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    #41
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Coughlin View Post
    Well yeah, but that goes back to, don't do anything that would make you pop up on their radar and you don't have much to be worried about. They don't want to waste time monitoring the lives of boring law abiding citizens. I would imagine the vast majority of Americans have not done anything that puts them under high scrutiny from the NSA, because as mentioned, the NSA does not have the manpower to monitor the vast majority of Americans, AI or not. So, they've only got time for those Americans who raise red flags. Which I guess just means if you're planning to start a revolution, stay off the grid.

    "Impure thoughts" reminds me of, "You never had a camera in my head."


    I know you're young Eric but for God's sake, study some history. That's all I'll say. Human nature doesn't change. Ever. Man's inhumanity to man is sobering.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Coughlin View Post
    Let me break out some math. 55,000 employees at NSA. 327 million Americans. One NSA employee for every 5945 Americans. 40 hours in a work week, 144,000 seconds. 144,000 NSA employee seconds per week / 5945 Americans = 24 seconds of time that an NSA employee can spend on each American per week. If we go off of world population of 7.7 billion, then it comes out to one second per week per person.

    Which of course means, you have to be important enough to them for their personnel to devote real time and attention to you.

    Geez Eric, Google/Apple et-al knows everywhere you've been, how long you were there, how you got there, how fast you were driving, you're acceleration rate, how long you spent at each signal light, what you like to read, buy, hobbies, sexual preference, age, clothing preferences, what you like to eat, diet, political affiliation, and just about everything else about you. Every friggin keystroke and click is recorded and profiled; and if you have Alexa et.al. they have complete dialogs of your household. China has cool apps people are downloading that are collecting the same things. And you think the NSA can't do the same and more with total access to the internet and telecommunications?


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    #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Coughlin View Post
    Well yeah, but that goes back to, don't do anything that would make you pop up on their radar and you don't have much to be worried about. They don't want to waste time monitoring the lives of boring law abiding citizens. I would imagine the vast majority of Americans have not done anything that puts them under high scrutiny from the NSA, because as mentioned, the NSA does not have the manpower to monitor the vast majority of Americans, AI or not. So, they've only got time for those Americans who raise red flags. Which I guess just means if you're planning to start a revolution, stay off the grid.

    "Impure thoughts" reminds me of, "You never had a camera in my head."
    There was a time when this type of thinking was still a reasonable consideration. I'm saying 15 - 20 years ago. But it's 2020, there has been exponential growth in information gathering - most if it complacently offered by the majority of Americans, the rest available by countless means and algorithms.

    Today, this type of thinking is simply naiveté. The fact that a government isn't using the deep information they have on a given person isn't the issue - it's that they have it at all. And when and how it get's used is competely out of your control.

    That's a very big issue in a very poorly led country, influenced by a very few , very wealthy bodies.


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    #44
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimagine View Post
    There was a time when this type of thinking was still a reasonable consideration. I'm saying 15 - 20 years ago. But it's 2020, there has been exponential growth in information gathering - most if it complacently offered by the majority of Americans, the rest available by countless means and algorithms.

    Today, this type of thinking is simply naiveté. The fact that a government isn't using the deep information they have on a given person isn't the issue - it's that they have it at all. And when and how it get's used is competely out of your control.

    That's a very big issue in a very poorly led country, influenced by a very few , very wealthy bodies.
    There was just a story on the local news this weekend that the DMV's here in NC and SC sell the information they have on drivers to third parties and there is no way for drivers to opt out. We pay them for our drivers license, license plates, registration and renewals every year, in many cases totaling hundreds of dollars, and then they sell the information that they collected via that for millions of dollars a year. One story I found said SC made more than $42 million dollars doing so in 2015, alone. FL made $77 Million in 2017. NC is on the record admitting that sold data has been misused, but they continue to sell our personal information, anyway.


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    #45
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    Timestamped YT links of BTS on Michael Bay's 6 Underground with i2/x7:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQt_CoTALk0&t=16m56s
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXTirDiQZ0U&t=6m37s (then again at 22:03).

    Pretty cool BTS videos in general.


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    #46
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob norton View Post
    Timestamped YT links of BTS on Michael Bay's 6 Underground with i2/x7:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQt_CoTALk0&t=16m56s
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXTirDiQZ0U&t=6m37s (then again at 22:03).

    Pretty cool BTS videos in general.
    Off topic... But a boring-ass movie. Yeah, it was super flashy eye-candy with incredible, gorgeous locations and scenery and almost non-stop action and graphic slow-mo death, but, I was actually glad when it was over. And I generally like Ryan Reynolds, too.


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    #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Run&Gun View Post
    Off topic... But a boring-ass movie. Yeah, it was super flashy eye-candy with incredible, gorgeous locations and scenery and almost non-stop action and graphic slow-mo death, but, I was actually glad when it was over. And I generally like Ryan Reynolds, too.
    Yeah it looks like pretty hard work. His sets look more stressful than others - bayhem on and off screen.


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    #48
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    Those who give up their rights for peace and safety will have neither peace nor safety.

    This is a small piece of the long running plan to remove all rights from the people and give govt full control of all

    We can't go into that more but in lieu of the coming FAA changes :

    (A) does your work require aerial (drone) footage?
    Mine does. Car lots especially demand lots of it. Much of the competition will do it cheap and illegal as long as they can.
    (B) what do we do? This isn't the end of it


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    #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel H View Post
    Rational people would ban cars before tightening on drones.
    Like motorcycles. If they didn't already exist today can you imagine any transport authority or government department approving a means of transport which in some case can reach 150 mph and where the operator had all his/her limbs exposed externally to the mode of transport. An observation from a lifelong motorcycle rider and even racer in his younger days. You should be banning motorcycles from an accident and danger point of view long before cars or drones.

    Chris Young


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    #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by firehawk View Post
    Those who give up their rights for peace and safety will have neither peace nor safety.
    That is really not the quote.

    "Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."

    Anyway, the best thing to do with this is provide a quality public comment on the FAA NPRM with the hope of influencing it back to being something somewhat reasonable.

    RemoteID isn't bad on its face, but the way it's implemented in the NPRM is. The best thing we can do is to comment thoughtfully (which I've already done).
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