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    I donít do windows.
    #1
    Senior Member JPNola's Avatar
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    Iím curious, who among you does not do any post?

    I only shoot and light. Never any editing, color correction, or other post work.

    I know of around 8 other Owner / Ops in my market and it is the same for all but one, maybe two of them.

    The discussions here about LUTs and grading and Premiere and such suggest that many of you do post-production.

    Chime in with whether you do post or are a DP / shooter only, like myself. Am I the more rare breed these days? It used to be that it was rare that a Cameraman did anything but shoot and light. Particularly since there was no home-editing system and editing systems cost upwards of $100K. Seems like only yesterday that everyone was buzzing over the Video Toaster software and wowing that it was possible to edit video on a consumer desktop computer. At one time in my career ďShooter / EditorĒ was a new thing. Later came ďPreditorĒ, a Producer / Editor.
    Big sources matter.


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    Senior Member ahalpert's Avatar
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    I edit and I love to. But I mostly only edit stuff that I've shot and am co-producing. I shoot lots that is edited by others, but it's rare that I edit something that someone else shot. My motion graphics skills are not very advanced because I'm not very interested in that type of work. But it's a lucrative skillset and the fact that I don't offer advanced graphics skills boxes me out of some work.


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    I started doing both at the same time just as iMovie started to really get going.

    Today, I think it's pretty rare you'll find someone not having some knowledge in both.

    Like a lot of people may decide to focus only on filming or editing as their main business or interest, but usually have pretty decent knowledge in operating a camera and have intermediate editing skills as well.


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    Senior Member JPNola's Avatar
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    I bet at times it is frustrating to edit content shot by someone else and to have to deal with poorly executed work. I’ve often wondered if some editor is cursing me as they work with material I have shot. Although I’ve never received any negative feedback.
    Big sources matter.


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    Senior Member El Director's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPNola View Post
    I bet at times it is frustrating to edit content shot by someone else and to have to deal with poorly executed work. I’ve often wondered if some editor is cursing me as they work with material I have shot. Although I’ve never received any negative feedback.
    This. I love editing, it's my favorite part, but I can't stand cutting someone else's footage, so I started getting into shooting too. Every time I cut footage shot by someone other than myself, I find I'm lacking a certain shot, a few extra frames etc.. When I shoot, I shoot for the edit and the fact that there's no one to blame but myself if it goes bad is good accountability.


    Independent Filmmaker
    BMD URSA Mini 4K/Avid Media Composer/NukeX/Blender/Mixcraft/ProTools/Resolve Studio

    Feature Films
    Wulf - 2008 | Leap - 2010 | Leap: Rise of the Beast - 2011 | Surviving The Wild - 2020


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    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Shoot/light only. 100% of what I do is handed off to the client. I haven't had to edit since I used to string for one of the locals, here in the late 90's/early 00's.


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    I'm a bit amazed by you both, JP & R&G. Not to call you dinosaurs - but I would venture to guess yours is a bit of a dying breed. But I would love to be wrong - and am envious you've both been able to pull it off.
    I started out as a shooter only - but in my market - I would have had to get out of the business years ago - if I hadn't started editing / doing post work, etc. I do believe having to edit - has made me a better shooter.


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    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    I am a better DP and producer than editor but I like editing. I edit most of my corporate and lower budget work but most of my higher end work is edited by editors who are in a higher league than I am.
    Editing is fun but can be tedious. I suck at motion graphics but I produce high end motion graphics with a couple of top designers and animators so I know motion graphics from a producer standpoint.
    Wish I knew AE, I miss several jobs where I could shoot and edit but they always want someone who can do good work in AE and I can't.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    This is an interesting subject to me and one I discuss often.

    From my earliest experiences shooting I was also editing...1/2" black and white reel to reel (Sony Portapak) was my first experience in both, then early VHS. In college it was film, then back to tape again thereafter. Three years at a production company doing all of the shooting and editing (mostly 3/4"). Eventually I focused more on shooting, although when Final Cut Pro came out in '99 I got back into editing my own reels and personal projects, which continues to this day.

    What I took from all of this, as mentioned by others above, is learning how to shoot for the edit. In prep, I see the edit in my mind and reverse engineer the shotlist out of that. I always maintain that if I can visualize my cut in my head, a great editor can come up with five other ways to cut it that are (hopefully) better--but it's certain that they won't get stuck with a difficult piece to cut.

    It's hard for me to imagine doing what I do without having that background. As it is, I sometimes have conversations with my operators about nuances of their choices and will tell them "you just forced the scissors", meaning they have hamstrung the editor into having to make an edit which limits their options. A classic example is when a character walks out a door or stands up in a closeup--do you follow them out the door or out of their seat, let them out of frame, or "nickel them out" (meaning, give them a little bit of movement to keep them in frame just a bit longer and then let them out)? Those choices all have to be made based on the best guess of what the editor will want--it is surely that much harder to deliver that if you haven't been in their seat.

    I have a lonnnng story I could tell about this--probably not the right venue here. Would definitely be a tl;dr situation.
    Charles Papert
    charlespapert.com


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    I have a firm beleif that everyone should edit, once. I f you have not editied a film I dont really want to work with you - that goes for producers, sound men, directors whatever.

    The film may be 25s long and donr 20 years ago - but if you have not edited a film you are probably clueless.

    Today I edit if I have to, but bigger projects will have a proper editor.

    ---

    I note the correlation between non editors here and those who seem to want to shoot baked and dont think a grade can bring much to the party!

    MOdern digital cams only come alive in the grading suite. All cam department should have a few tens of hours grading.


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