Page 6 of 28 FirstFirst ... 234567891016 ... LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 273
  1. Collapse Details
    #51
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    615
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by David Jimerson View Post
    Not sure that's so. I had Ghostbusters on VHS in 1985 and Back to the Future in 1986. I didn't really pay close attention to everything, but I do remember Fatal Attraction being available in 1988.
    The "normal" release window was 1-2 years for the film in theaters, and even then it would be in the big cities first and then roll out to smaller regional centers. And often there were mopnths and sometimes years difference in countries (territories) as well. Worldwide simultaneous release only became a thing to try and beat pirates or when the film was really bad to try and beat word of mouth pre-internet. Pre home video.

    It started contracting, but initially was after it's 1-2 years in the cinema it then went to VHS RENTAL first....Also other venues like planes and ships.

    That was usually another year or so and THEN it would be available to buy about the same time it would get it's first run on TV.

    Again, no way it was normal for a VHS copy of a film to be "out" at the same time the film was in the cinema. There was always a tiered release schedule of some kind.

    No way was a VHS ever going to look as good as a FILM PRINT in a cinema either.

    JB


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #52
    Default
    From an editorial on the same subject:

    «I go to the movies for a great many reasons, first and foremost to experience fantastic films. One essential reason I go to the movies, though, is to escape. And that sometimes means…escaping my home. But it’s all to get to a different place that I call home. A place where it’s dark and safe and anonymous, but where that safety affords me the privilege of luxuriating in something adventurous or even dangerous. A place where I’m inside myself, but also out there in the universe.»


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #53
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by John Brawley View Post
    The "normal" release window was 1-2 years for the film in theaters, and even then it would be in the big cities first and then roll out to smaller regional centers. And often there were mopnths and sometimes years difference in countries (territories) as well. Worldwide simultaneous release only became a thing to try and beat pirates or when the film was really bad to try and beat word of mouth pre-internet. Pre home video.

    It started contracting, but initially was after it's 1-2 years in the cinema it then went to VHS RENTAL first....Also other venues like planes and ships.

    That was usually another year or so and THEN it would be available to buy about the same time it would get it's first run on TV.

    Again, no way it was normal for a VHS copy of a film to be "out" at the same time the film was in the cinema. There was always a tiered release schedule of some kind.
    Of course there was a release schedule. Nonetheless, the VHS release date of Ghostbusters -- a movie which opened in theaters on June 8, 1984 -- was October 31, 1985. At least in North America.

    When Back to the Future was released on VHS in 1986, it included for the first time the "to be continued" card at the end, which was not seen in the theater.

    Others --

    Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan was released to theaters in June 1982; the VHS release was November 1982. Poltergeist was released in theaters on the same day as STII; it was also released to VHS in 1982.

    Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home was released in theaters November 1986; the VHS release was September 1987.

    I bring these up because they're tapes I had.

    Again, though, these were North American releases. It may have been different in Australia.



    No way was a VHS ever going to look as good as a FILM PRINT in a cinema either.
    Of course not.
    LEARN FILMMAKING - DIGITAL STREAMING AND DOWNLOADS OF GREAT TRAINING PROGRAMS!



    WRITING FOR TELEVISION ARTICLE | "ASSUMPTION BLUES" FILM NOIR RADIO PLAY | "BLUE SCARLET" RADIO PLAY



    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #54
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by niki View Post
    From an editorial on the same subject:

    «I go to the movies for a great many reasons, first and foremost to experience fantastic films. One essential reason I go to the movies, though, is to escape. And that sometimes means…escaping my home. But it’s all to get to a different place that I call home. A place where it’s dark and safe and anonymous, but where that safety affords me the privilege of luxuriating in something adventurous or even dangerous. A place where I’m inside myself, but also out there in the universe.»
    Which one was this from?


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #55
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    2,066
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Run&Gun View Post
    Technology and the experience that can be had at home now, is the big thing. For the average person, the 'at home' experience was always going to be very sub-par 20-30 years ago. Small SD CRT's, VHS tapes, internal TV speakers. Few people had laser discs. Then we got DVD's and quality jumped, but most people were still watching on small SD CRT's. Things improved again with HD, Blu-ray and affordable surround sound, but the average person's home experience was still far from the movie theater even though it had jumped exponentially over what we had in the SD days. But now, with very large affordable UHD flat panels and even larger affordable HD/UHD projectors, you can get an excellent experience with minimal cost and effort, now. No, most people will never have a screen in their house as large as what the average commercial movie theater has, but the average commercial movie theater now has much less to offer over the home experience compared to the 90's. For most releases, there is almost no reason for me to go to the theater vs. watching at home.

    In a movie theatre the optimal seat is a fair few rows back (can't be the front row, but can't be at the back either), and you can't always get your optimal set! But at home I can always sit in the optimal seat, just like Sheldon Cooper.

    So you're very very far from the screen when sitting in a movie theatre, even when in the optimal seat.

    However at home that optimal set can be much much much closer, so you don't need a screen a hundred times bigger.

    That 60" screen/project will do the trick just perfectly!
    Am a Sound Recordist in New Zealand: http://ironfilm.co.nz/sound/
    Follow my vlog and adventures in sound: https://www.youtube.com/c/SoundSpeeding


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #56
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,223
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by IronFilm View Post
    In a movie theatre the optimal seat is a fair few rows back (can't be the front row, but can't be at the back either), and you can't always get your optimal set! But at home I can always sit in the optimal seat, just like Sheldon Cooper.

    So you're very very far from the screen when sitting in a movie theatre, even when in the optimal seat.

    However at home that optimal set can be much much much closer, so you don't need a screen a hundred times bigger.

    That 60" screen/project will do the trick just perfectly!
    The front row, or even first few rows, in a commercial theater are just a cruel joke. You are way below the screen level and so close that you are looking almost straight up the entire time. My optimal seat in a theater is dead-center vertically and horizontally, which does put you a little far back, at least in a lot of theaters. Funny enough though, at home in my den, none of the seating is centered, because of the layout of the room and furniture. In my recliner, I’m probably two to three feet off center and the couch is probably four to five. But in the bedroom, my spot in bed has me lined up with the center of the TV on the wall. Of course it’s mounted much higher than a person laying in the bed, but I have it tilted down so it’s pretty square from the viewing angle from there.


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #57
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    2,066
    Default
    Had a mate who projected movies onto his bedroom CEILING! So it would be perfect for when him (and a friend...) was lying in bed.
    Am a Sound Recordist in New Zealand: http://ironfilm.co.nz/sound/
    Follow my vlog and adventures in sound: https://www.youtube.com/c/SoundSpeeding


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #58
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    Which one was this from?


    Variety


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #59
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by niki View Post
    Variety
    Thanks. Do you have a link, or recall the title of the article?


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #60
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    Thanks. Do you have a link, or recall the title of the article?
    Sure I remember the title was

    “Why I Miss Movie Theaters, and Why Nothing Can Replace Them”

    Owen Gleiberman (I think wrote it)

    Yes he did (found it)

    https://variety.com/2020/film/column...rs-1234577997/
    Last edited by niki; 04-17-2020 at 01:32 PM.


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 6 of 28 FirstFirst ... 234567891016 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •