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    HIIT - best thing since sliced bread?
    #1
    Rockin the Boat
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    OK, so this is a PSA about HIIT - it's been super effective for me, and I wanted to spread the good word!

    Background - when I turned 40 (awhile ago!), my metabolism slowed down, and I developed a kind of a "belly" - I was always slim, and remained slim, except for this "belly" thing, it's genetic (I got it after my father who had the exact same thing). What it is, is so called "visceral fat", a really unhealthy kind of fat to have. Anyhow, I've always been pretty active, for some years I went regularly to the gym, but also I've jogged for some 15 years or so. But like I said, when I turned 40, no matter what I did I couldn't get rid of this belly fat - I tried diet (cutting calories), I tried different patterns of eating (16:8 restricted eating window, 5:2 diet etc.), I exercised - nothing helped.

    Then the last couple of years, my blood sugar started going up. My A1c went to 5.9% which is pre-diabetic (5.6% is the cutoff level), and my fasting blood sugar was above 100. Again, no matter what I did, I couldn't get those numbers down. My doctor warned me, that I'm on the path to diabetes and I started taking metformin (which didn't do jack in 2 years). Anyhow, I was panicked. And hopeless - no matter what I tried (including medication) nothing worked - diabetes is not something I wanted to experience not just for myself, but I have family obligations etc.

    So I was talking to a friend who knows a personal trainer who works with vets on physical rehab in a medical setting. One thing led to another and the trainer agreed to do a consult with me. He prescribed HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training). Anyway, I'm sure most of folks here know what it is. I even did it myself some years ago, when I did Tabata Workouts for a few weeks. I gave up back then for some reason, I think I just got bored.

    Anyway, my ordinary jogging - that I've done for some 15 years or so, is 40 minutes a jogging session, 4 times a week, or 160 minutes a week. My tempo is quite moderate about 10 miles/hour, so I run 4 miles a session and 16 miles a week. This is what the coach suggested: take 2 of those sessions, on widely spaced days in a week (for me Tuesday and Friday), and keep the overall distance of 4 miles a session, but incorporate 5 sprinting sessions within that workout, each lasting 25-30 seconds. That's it. So, 5 sprints a session, 2 days a week or 10 sprint sessions a week. Now, the key is - and this is where NO COMPROMISE IS POSSIBLE - you *must* run those sprints ALL OUT, and that means really all out, as hard as you possibly can, so that at the end of the 25-30 seconds you can't run a foot more, no way, no how - at that point you transition into slow jogging to recover and jog like that for some 4 minutes or so, then blast another sprint session and so on 5 times and then continue jogging to finish your 40 minute jogging session.

    Man, it's brutal - I mean, when I stop the sprint session it takes all my strength to jog super slow for recovery, all I want is to collapse on the track and heave like a beached fish. Because as the coach stresses - you must give your 100%, or you won't get the benefits of HIIT... it'll be some other kind of training but not HIIT. To do HIIT, you *must* go all out in each sprint session.

    Well, let me tell you - I've been doing this for some 12 weeks or so, and my belly... is GONE. I was just tested for blood sugar, my A1C is down to 5.4% (well within norm!) and my fasting blood sugar is just below 100 (still should go lower). I am no longer pre-diabetic. My doctor is amazed. I quit the metformin. And I FEEL FANTASTIC. I feel better than I've felt in years - and remember, I've always been slim and active, doing jogging and regular long walks. But this is something else! So, I started feeling the effects of HIIT after 5 weeks - and I am never giving it up!

    So, if you have been struggling with blood sugar, Type 2 DM, belly fat, feeling out of shape and out of sorts - I say, try HIIT, it might work miracles for you!

    A few disclaimers - I'm not a doctor, and check with you doc first before you undertake any exercise. From what I've been told and have read, HIIT works for you even if you're older (say, past 65 - I've still got a ways to go before I hit that age ). People who have poor cardiovascular health benefit from HIIT (that said, make sure you don't have any Afib conditions - again, get cleared by your physician first!). People who want to get into shape and so on - the benefits are huge and it doesn't take a huge amount of time.

    Now one other caveat - don't be like me... the coach warned me to first do some muscle training in my legs. I ignored him, figuring that I've jogged for 15 years and my leg muscles are pretty firm - seriously, my legs are muscular. Well, guess what - I've pulled my thigh muscles several times now... sorry, I'm a moron. Don't be me. Build up your leg muscles, even if you've jogged for decades - super fast sprints all out use muscles differently enough that they are not conditioned that way. So start with building up your leg muscles. And then AFTER BEING CLEARED BY YOUR DOCTOR - blast 'em with HIIT.

    So, that's my PSA for the coming New Year's Resolution. One last tip - start your "resolution" at the beginning of December (right about now!), don't wait for January - that way you have a greater chance of sticking with it.

    Anyone else a fan of HIIT? What's your secret to great workouts and what keeps you in shape? Share!

    Good luck and Good Health!


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    It's very popular with football (RBs/WRs) and soccer players whom combine it with light and/or heavy weight-training plus all kinds of core and balancing exercises. (Many consistently change their regimens and routines to continue evolving and challenging themselves.)

    Since the beginning of any human conditioning, I think everyone always learned/agreed that shocking your body in some way always produced results (positive and/or negative), and a specific high-intensity shocks the hell out of it if you can manage it (as you've advised). Definitely need to build up the muscles as many people run but most don't sprint. And when they say sprint, they mean sprint...and you could instantly tweak/pull/sprain/tear something if you're not conditioned.

    Provides the brain a tremendous rush too. (Different than a runner's high...more like a survival high.)
    Retired.


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    #3
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    Absolutely! I mentioned that I felt fantastic, but I should've made more clear that there are - at least I experienced - great benefits to your brain. You certainly feel great after the HIIT session - I've been running for years and never quite got this feeling. From what I understand there is research behind supposedly brain benefits:

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/b...ral-blood-flow

    If indeed HIIT can "offset cognitive decline", then I think it particularly important for slightly older folks - Tarantino (and Brian de Palma) both claim that as a director you're done by the age of 60... who knows, maybe if they tried HIIT, they'd have a bit more time past that I don't know about QT, but watching de Palma's recent films I'd say he's right - at least in his case - that nothing good is happening directing-wise after 60... maybe he should've tried HIIT ...


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    Senior Member Jim Arthurs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldCorpse View Post
    Anyway, my ordinary jogging - that I've done for some 15 years or so, is 40 minutes a jogging session, 4 times a week, or 160 minutes a week. My tempo is quite moderate about 10 miles/hour, so I run 4 miles a session and 16 miles a week. This is what the coach suggested: take 2 of those sessions, on widely spaced days in a week (for me Tuesday and Friday), and keep the overall distance of 4 miles a session, but incorporate 5 sprinting sessions within that workout, each lasting 25-30 seconds. That's it. So, 5 sprints a session, 2 days a week or 10 sprint sessions a week. Now, the key is - and this is where NO COMPROMISE IS POSSIBLE - you *must* run those sprints ALL OUT, and that means really all out, as hard as you possibly can, so that at the end of the 25-30 seconds you can't run a foot more, no way, no how - at that point you transition into slow jogging to recover and jog like that for some 4 minutes or so, then blast another sprint session and so on 5 times and then continue jogging to finish your 40 minute jogging session.
    Interesting, that is food for thought... I'm 54, and have been running ever other day the same 3.5 mile neighborhood route at a 10 min/mile pace since 2002. And I do mean every other day, unless ice/snow or work disrupts me. Thing is, my body has over the time adapted to this level of effort and I have gained weight and have the exact same tummy issue. I had never heard of this training technique, I just have been doing this particular run in total isolation without much attempt to either rate or improve it, and will definitely look into it. I still have a relatively strong sprint in me, so maybe I should try and use it... with the consulting doctor caveats of course

    Jim Arthurs
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    You can google various studies about HIIT - there are many protocols, using stationary bikes, or other means of aerobic exercise that you can take to the max. I find sprinting the easiest, since I already jog - I think you'll find it easy to incorporate. A few cautionary considerations, apart from those I already mentioned (build up your leg muscles!) - don't overdo it, meaning you should do HIIT sessions no more than 3 times a week max, best do just 2 (that's what I do upon the recommendation of the coach) - you need recovery days, so you shouldn't f.ex. do back to back HIIT days. Also, you may want to do a bit of sub-maximal sprinting for a few weeks before starting HIIT, in addition to the leg muscle exercises, because you'll get your legs used to sprinting all out when you start your HIIT - in addition to muscles there are tendons and connective tissue and even neuron-activation, coordination and so on. Once you are confident you got your sprinting form down pat, and your leg muscles strong, you can go for the HIIT. For what it's worth - and you can google this - apparently, despite the brutal effort involved, folks really do tend to stick with it, amazingly enough. I've only been doing it for 12 weeks so far, but I already know I'm sticking with it long term - and like I said, I started feeling the positive effects very, very clearly after 5-6 weeks. Now, everybody is slightly different so maybe you'll feel the benefits sooner (some report as little as 2 weeks), or slightly later (some claim it takes 90 days), but in any case, if you stick with it, you'll see results. Best of luck!


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    Honestly, that sounds like the exercise pattern inherent in intercourse - exertion until you run out of breath, followed by lower-intensity cardio until you regain your breath. Or maybe it's running down an animal in the hunt. Just looking for an analogue in nature, particularly one with more immediate reward because I think that healthy behaviors are usually necessary parts of our natural routine.


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    ..a benefit Im alway trying to persuade her


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    Quote Originally Posted by OldCorpse View Post
    I tried diet (cutting calories), I tried different patterns of eating (16:8 restricted eating window, 5:2 diet etc.), I exercised - nothing helped.

    Then the last couple of years, my blood sugar started going up. My A1c went to 5.9% which is pre-diabetic (5.6% is the cutoff level), and my fasting blood sugar was above 100. Again, no matter what I did, I couldn't get those numbers down. My doctor warned me, that I'm on the path to diabetes and I started taking metformin (which didn't do jack in 2 years). Anyhow, I was panicked. And hopeless - no matter what I tried (including medication) nothing worked...
    But... you didn't try a vegan diet.

    It takes more than exercise, in whatever form it comes in. It also takes proper nutrition (not fad diets, not restricted eating (although there are some benefits in some forms of fasting), but whole foods that give you the micronutrients that are largely lacking in the SAD (standard American diet)). Diet and exercise together are what really makes it go.

    Finding a method that lets you stick with it is nearly a holy grail. Glad you found yours.
    Last edited by Bruce Watson; 12-08-2019 at 12:07 PM.


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    oldcorpse-

    i have been doing some form of hiit for years.

    our bodies adapt very quickly.

    (much more quickly than our learned responses or our attitude!)

    i have found, the key to a quality workout is embracing inefficiencies.

    a run up a hill is more inefficient than a run on a flat surface.

    you will use more energy to cover the same distance.

    that inefficiency is where the muscle growth comes from because blood needs to fill those muscles that are just not used to running up hill.

    the blood rushes to feed the muscles and new pathways are developed or strengthened.

    this simple logic applies to all movement.

    pushups with feet on a box is more inefficient than a regular pushup, thus more growth.

    hiit is a form of embracing that inefficiency thinking to change and re-charge our usual training regiment.

    thanks for the thread.

    all movement is good movement.

    though some movement is better! ;-)

    thumbs up.

    rob
    smalltalk productions/nyc
    the story is never black & white
    it takes Smalltalk to reveal the color

    smalltalk.productions


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    And since this is a filmmaking forum: The Game Changers is an excellent documentary on the subjects at hand.


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