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    #31
    Senior Member Liam Hall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markfpv View Post
    100% agreed. The older I get, the more cynical and skeptical I become.



    This genuinely intrigues me Liam. The insurance company that underwrites your health insurance, I assume?
    It was a note we got from our production insurance company. I get odd advice from time to time from my insurers; last year I had a shoot with indigenous people in Colombia - we were told we had to take armed security (which would have been an insult to our hosts), I had another one in Lahore where I had to get kidnap insurance because the CIA had shot a couple of people (there was zero trouble) and yet in a couple of weeks I'm due to be shooting land mines being cleared in Angola and no one bats an eyelid.
    New Website: www.liamhall.net
    TWITTER: @FilmLiam
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    #32
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    The big eye opener in life is when you realize that everyone is out to relieve you of any money, assets or nice things that you have earned.
    It's really not a matter of distrust or cynicism, it's accepting things for what they are. Corporations, conglomerates as well as all forms of government exist to reduce your individual rights and freedoms.
    The worst word in the English language is "should" because it is only signifies a person existing in a fantasy world of their own greed, want and delusion, not for
    accepting the world for how it really is.

    Gladwell's writing about Truth Default Theory (TDT) should be mandatory reading for all young adults, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truth-default_theory
    it's what gets most people in trouble. I never default to truth as I analyze people, situations and choices, people lie, fib, disguise their alterior motives as
    a symptom of the human condition. The other thing is to get over being hurt, wounded by it. Just accept it as normal human behavior and live your life.
    Try to be a good person and treat others kindly but never assume many others are doing the same. Accepting this doesn't make me distrust, cynical or
    bitter, it allows me to view situations and people as they really are, not how I think they should be.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
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    #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liam Hall View Post
    It was a note we got from our production insurance company. I get odd advice from time to time from my insurers; last year I had a shoot with indigenous people in Colombia - we were told we had to take armed security (which would have been an insult to our hosts), I had another one in Lahore where I had to get kidnap insurance because the CIA had shot a couple of people (there was zero trouble) and yet in a couple of weeks I'm due to be shooting land mines being cleared in Angola and no one bats an eyelid.
    That's interesting. But I suppose at least it means your insurance folks are regularly engaged in your work & travels. And I assume you can disregard or heed their advice for most things.


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    #34
    Senior Member JPNola's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DLD View Post
    It's not odd because stress is a negative factor. And a drink here and there, along with a beignet, can relieve it. That said, proper diet and (light) exercise adds to the quality of life. Not everyone is meant to be Jack LaLanne and do one-armed pushups into his late-80's but it must be nice to walk and swim and play golf at that age also.
    moderation, right? And a ďhealthyĒ balance between planning for the future and devil-may-care.

    Iím just at a point right now as a result of a personal loss and also a personal near-miss of being more aware that everyday may be your last. So enjoy it, be glad to be alive, find joy, see beauty, and donít fret, worry, be cynical, or be paranoid.

    Time spent worrying over coronavirus is time that could be spent marveling at a cloud formation or enjoying friends.
    Big sources matter.


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    #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPNola View Post
    ... I’m just at a point right now as a result of a personal loss and also a personal near-miss of being more aware that everyday may be your last...
    I was at that point when my dad passed away at 65. He had been smoking since he was 12 years of age (while also working full time when his father/my grandfather was KIA in 1944). But my belief is that, while there are no guarantees, an average person is simply increasing his odds by "moderation" as prescribed.

    Here's a scary side story. Warren Zevon was a popular guest on Letterman. Some time in 2001, as I recall, he told Dave that he was diagnosed with cancer and given six months to live. His course of treatment, he said would be to go to a gym and work out to build his strength for chemo. The last time he was on Letterman, he looked very buff, compared to his usual slender self. He ended up surviving eighteen months, a full year longer than six. I attribute it to his exercise regimen. His story stuck with me because I also happened to have met his son Jordy (back in 1993-94 in LA) a few times and I thought that the family was thankful for that extra year of Warren's life. I also thought that, if one could triple the doctor's negative prediction time by simply working out a bit, then the same approach would do a lot more for someone without such a lethal disease.

    Story #2 - a friend of mine's father survived Auschwitz. He was a teen, was sent to a work-camp. He returned to the USSR after the war. And he liked to take walks. My friend told me that, every night, rain or shine, snow or sleet, he'd put on his coat and a beret and take an hour long walk. Can't get more "moderate" than an evening walk, right? He passed away two years ago at 93. Was his long life span solely due to his evening walks? No one knows. But it surely didn't seem to hurt.


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    #36
    Senior Member JPNola's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DLD View Post
    I was at that point when my dad passed away at 65. He had been smoking since he was 12 years of age (while also working full time when his father/my grandfather was KIA in 1944). But my belief is that, while there are no guarantees, an average person is simply increasing his odds by "moderation" as prescribed.

    Here's a scary side story. Warren Zevon was a popular guest on Letterman. Some time in 2001, as I recall, he told Dave that he was diagnosed with cancer and given six months to live. His course of treatment, he said would be to go to a gym and work out to build his strength for chemo. The last time he was on Letterman, he looked very buff, compared to his usual slender self. He ended up surviving eighteen months, a full year longer than six. I attribute it to his exercise regimen. His story stuck with me because I also happened to have met his son Jordy (back in 1993-94 in LA) a few times and I thought that the family was thankful for that extra year of Warren's life. I also thought that, if one could triple the doctor's negative prediction time by simply working out a bit, then the same approach would do a lot more for someone without such a lethal disease.

    Story #2 - a friend of mine's father survived Auschwitz. He was a teen, was sent to a work-camp. He returned to the USSR after the war. And he liked to take walks. My friend told me that, every night, rain or shine, snow or sleet, he'd put on his coat and a beret and take an hour long walk. Can't get more "moderate" than an evening walk, right? He passed away two years ago at 93. Was his long life span solely due to his evening walks? No one knows. But it surely didn't seem to hurt.

    While largely instinctual, the desire to live operates on an assumption that things are not better after you die. And it is assumption, right?

    For all we know Zevon found that dying was awesome and he regretted that he delayed it.

    sorry, but my mind just has these way outside the box, wildly contrarian thoughts and always has. Iím happy that it does.
    Big sources matter.


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    #37
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    I try not to get cynical but try to get a bit wiser every day. Wisdom is worth more than cynicism.

    (Easier said than done).


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    #38
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    It's easier said than done because wisdom is what makes you cynical.


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    #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPNola View Post
    While largely instinctual, the desire to live operates on an assumption that things are not better after you die...
    Well, I'm Jewish. So there's that.


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    #40
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    A Russian Jew from the Soviet era. Oh, you've had an interesting life.


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