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    #21
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    While awaiting delivery of my Asus PA32UCX-K this afternoon, I thought I’d compare a few of the features and specs to Apple’s Display Pro XDR, bearing in mind that the XDR has not yet been tested.

    The XDR boasts 6K, while the Asus is a 4K monitor; however, only the 2019 Mac Pro and 16-inch MacBook Pro can run the XDR at full 6K resolution. Both are true 10-bit displays.

    Apple claims 500 nits for their display in SDR mode and 1,000 nits sustained and 1,600 nits peak brightness in HDR mode. The Asus can deliver anywhere from 620-656 nits in SDR and from 1,400-1,534 nits maximum brightness in HDR, depending on which reviewer you read.

    The Pro Display XDR has 576 local dimming zones, whereas the Asus has 1,152.

    According to Asus, the maximum viewing angle of the PA32UCX-K is 178 degrees in the horizontal and vertical, and according to tests, hue, saturation, brightness, contrast and color temperature remain virtually unchanged even at extreme viewing angles. I expect Apple’s display will be no slouch in this department either.

    As far as connectivity goes, Apple’s monitor has one TB3 port and three USB-C ports. The Asus comes with dual TB3 ports, one DisplayPort and three HDMI 2.0 ports.

    The Apple Pro Display XDR runs $6,500 in the USA when purchased with stand and AppleCare+. Throw in the nano-texture glass option and that figure skyrockets to $7,500.00. In Vietnam, the ProArt 32UCX-K costs half as much ($3,300.00) and comes with stand, a three-year warranty and an X-Rite i1 Display Pro colorimeter (value $250.00). With the Asus, you will however have to factor in another grand for Blackmagic’s UltraStudio 4K Mini. Ouch!
    Last edited by jonpais; 12-12-2019 at 11:22 PM.


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    #22
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
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    HDR will be annoying for a while.

    Ultra bright TV’s are like loud speaker systems, and if content makers and manufacturers have the volume all over the place, it will be unpleasant.

    Growing up, i remember tv advertisements had no volume standard, so jumping from a quiet dialogue driven show to an insanely loud commercial was so annoying.

    When we now have high brightness values, but we still end up watching movies at night before sleep, and that retina burning brightness can’t be any better for our sleep cycles, not too mention high bright screens can be annoying at night, as anyone knows opening their phone in full bright at night.

    Overall, HDR looks to be an improvement. Opens up some possibilities. Like when Wizard of Oz went from BW to Colour, the modern film makers can keep contrast ratios smaller in the first bit of the film, and then explode into bigger brighter ratios for a later sequence. We have a bigger palette to work with now. And that is exciting.
    Last edited by James0b57; 12-14-2019 at 01:06 PM.


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    #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    HDR will be annoying for a while.

    Ultra bright TV’s are like loud speaker systems, and if content makers and manufacturers have the volume all over the place, it will be unpleasant.

    Growing up, i remember tv advertisements had no volume standard, so jumping from a quiet dialogue driven show to an insanely loud commercial was so annoying.

    When we now have high brightness values, but we still end up watching movies at night before sleep, and that retina burning brightness can’t be any better for our sleep cycles, not too mention high bright screens can be annoying at night, as anyone knows opening their phone in full bright at night.

    Overall, HDR looks to be an improvement. Opens up some possibilities. Like when Wizard of Oz went from BW to Colour, the modern film makers can keep contrast ratios smaller in the first bit of the film, and then explode into bigger brighter ratios for a later sequence. We have a bigger palette to work with now. And that is exciting.
    It isn’t at all about blinding brightness, though. 90% of the image will still fall within the 0-120 IRE range we’re accustomed to. It is about superwhites, which includes stuff like clouds, specular reflections and sources that actually emit light, like fire, explosions, the glint on an automobile windshield.... It’s about seeing more shades of black. Better color rendition. Higher dynamic range. Brilliant examples of HDR productions include Chef’s Table and Sense8. I watch movies in HDR at night on my LG OLED TV with Technicolor Expert (dark room) and as far as overall brightness goes, it’s rather normal. What is blinding is to hold my 620 nit iPhone 7 up to my face in a dark room.


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