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    #21
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bassman2003 View Post
    Now this is an all in one design, how can we get this style of design/usability with larger sensor cameras?
    A: mirrorless designed zoom lenses are much more compact than previous designs for cameras involving mirrors. So, theoretically, the cameras could incorporate a good short zoom. But obviously smaller sensors give the real range.

    B: cellphones are becoming quite good at simulating dof, so, there would be some advantages to multilens camcorders that would perhaps defeat the need of a larger sensor.


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    #22
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bassman2003 View Post
    These thoughts are coming from a one man band approach and not so much of a camera op inside of a crew. So that is probably a clash of uses as the design needs change as the prices go up...
    I do agree with the idea that there are different tools for different jobs. I don’t think DSLR suffers from bad ergonomics. Most of the complaints about DSLR are true of even the C300, EVA1, and Fs5.


    But i’m talking about all of this more in depth over on this thread:
    http://www.dvxuser.com/V6/showthread...post1986820239
    Last edited by James0b57; 03-21-2020 at 06:37 PM.


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    #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    How do you mean? They look to perform similarly when an EVF is attached.
    I see issues with both of these photos from a support/control point of view. The DSLR shot has limited support and limited finger movement with the left hand. Hope you do not need to change anything besides the focus ring that is barely reachable. In my view, for truly stable footage one needs 3 solid touch points preferably on different axis' with some distance in between. The lower camcorder photo suffers from the same situation. The camera looks like it wants to fall towards the back left side.

    The photo of the DVX200 has better support but you can not get to the buttons. They way I film with these type of cameras is to turn the left hand over so my thumb is under the front left of the camera. This supports the front side of the weight and lets your fingers operate buttons/rings or support against camera roll with the other hand, pitch against the eyepiece and yaw. I am touching the camera as much as possible in different directions. If the shot is lower then I go lower. If I am walking I hold onto the LCD with the left hand and really concentrate on pitch and roll along with steadicam/ninja feet.

    Weight can be too light as well. Or size too small. One needs some physical area to hold and steady the camera. Weight adds momentum which can stop little jitters. IBIS does wonders but one still needs both hands and then some for true solid handheld work imho.
    Last edited by Bassman2003; 03-21-2020 at 07:44 PM.


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    #24
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bassman2003 View Post
    I see issues with both of these photos from a support/control point of view. The DSLR shot has limited support and limited finger movement with the left hand. Hope you do not need to change anything besides the focus ring that is barely reachable. In my view, for truly stable footage one needs 3 solid touch points preferably on different axis' with some distance in between. The lower camcorder photo suffers from the same situation. The camera looks like it wants to fall towards the back left side.

    The photo of the DVX200 has better support but you can not get to the buttons. They way I film with these type of cameras is to turn the left hand over so my thumb is under the front left of the camera. This supports the front side of the weight and lets your fingers operate buttons/rings or support against camera roll with the other hand, pitch against the eyepiece and yaw. I am touching the camera as much as possible in different directions. If the shot is lower then I go lower. If I am walking I hold onto the LCD with the left hand and really concentrate on pitch and roll along with steadicam/ninja feet.

    Weight can be too light as well. Or size too small. One needs some physical area to hold and steady the camera. Weight adds momentum which can stop little jitters. IBIS does wonders but one still needs both hands and then some for true solid handheld work imho.
    Still canít quite picture what you mean. And yes, i donít tend to use dslr or camcorder the way pictured.

    In any case, i agree that the idea of a camcorder has its own beauty. Self contained. Those zoom ranges are a delight.


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    #25
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    Biggest issue with DSLR's / Mirrorless is not form factor. It is rolling shutter.
    The old camcorders had very little of it because they were either CCD or very small sensors.
    So when you went handheld it wasn't that much of an issue and most people didn't even tuck an arm to their side for support.


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