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    #11
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    Is phantom menace shot on film in anamorphic and then 2 and 3 are video and not anamorphic?


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    #12
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    Yes.


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    #13
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry_Green
    ...and why we hate the prequels so very much (hint -- it's precisely because we love the original trilogy, that we are supposed to hate the prequel trilogy...)
    The force is strong.


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    #14
    Resident Preditor mcgeedigital's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry_Green View Post
    The prequels are a reprehensible crime against cinema.

    As for Lucas's genius, and the shiny vs gritty look, and why the prequels suck so very badly in every imaginable way vs the belovedness of the original trilogy, there's an utterly fascinating website that discusses the complexity and layering that Lucas attempted to bring out, called Star Wars Ring Theory. If you take the time to read through all that, you will gain a new appreciation of the genius behind the mad genius, the extents he went to to make his two trilogies, why The Force Awakens was always destined to be a clone of Episode IV, and why we hate the prequels so very much (hint -- it's precisely because we love the original trilogy, that we are supposed to hate the prequel trilogy...)
    QFT.

    Prequels suck.
    Matt Gottshalk - Director/ Dp/ and Emmy Award Winning Editor
    Producer, Digital Creative for the United States Postal Service


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    #15
    Senior Member paulears's Avatar
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    How do you tell if something was shot anamorpic if the transfer to video has been done? Surely it's only anamorphic up to the editor?


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    #16
    Senior Member Batutta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulears View Post
    How do you tell if something was shot anamorpic if the transfer to video has been done? Surely it's only anamorphic up to the editor?
    If it's shot with anamorphic lenses, the out of focus areas stretch vertically, also creating oval shaped bokeh on light sources which is one of anamorphic's signatures. Also, you can see distortions on the edges sometimes if the camera pans L or R, things squeeze and unsqueeze. According to American Cinematographer, AOTC was shot 16:9 on spherical lenses and then cropped to 2.35.
    "Money doesn't make films...You just do it and take the initiative." - Werner Herzog


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    #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    Overall, the prequels are more entertaining than the originals.
    Seek medical attention.
    Mitch Gross
    Cinema Product Manager
    Panasonic System Solutions Company


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    #18
    Senior Member AndreeOnline's Avatar
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    The key thing to understand about Star Wars is there never was 9 parts. I'm not even sure there was more than one.

    As Lucas imagined 'A new hope', I'm sure it was useful to create—in this mind—a world larger than what effectively ended up in Ep IV, but nothing more than fragments or extended imagination/intuition.

    Ep V and VI was the natural continuation of the success of Ep IV, and there were a lot of story arcs that could be extended and concluded in a very natural way.

    I would be utterly amazed if there is a single person out there who believes that ANYTHING from ANY of the prequels, or ANYTHING from ANY of the recent movies existed as even a fragment in Lucas' mind back in '76, or whenever he was writing it.

    OF COURSE the official narrative from Lucas will be different. He can say whatever he wants and no one can go against him, really. But the proof is in the pudding.

    The general healthiness of all the after-the-fact "explainations", are just a testament to people's willingness to subject themselves to any idea that support their own world view and set of ideals.

    It's called show business for a reason. Suspension of disbelief extends beyond the silver screen.

    PS. And by the way: I'm not saying Lucas is trying to deceive people, or that people who believe some of the explainations are fools. Lucas is offering up his narrative for people who are willing to subscribe to it, and who then just feel better about the whole thing as a result. There's no real negative impact for those of us who see through it*

    *= well, apart from that mild but gnawing irritation of missing out on what might have been.
    @andreemarkefors


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    #19
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    Of course, there is a negative impact for those who take Lucas at his word

    *queue Leia kissing Luke scene*


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    #20
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    I was just reminded that, in 1977, the opening crawl to Episode IV - A New Hope did not say "Episode IV - A New Hope." It was added in a reissue of the film, in either 1978 or 1981. Most say it happened in 1981, after the release of the Empire Strikes Back, which surprised audiences when it said "Episode V" instead of "Part II".

    I mean, you're partially right, in that George's plans were nebulous. His very first idea was simply to adapt Flash Gordon, and it was to be a series. But he could not get the rights. So he wrote his own story. He batted around different ideas for the total number. First it was just an infinite series. Then it was 12. By the time I became very interested in filmmaking, around 1990, I read biographies of many directors, including Lucas, and I remember reading about it being a trilogy of trilogies. So I think by then the plan had solidified. But even then he did not have 6 more screenplays ready to shoot or even 6 synopses.


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