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    Chris Nolan Saving Movie Theaters
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    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.was...outputType=amp



    Christoper Nolan and saving movie theaters across the country
    From article:


    ”The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted several industries, particularly the filmmaking business. With the government weighing financial relief programs for thousands of businesses, Christopher Nolan wants to make sure that movie theaters are not forgotten.”
    Last edited by niki; 03-22-2020 at 04:48 PM.


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    What will happen to movie theaters?


    Christopher NolanKurt Iswarienko for Variety
    With thousands of theaters shut down across the country due to the coronavirus pandemic, filmmaker Christopher Nolan urges people to show their support when they reopen. In an essay for The Washington Post, Nolan calls movie theaters a “vital part of social life” that not only provides entertainment for everyone, but also jobs for many people.

    Nolan, whose new movie “Tenet” is due July 17, has always preferred the traditional theatrical experience over streaming. He was once critical of Netflix, saying their straight-to-subscriber process was “mindless,” but later apologized and called the streaming giant “revolutionary” in an interview with Variety.


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    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by niki
    filmmaker Christopher Nolan urges people to show their support when they reopen. In an essay for The Washington Post, Nolan calls movie theaters a “vital part of social life”.
    He is so disconnected.

    Time has past for the 90’s era movie theater. It has to evolve.

    And i for one will not be jumping to spend time in a closed room with a hundred or more people for 3hrs (because he only makes long movies now), just not going to do it.

    If art is to be an essential part of society, then it has to have some relevance.... movie theaters do not hold that value at this time, pandemic or no.

    I remember going to the theater prior to the internet, and before HD. Definitely was an important part of society back then.

    Now? I like it, but i don’t see it as essential in its current form. The model for theaters and the content is far too commercial to be worth saving. Like newspapers, if we all carry a reading device, why waste the resources to make giant paper sunday papers?

    Movie theaters should not be trying to hold onto the glimmer of cultural relevance it once had. And the insult is that the business model has not changed, but doubled down on 90’s theater experience.

    In the 90’s, it was the pinnacle of technology and a way for the masses to share in a cultural experience and ideals. But the business aspect was lazy because it knew we had no other option, and prices began to go up, while experiences didn’t. Shortly after the internet and cellphones altered the way we shared information, and that made the theater experience just a preference, and no longer essential.

    Now here we are in a pandemic aware society and theaters are still trying to get hundreds of people to hot box in a closed room together.

    Consider this, if a movie theater experience with popcorn and a drink can cost roughly $25, and one could buy a sound system for $500, and get 90% of the theater experience from their home on the 60” tv they already own, then what exactly is a film shot a year or two ago going to help us feel when we have so many other ways of experiencing shared experiences? $25 in 20 times will afford some one a fairly good sound system. And you don’t even have to worry about bedbugs or some stranger talking over the movie.
    Last edited by James0b57; 03-26-2020 at 02:48 PM.


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    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    I remember going to the theater prior to the internet, and before HD....
    Now? I like it, but i don’t see it as essential in its current form....

    In the 90’s, it was the pinnacle of technology...

    Consider this, if a move experience with popcorn and a drink can cost roughly $25, and one could buy a sound system for $500, and get 90% of the theater experience from their home on the 60” tv they already own, then what exactly is a film shot a year or two ago going to help us feel when we have so many other ways of experiencing shared experiences? $25 in 20 times will afford some one a fairly good sound system. And you don’t even have to worry about bedbugs or some stranger talking over the movie.

    Technology and the experience that can be had at home now, is the big thing. For the average person, the 'at home' experience was always going to be very sub-par 20-30 years ago. Small SD CRT's, VHS tapes, internal TV speakers. Few people had laser discs. Then we got DVD's and quality jumped, but most people were still watching on small SD CRT's. Things improved again with HD, Blu-ray and affordable surround sound, but the average person's home experience was still far from the movie theater even though it had jumped exponentially over what we had in the SD days. But now, with very large affordable UHD flat panels and even larger affordable HD/UHD projectors, you can get an excellent experience with minimal cost and effort, now. No, most people will never have a screen in their house as large as what the average commercial movie theater has, but the average commercial movie theater now has much less to offer over the home experience compared to the 90's. For most releases, there is almost no reason for me to go to the theater vs. watching at home.


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    What you don't get at home is the communal experience that you get when watching a film in a theater. While I rarely go to the theater, I do go to film festivals, which tend to be the venues that show the types of films I am most interested in. I usually find comedies to be funnier, and thrillers to be more thrilling, suspense films more suspenseful, when seen in theaters and sharing the experience with many other people. (However, I will concede that for straight dramas and documentaries, there seems to be decidedly less of an effect on the viewing experience. On the other hand, since I have only a 50 inch screen at home, I do at times miss the 30-60 foot screens in theaters...)


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    Quote Originally Posted by KMR View Post
    What you don't get at home is the communal experience that you get when watching a film in a theater. ..)
    No, my wife is still sitting right next to me, asking me to explain what happened, or asking... Now who is he?

    The difference is at home she is not disrupting anyone else but me. And I can pause the movie, explain, then replay.


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    Quote Originally Posted by David W. Jones View Post
    No, my wife is still sitting right next to me, asking me to explain what happened, or asking... Now who is he?

    The difference is at home she is not disrupting anyone else but me. And I can pause the movie, explain, then replay.
    Is that good or bad? :-)


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    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post

    Consider this, if a movie theater experience with popcorn and a drink can cost roughly $25, and one could buy a sound system for $500, and get 90% of the theater experience from their home on the 60” tv they already own, then what exactly is a film shot a year or two ago going to help us feel when we have so many other ways of experiencing shared experiences? $25 in 20 times will afford some one a fairly good sound system.

    Cause you can't make out with the girl your parents don't even know you've been seeing ?

    Said half in jest and half in truth.

    Going to the cinema is a whole experience and it's about who you go with.

    I for one love the anonymity of going into a darkened room and sharing a viewing experience in an audience with a bunch of strangers.

    It's not really the same but you're kind of arguing that you can stay home and listen to a good record or streaming version of a song on a decent HiFi. Or you could go out with a friend or mates and listen to what's often a worse sounding (technically) version of the same song but played live with the vibe that only a live audience of 100 or more other like minded and invested individuals can bring to that space. You're going to talk to them or bump into them in that space, your people. Strangers drawn together by a common interest.

    it's funny you say 90's cinema because I think that dates you.

    They've been saying cinema is dead for decades, way before the 90's that you're pointing to as some golden era. Firstly with TV, then home entertainment like VHS, then DVD then home projectors became affordable and now streaming.

    Cinemas aren't going anywhere because there's nothing that replicates that experience. While you personally might not enjoy that, I don't think the idea of us gathering around a fire to hear stories is going anywhere. Yeah you can make your own fire and stay in your own bubble, but the bigger fire with the bigger audience of random people is a very different experience, especially if its your kids and you don't know what they're up to.

    I enjoy streaming and I like that HDR TV's give me such a great viewing experience, but if you go to a good cinema, it's hardly the same.

    I saw Roma in a sold out audience in London and it was a completely different experience in viewing to watching it at home on Netflix. They're just different. One isn't better than the other. They just offer different things to different people.

    I'd even argue watching a FILM print is quite a different experience to watching a digital projection. I recently saw a rare print of Se7ven that had been chemically altered for it's US theatrical run. The cinema was completely sold out and after watching the film at home before and then again in the cinema, I know which version I prefered. The one where I was jammed in with hundred os strangers palpably all having the same reactions I was to certain scenes on what's arguably a technically inferior medium if you listen to some. That shared cinema experience isn't something you replicate at home. Nor should you try to.

    JB
    Last edited by John Brawley; 04-04-2020 at 01:16 PM.
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    I also have a blog


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    Quote Originally Posted by John Brawley View Post
    Cause you can't make out with the girl your parents don't even know you've been seeing ?

    Said half in jest and half in truth.

    Going to the cinema is a whole experience and it's about who you go with.

    I for one love the anonymity of going into a darkened room and sharing a viewing experience in an audience with a bunch of strangers.

    It's not really the same but you're kind of arguing that you can stay home and listen to a good record or streaming version of a song on a decent HiFi. Or you could go out with a friend or mates and listen to what's often a worse sounding (technically) version of the same song but played live with the vibe that only a live audience of 100 or more other like minded and invested individuals can bring to that space. You're going to talk to them or bump into them in that space, your people. Strangers drawn together by a common interest.

    it's funny you say 90's cinema because I think that dates you.

    They've been saying cinema is dead for decades, way before the 90's that you're pointing to as some golden era. Firstly with TV, then home entertainment like VHS, then DVD then home projectors became affordable and now streaming.

    Cinemas aren't going anywhere because there's nothing that replicates that experience. While you personally might not enjoy that, I don't think the idea of us gathering around a fire to hear stories is going anywhere. Yeah you can make your own fire and stay in your own bubble, but the bigger fire with the bigger audience of random people is a very different experience, especially if its your kids and you don't know what they're up to.

    I enjoy streaming and I like that HDR TV's give me such a great viewing experience, but if you go to a good cinema, it's hardly the same.

    I saw Roma in a sold out audience in London and it was a completely different experience in viewing to watching it at home on Netflix. They're just different. One isn't better than the other. They just offer different things to different people.

    I'd even argue watching a FILM print is quite a different experience to watching a digital projection. I recently saw a rare print of Se7ven that had been chemically altered for it's US theatrical run. The cinema was completely sold out and after watching the film at home before and then again in the cinema, I know which version I prefered. The one where I was jammed in with hundred os strangers palpably all having the same reactions I was to certain scenes on what's arguably a technically inferior medium if you listen to some. That shared cinema experience isn't something you replicate at home. Nor should you try to.

    JB
    Thankyou John


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    Quote Originally Posted by KMR View Post
    What you don't get at home is the communal experience that you get when watching a film in a theater. While I rarely go to the theater, I do go to film festivals, which tend to be the venues that show the types of films I am most interested in. I usually find comedies to be funnier, and thrillers to be more thrilling, suspense films more suspenseful, when seen in theaters and sharing the experience with many other people. (However, I will concede that for straight dramas and documentaries, there seems to be decidedly less of an effect on the viewing experience. On the other hand, since I have only a 50 inch screen at home, I do at times miss the 30-60 foot screens in theaters...)
    Quote Originally Posted by Publimix View Post
    Is that good or bad? :-)
    Another reason to watch at home...

    I've been to a few sold out premiers of big movies and in a way it was cool, but by far and large, I'm fine without it. That's why I always like to go to late shows in the middle of the week. I get the prime seat that I want and I don't have to worry about someone talking or walking and sitting in front of me or any of the other myriad number of things that happen in a public movie theater. I'm actually fine with it when my GF doesn't want to watch something with me so I don't have to field questions that I may not know the answer to, because it may be the first time I'm seeing the movie, as well or otherwise unfamiliar with the story.

    Don't get me wrong, I don't want theaters to go away, but I don't think they are the necessity they were nor do they have the vastly superior "experience" advantage that they once did(outside of IMAX and the like). Sure, there are some movies every now and again that will just be "better" in a commercial theater with a hundred other people to experience it with at the same time, but those are few and far between, today.


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