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    #31
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    I've only skimmed this thread but my impression of wireless anything is that it's one of those situations paying 10x for the pro solution doesn't make much if any practical difference, beyond the issues of robustness and convenience.

    I have had many of the major brands on review and most of them do not work noticeably better than the domestic stuff. The Amimon-branded models mentioned in this thread are often, depending on the exact model, higher-powered than the Nyrius-branded on paper. Tests of this sort of thing are hugely dependent on where you are and what else is in the area, on a moment-to-moment basis. I mention this only because if I don't, in any discussion of wireless equipment someone will pop up with an anecdote about how item x was superior to item y at some point. The reality is that there are huge random factors involved. All of these things are subject to very similar legal restrictions on what they are permitted to emit. Overcoming these legal limits requires licensing in most jurisdictions which is not practical for this sort of work.

    One thing you can do is to upgrade the antennae. Many of the boards in these (certainly the Nyrius Aries series) have U.FL (also called IPEX, AMC, UMCC, etc) connector on the PCB. It is possible to buy U.FL to SMA or RP-SMA cables (as appropriate) which make it possible to use higher-gain antennae; types designed for wifi routers operating in the same frequency range are generally suitable. This does make a significant difference to performance, even where the electronics may not have been set up to drive the antenna.

    Bear in mind that while this is done all the time, it may cause the device to exceed legal EIRP limits; in some jurisdictions this could in theory lead to the seizure of the transmitter and all attached equipment, which would be your entire camera and monitoring package (these devices are all transceivers, so the receivers emit too.)

    P


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    #32
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    At the moment I've got a pair of smallhd 702s and would like to add a sumo plus a wireless system, which now looks like the amimon is locked in. Thanks for all of this information, it will literally save me thousands of (Aussie) dollars one day!

    I always use the high gain setup with the long range receiver for the individual cameras. Stacking the deck for success!
    If buying a high gain antenna today would you buy your current antenna again or is there a more preferable option (I'm assuming it's from your previous systems)?

    With the double header set up who were the monitors for? Will you always do a double header then run cables to monitors even if they're a decent distance apart? Or would you go with a single stand/antenna per monitor if the distances are large enough?
    I'm sure it's different in Episodic Television but for example on commercial shoots I've worked on, often the agency is several hundred feet away from the crew.

    The first number is always 1, for the single transmitter, and the second for the number of receivers. With the Amimon chip, the maximum setup is 1:4.
    This clears everything up!

    Almost every job I do is cut to the bone on the camera budget, so the added costs of 4K monitoring are unlikely any time soon.
    This makes me feel much better about upping my HD monitoring this "late". It also makes me feel worse that the camera budget is cut to the bone on shoots of your level.


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    #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Rhodes View Post
    I've only skimmed this thread but my impression of wireless anything is that it's one of those situations paying 10x for the pro solution doesn't make much if any practical difference, beyond the issues of robustness and convenience.

    I have had many of the major brands on review and most of them do not work noticeably better than the domestic stuff. The Amimon-branded models mentioned in this thread are often, depending on the exact model, higher-powered than the Nyrius-branded on paper. Tests of this sort of thing are hugely dependent on where you are and what else is in the area, on a moment-to-moment basis. I mention this only because if I don't, in any discussion of wireless equipment someone will pop up with an anecdote about how item x was superior to item y at some point. The reality is that there are huge random factors involved. All of these things are subject to very similar legal restrictions on what they are permitted to emit. Overcoming these legal limits requires licensing in most jurisdictions which is not practical for this sort of work.

    One thing you can do is to upgrade the antennae. Many of the boards in these (certainly the Nyrius Aries series) have U.FL (also called IPEX, AMC, UMCC, etc) connector on the PCB. It is possible to buy U.FL to SMA or RP-SMA cables (as appropriate) which make it possible to use higher-gain antennae; types designed for wifi routers operating in the same frequency range are generally suitable. This does make a significant difference to performance, even where the electronics may not have been set up to drive the antenna.

    Bear in mind that while this is done all the time, it may cause the device to exceed legal EIRP limits; in some jurisdictions this could in theory lead to the seizure of the transmitter and all attached equipment, which would be your entire camera and monitoring package (these devices are all transceivers, so the receivers emit too.)

    P
    Thanks for the post Phil, great point about legal limits, something to look into for sure. A lot of this is beyond me at the moment but it'll be great to reference when the time comes.

    If committed to a wireless workflow then at some point you still need to make a decision on an actual product. For me, it was between the teradek bolt xt 500 or amimon mini with or without fusion receiver.

    I think where you get in trouble is when someone has obviously gone too cheap and ends up with a product that is built poorly and performs poorly. Personally with the amimons, the amazing range, size and price seem worth any babying on set.


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    #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob norton View Post
    If buying a high gain antenna today would you buy your current antenna again or is there a more preferable option (I'm assuming it's from your previous systems)?
    I'm not sure what is out there at this point--I imagine the Teradek ones are much cleaner in terms of cabling to the receivers themselves. All of this stuff is a bit of a wonky science--as Phil points out, conditions can wildly change the efficiency of a given system (which is why it's important to always think longer-range/more power). RF is a beast.

    With the double header set up who were the monitors for? Will you always do a double header then run cables to monitors even if they're a decent distance apart? Or would you go with a single stand/antenna per monitor if the distances are large enough?
    I'm sure it's different in Episodic Television but for example on commercial shoots I've worked on, often the agency is several hundred feet away from the crew.
    So my usual setup is that the receivers feed into my cart and I distro from there (the AC's have their own receivers at their monitors so they can be independent). For a typical narrative setup, we hardwire from my cart to video village, where there are another set of DA's for other departments to grab a feed (sound department, dimmer board op etc). As I think I mentioned in an earlier post above, I transmit a quad signal to various monitors around set as well. In terms of commercials, they generally hire a playback person who takes the feed from me and then distributes it everywhere needed including client monitors. I did do a low budget/non union commercial recently without such a person...the clients were sequestered in an upstairs bedroom at the house we shot at, and we ran a cable from their monitor to a receiver downstairs, and then moved it as needed to get good reception from a transmitter at my cart (which allowed me to move around without having to worry about that extra cable). Yuck!
    Charles Papert
    charlespapert.com


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