is it just economics that are keeping "working class" people away in the US or is it the fact that most working class Americans seem to be working three jobs ?

    JB
    Last edited by John Brawley; 04-06-2020 at 09:46 PM.
    Cinematographer
    New Orleans Louisiana
    www.johnbrawley.com
    I also have a blog


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #19
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    5,227
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by John Brawley View Post
    I'm positing that we will always want to gather in public and watch stories, that cinema has long fought off predictions of it's death and I expect it will do the same here because it offers a unique and very HUMAN experience.
    No one is arguing with that.


    Nolan wrote about saving theaters specifically. And a lot of this is in part because of the extreme losses theaters experience in a pandemic. That is what started this thread. No one is arguing against what you are saying.


    I am mainly just trying to get you to stop making me sound like i am anti cinema or something.


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    New Orleans
    Posts
    579
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post

    I am mainly just trying to get you to stop making me sound like i am anti cinema or something.
    James, I'm only going by your words. Someone posted an article actually written by Chris Nolan advocating that we remember to support cinema (Theater's in your vernacular) WHEN IT'S SAFE to do so.

    Your first response was your opinion about cinema going, especially during a pandemic, which Nolan wasn't arguing for....

    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    Time has past for the 90’s era movie theater. It has to evolve.
    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    movie theaters do not hold that value at this time, pandemic or no.
    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    The model for theaters and the content is far too commercial to be worth saving.
    and then this

    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    if a movie theater experience with popcorn and a drink can cost roughly $25, and one could buy a sound system for $500, and get 90% of the theater experience from their home on the 60” tv they already own, then what exactly is a film shot a year or two ago going to help us feel when we have so many other ways of experiencing shared experiences?
    I was trying to suggest that there's a bigger picture here about cinema and cinema going generally, not viewed through your 90's-skewed US centric nostalgia for what you think is the glory days of cinema...

    Nolan himself answers you in his article...

    "Maybe, like me, you thought you were going to the movies for surround sound, or Goobers, or soda and popcorn, or movie stars. But we weren’t. We were there for each other."

    I'm not trying tp pick on you, we're having a discussion or even a debate about what cinema means to people. You're seeing it as a personal attack and I'm just debating your OPINION. If you didn't mean to make those statements, or want to argue something different then isn't that why we're here ? My views are also just my opinion. We're both equal here.

    JB
    Last edited by John Brawley; 04-07-2020 at 09:34 AM.
    Cinematographer
    New Orleans Louisiana
    www.johnbrawley.com
    I also have a blog


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 2 of 10 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •