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    #11
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    I’d keep the 50-300. It’s not super fast, but that’s a great range for sit-downs. Medium to really tight.


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    #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by LennyLevy View Post
    Just saw my second recently purchased 18-110 that is not parfocal - What the heck is going on over there in Japan???
    We've got a guy on our crew that has an 18-110 that is far from acting parfocal...almost like the backfocus needs to be adjusted (without the ability to adjust of course.) Not sure if it's the electronics of the lens not compensating properly, or if it's an issue with the glass.

    He's reached out to Sony numerous times and they will not respond to him. Not a good sign for QC and service from Sony.


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    #13
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    Today I got my 18-110, and it is parfocal. Except ... when use manual zoom and zoom in very fast you can see the lens focusing a tiny bit. But when focusing with the servo zoom it can keep up.

    And no more distortion, which is nice!


    And now I have a very cool camera setup, the lens looks great with this nice sun hood, I think people will treat me with a lot more respect. No more 'camera guy but a cinematographer!' It is a shame the new 'pro look of tomorrow' is more of a rigged Panasonic S1H. (I am not serious here).


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    #14
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    Nothing personal out there but i find most people are lazy about lenses and especially about checking whether that lens is really par focal. I doubt whether many people do. You cannot see it unless you zoom you EVF in to 4x's and 8x's and use colored peaking and look at something that has detail in it. I use a 4x3 test chart i had printed up at a copy place.. You will not see it in a 17" monitor because at 18mm and f4 there's just too much slop in the lens. But it will show up on a big screen .

    I can testify that many of these lenses are correctly par focal - I own one and have seen 3 others, so the technology does work. However a lot are not and I don't think Sony is showing repair people how to adjust them correctly. It is an electronic adjustment not a true back focus adjustment. If Sony repair is ignoring you on this don't accept that. Sony repair in LA failed to adjust mine after throwing it out of adjustment in the first place. However they acknowledged their error and eventually sent me 2 copies of the lens to choose from (oddly from "Borrow Lenses) both of which were fine. I kept one and Sony took back mine.

    I have 2 friends dealing with this now. One can just send it back to B&H but the other has to deal with Sony . Will keep you apprised here.

    Re fast zooming. That is a limitation of the lens design. it won't hold focus on a crash zoom.


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    #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by LennyLevy View Post
    Nothing personal out there but i find most people are lazy about lenses and especially about checking whether that lens is really par focal. I doubt whether many people do. You cannot see it unless you zoom you EVF in to 4x's and 8x's and use colored peaking and look at something that has detail in it. I use a 4x3 test chart i had printed up at a copy place.. You will not see it in a 17" monitor because at 18mm and f4 there's just too much slop in the lens. But it will show up on a big screen .

    I can testify that many of these lenses are correctly par focal - I own one and have seen 3 others, so the technology does work. However a lot are not and I don't think Sony is showing repair people how to adjust them correctly. It is an electronic adjustment not a true back focus adjustment. If Sony repair is ignoring you on this don't accept that. Sony repair in LA failed to adjust mine after throwing it out of adjustment in the first place. However they acknowledged their error and eventually sent me 2 copies of the lens to choose from (oddly from "Borrow Lenses) both of which were fine. I kept one and Sony took back mine.

    I have 2 friends dealing with this now. One can just send it back to B&H but the other has to deal with Sony . Will keep you apprised here.

    Re fast zooming. That is a limitation of the lens design. it won't hold focus on a crash zoom.
    I can't say that I've gone to the lengths you have to check my lenses (kudos btw...I'm impressed), but I will say in the limited benchtesting and fairly extensive in-field use, the copy I own, while not 100% perfect, is really close. The one on our crew that is having issues isn't even close. I'll update with more info as I receive it.


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    #16
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    I don't understand what you mean by "lengths". Sure I've gone to the great length of taking a commonly available pdf lens chart on the web and went to kinkos to have it blown up. Cost about $5 plus a piece of foam core. But that's hardly necessary. Open the iris to f4, point the lens at a bookcase or anything flat with a little detail and press the 4x's & 8x's button on the EVF. If you add the color peaking its immediately obvious whether your lens is par focal. Takes about a minute. Not doing it is nuts in my mind.

    Maybe part of the problem is the younger generation didn't grow up with traditional B4 cameras. Every time we put a lens on 2/3" camera we had to adjust the back focus so its a built in reaction . If anything not having a back focus adjustment makes most of us suspicious - for good reason I might add. Not having an adjustment on FS7 and FX9 bothers me. The F3 did and the F5 and F55 do. However in my experience the 18-110 issues are lens related not camera, because i've always seen a known good lens work on every body I've tested.

    There's a lot of DOF slop at 18mm f4 , so my method won't give you a precise reading but it gets you close enough. It certainly will show you if you are way off.


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    #17
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    Can it be a firmware problem? (for this lens)


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    #18
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    I doubt it. I have one of the first lenses that came out and it was fine as well as some others I've seen. Its not a camera issue either. My understanding is there is an electronic method for calibrating the lens and for reasons that elude me it either doesn't always work implying some lenses are defective, or far more likely a lot of people at Sony don't know how ot use it. This is a big problem that Somny does not seem to have addressed. My friend just got a note from Sony telling her that the lens was not supposed to be parfocal and she wasn't using it right. That is clearly incorrect. Mine works fine.
    Last edited by LennyLevy; 02-21-2020 at 01:09 PM.


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    #19
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LennyLevy View Post
    I don't understand what you mean by "lengths". Sure I've gone to the great length of taking a commonly available pdf lens chart on the web and went to kinkos to have it blown up. Cost about $5 plus a piece of foam core. But that's hardly necessary. Open the iris to f4, point the lens at a bookcase or anything flat with a little detail and press the 4x's & 8x's button on the EVF. If you add the color peaking its immediately obvious whether your lens is par focal. Takes about a minute. Not doing it is nuts in my mind.

    Maybe part of the problem is the younger generation didn't grow up with traditional B4 cameras. Every time we put a lens on 2/3" camera we had to adjust the back focus so its a built in reaction . If anything not having a back focus adjustment makes most of us suspicious - for good reason I might add. Not having an adjustment on FS7 and FX9 bothers me. The F3 did and the F5 and F55 do. However in my experience the 18-110 issues are lens related not camera, because i've always seen a known good lens work on every body I've tested.

    There's a lot of DOF slop at 18mm f4 , so my method won't give you a precise reading but it gets you close enough. It certainly will show you if you are way off.
    It's funny, us old timers from the ENG world just expect a zoom lens to have this and know how to 'back focus' a lens in our sleep. Tom Fletcher from Fuji said the cine guys freaked out with the original Premiere Zooms, because they had a back focus adjustment on them. They wanted shims. Yeah what's easier, a built-in adjustment that can be tweaked in literally no time with the lens in place or to have to pull the back of the lens apart and place physical shims in there?


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